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Cachers Who Commit Illegal Act to Find Cache


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If this one has been specifically discussed I couldn't find the thread, so thought I'd ask the question -- what if anything should a CO do when a cacher logs a find, but in the log admits that they committed an illegal act to find the cache?

 

The specific instance is someone caching in a City Park that was clearly closed, with a locked gate and a sign posted that entry while closed is trespassing and a violation of criminal code. And the cacher admits in their log entry that the park was closed and so they went in anyway.

 

This has come up in our area at least a few times that I can recall -- where for example, when it was discovered that a cache was illegally placed on posted private property and the reviewer was notified of that and then properly and quickly archived the cache, but then cachers still went after that and logged the cache (with dates that are after the archive date). But this is the first time that I've had someone log on of mine and in doing so admit that they broke the law to do so. I'm particularly troubled by this as this is the kind of thing that then causes a City to ban caches in parks, and so far this City has been very open about caches in City parks. And they are particularly sensitive about this park as there have been incidents of vandalism there, underage drinking, etc. Add to that, this is a cacher that has been active for nearly two years, but has a smallish number of finds

 

Does that merit a log deletion? Does this merit a message to the cacher? Have you had similar situations and if so, what did you do?

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This has been discussed on occasion and you will get several different opinions about what to do. One question that often comes up is what do you do when the log is resubmitted minus the confession? It gets to be a can of worms.

 

In this group (as in others) there are some for whom the act of breaking the law or even the common sense guidelines of respect for the environment make the find more exciting. I have seen cases where a cacher will bushwhack through an area to take the shortest route and do damage (create an additional trail) rather than follow the trail. Not much can be done about them.

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When something like that happened to my cache, I sent private email mentioning that the cache location is closed at night, and asking the finder to edit their log so they don't encourage others to find the cache when the location is closed. The finder apologized and edited his log.

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I believe Groundspeak has already stated they do not think its a deletable offense if someone went to a park after hours (assuming they even knew they were in a park), but to delete anyone's log that is referencing a legitimate find should be a last resort. If it bothers you, ask them to remove the part that was obvious about going to a park late at night, and move on. There seems to be a lot of heat on this issue in the Seattle area.

 

To be honest, am sure there are worst things to do than go into a park at night....like trespassing, crossing a dangerous train track that says you should not, or getting into a fist fight over a FTF or something else.

Edited by lamoracke
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I believe Groundspeak has already stated they do not think its a deletable offense if someone went to a park after hours (assuming they even knew they were in a park), but to delete anyone's log that is referencing a legitimate find should be a last resort. If it bothers you, ask them to remove the part that was obvious about going to a park late at night, and move on. There seems to be a lot of heat on this issue in the Seattle area.

 

To be honest, am sure there are worst things to do than go into a park at night....like trespassing, crossing a dangerous train track that says you should not, or getting into a fist fight over a FTF or something else.

 

Going into a City park here after hours or when it is otherwise closed is trespassing (which is of course a violation of the GS rules that prohibit violating any laws while caching). In this case the cacher did know they were in the park -- the log entry confirms that -- and knew that the park was closed -- again confirmed by the log entry. And he'd have to have known about the trespassing because you have to come to the locked gate to know that it's closed, and on that is a very large sign that spells it all out.

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Exact log entry was:

"Park was closed today so I had to walk in from a short distance away. I zeroed in on the GZ and found it pretty quickly. SL. TFTC!"

I've been to parks that were blocked off for vehicles but were not really closed. (Nothing in that log makes me think it was a nighttime find after park hours.) Edited by beejay&esskay
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Exact log entry was:

"Park was closed today so I had to walk in from a short distance away. I zeroed in on the GZ and found it pretty quickly. SL. TFTC!"

I've been to parks that were blocked off for vehicles but were not really closed. (Nothing in that log makes me think it was a nighttime find after park hours.)

 

No, didn't say that. The log entry stated that the park was closed. When the park is closed the gate is locked and the sign is right there saying that the park is closed. There is no "not really closed" status. The park was closed.

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I think your making a bigger deal out of this then it needs to be. From his log it seems like he didn't climb a fence or anything, just took an alternate route. Parks close for more reasons other then "It's nighttime".

 

There's one geocache locally that over 10 people admitted to breaking the law on... It's like a 5 mile walk if you park legally. I personally parked illegally was because everyone else said they did in their log. I didn't get in trouble, no one else did either.

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I think your making a bigger deal out of this then it needs to be. From his log it seems like he didn't climb a fence or anything, just took an alternate route. Parks close for more reasons other then "It's nighttime".

 

There's one geocache locally that over 10 people admitted to breaking the law on... It's like a 5 mile walk if you park legally. I personally parked illegally was because everyone else said they did in their log. I didn't get in trouble, no one else did either.

 

Frankly, you make the perfect point for why to make it a big deal. Doesn't matter what alternate route he took or what reason the park was closed because entering the park when it is closed is trespassing and it is posted as such. And anyone else seeing the log entry will also then assume that it must be okay to do the same thing just as you did. Besides, in your situation you didn't trespass to get the cache. Parking illegally nearby the cache has nothing to do with trespassing where the cache is.

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I believe Groundspeak has already stated they do not think its a deletable offense if someone went to a park after hours (assuming they even knew they were in a park), but to delete anyone's log that is referencing a legitimate find should be a last resort.

I don't believe Groundspeak has ever stated such a thing. But I may be wrong as I could have missed such an announcement.

 

What Groundspeak has done is to prohibit cache owners from having Additional Logging Requirements and from deleting logs based on these requirements. Because of the way they wrote these new guidelines, some have interpreted this to mean that if a geocacher has signed the physical logbook in the cache, the cache owner may not delete the online log.

 

I don't believe this is the correct interpretation of the guideline. It should be obvious that a log that violates the terms of use (e.g. contains vulgarity or is overtly commercial) can and should be deleted by the cache owner. In addition most will agree that a cache owner can delete a log that contains a spoiler. Now, if the logger has legitimately found the cache, they could certainly resubmit a log that is not vulgar and doesn't have a spoiler.

 

Note that while the cache placement guidelines state that local laws and regulations must be followed to list a cache on Geoaching.com, there is no similar guideline that cache finders have to follow local laws and regulations. However, the general consensus is that all law should be obeyed while geocaching so that the activity will be viewed in a good light by authorities, especially by land managers of parks where caches are hidden. As such, finders who knowingly violate local laws and regulation when searching for cache put the continuation of caching in these areas at risk.

 

I would think that, at a minimum, a cache owner could delete a log that states the finder broke laws to find the cache. The finder could then relog without stating that they broke any laws.

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I think that the first action you should take is sending the cacher an email politely explaining your issues with them and asking THEM to change their log. If they refuse or don't respond, then decide what to do from there. It could be a misunderstanding on their part, despite what you think is an obvious infraction. Just my pair of pennies.

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......(which is of course a violation of the GS rules that prohibit violating any laws while caching).

 

I'm probably looking in the wrong place, as I can't find this in the guidelines or anywhere.

 

Presumably this would also apply to traffic offences such as speeding and parking when on a numbers run?

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I think that the first action you should take is sending the cacher an email politely explaining your issues with them and asking THEM to change their log. If they refuse or don't respond, then decide what to do from there. It could be a misunderstanding on their part, despite what you think is an obvious infraction. Just my pair of pennies.

 

Which I think is the most appropriate direction to go. I came to the same conclusion in discussing this with a reviewer -- I'm hoping that it was an action not well thought out (by the cacher), hope that it will be an opportunity to educate someone, and especially hope that if all goes well that it will result in no mention of illegal activities in the log.

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......(which is of course a violation of the GS rules that prohibit violating any laws while caching).

 

I'm probably looking in the wrong place, as I can't find this in the guidelines or anywhere.

 

Presumably this would also apply to traffic offences such as speeding and parking when on a numbers run?

 

It actually took me awhile to find it as well -- and in my above statement I was over simplifying it just a bit to make the point as I was meaning here on GS rather than the entire universe of "while caching", but the actual requirement is contained in the "GEOCACHING.COM SITE TERMS OF USE AGREEMENT" in paragraph 4(i) which state that "You agree not to:"

 

"Violate any applicable local, state, national or international law."

 

As soon as you post a log online you are subject to those terms. And I'd have to believe that it would be a violation to state in a log that you broke the law to make the find. Not being an attorney and all that it would seem that there would be legal ramifications to making an online declaration (admission) that you broke the law.

 

Anyway, again, that was just an off-hand comment to respond to the point. I did come here to ask for opinions and other thoughts, and have gotten that. :)

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I think that the first action you should take is sending the cacher an email politely explaining your issues with them and asking THEM to change their log. If they refuse or don't respond, then decide what to do from there. It could be a misunderstanding on their part, despite what you think is an obvious infraction. Just my pair of pennies.

 

I like this pair of pennies. +1, as they say. Log deletion without an email explanation or discussion causes drama every time.

 

People admitting going into parks after hours, climbing cemetery fences, etc... happens all the time. More often than not, something called being "FTF" is involved. :unsure:

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IF FTF Run, then Rules are off.

If not an FTF Run, then each cacher will find that happy balance.

 

The Steaks

 

To Each Their OWN... As long as they SIGN the Logbook.

 

This is the attitude that has gotten geocaching banned from many places, and will continue to get geocaching banned from many places.

 

Many people don't care about anything but their own little smilie.

Maybe they'll only care when the game is totally outlawed. They certainly don't care anything about the consequences of their actions before that.

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IF FTF Run, then Rules are off.

 

Why in the world would that be true?

 

The poster left off the <sarcasm> </scarcasm> parts. :P

I sure hope you're right, because that post sure got my dander up!! :mad:

 

Park managers do sometimes watch caches and read the logs. While I think the OP's use of words such as "committing illegal acts" and such are hyperbole to the extreme for what surely would amount to a ticket at the very worst if caught, such actions can and do make geocachers look irresponsible to land managers and law enforcement personnel. Such actions should be discouraged, and writing about them online after the fact should also be discouraged.

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IF FTF Run, then Rules are off.

 

Why in the world would that be true?

 

The poster left off the <sarcasm> </scarcasm> parts. :P

I sure hope you're right, because that post sure got my dander up!! :mad:

 

Park managers do sometimes watch caches and read the logs. While I think the OP's use of words such as "committing illegal acts" and such are hyperbole to the extreme for what surely would amount to a ticket at the very worst if caught, such actions can and do make geocachers look irresponsible to land managers and law enforcement personnel. Such actions should be discouraged, and writing about them online after the fact should also be discouraged.

 

While you're certainly entitled to an opinion that doesn't make it factual. It's certainly not hyperbole ("exaggerations to create emphasis or effect") if it is in fact an an illegal act -- which it is and is covered under Virginia Code § 18.2-119 and that's why the City has all of the City parks here posted as such.

 

As for this being as you suggest "amount(ing) to a ticket at the very worst" -- you don't know that. Trespass in a City park here is a Class 1 misdemeanor and the penalty for that can be confinement in jail for not more than twelve months and a fine of not more than $2,500, either or both. Regardless, it's not "just a ticket" as you get arrested for trespass on City property. Even if they "only" issue a ticket, that is an arrest -- you are just being released based on signing that ticket, but that is pending a date in Court that you agree to appear for, which is set forth in the ticket. But trespass in a City park where they've had problems when the park is closed is more likely to get you in a fair amount of trouble (e.g., they put you in the back of the patrol car and then check the park and discover vandalism or worse). And in some parks you're more likely to find yourself before the Magistrate.

Edited by drdan01
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IF FTF Run, then Rules are off.

 

Why in the world would that be true?

 

The poster left off the <sarcasm> </scarcasm> parts. :P

I sure hope you're right, because that post sure got my dander up!! :mad:

 

Park managers do sometimes watch caches and read the logs. While I think the OP's use of words such as "committing illegal acts" and such are hyperbole to the extreme for what surely would amount to a ticket at the very worst if caught, such actions can and do make geocachers look irresponsible to land managers and law enforcement personnel. Such actions should be discouraged, and writing about them online after the fact should also be discouraged.

 

While you're certainly entitled to an opinion that doesn't make it factual. It's certainly not hyperbole ("exaggerations to create emphasis or effect") if it is in fact an an illegal act -- which it is and is covered under Virginia Code § 18.2-119 and that's why the City has all of the City parks here posted as such.

 

As for this being as you suggest "amount(ing) to a ticket at the very worst" -- you don't know that. Trespass in a City park here is a Class 1 misdemeanor and the penalty for that can be confinement in jail for not more than twelve months and a fine of not more than $2,500, either or both. Regardless, it's not "just a ticket" as you get arrested for trespass on City property. Even if they "only" issue a ticket, that is an arrest -- you are just being released based on signing that ticket, but that is pending a date in Court that you agree to appear for, which is set forth in the ticket. But trespass in a City park where they've had problems when the park is closed is more likely to get you in a fair amount of trouble (e.g., they put you in the back of the patrol car and then check the park and discover vandalism or worse). And in some parks you're more likely to find yourself before the Magistrate.

 

Please read the rest of my post before you go off about what I said about the hyperbole. I was basically agreeing with you. But be honest... this isn't exactly High Crimes and Misdemeanors. I seriously doubt that a cop would even issue a ticket unless there had been some other crime committed or damage done.

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IF FTF Run, then Rules are off.

 

Why in the world would that be true?

 

The poster left off the <sarcasm> </scarcasm> parts. :P

I sure hope you're right, because that post sure got my dander up!! :mad:

 

Park managers do sometimes watch caches and read the logs. While I think the OP's use of words such as "committing illegal acts" and such are hyperbole to the extreme for what surely would amount to a ticket at the very worst if caught, such actions can and do make geocachers look irresponsible to land managers and law enforcement personnel. Such actions should be discouraged, and writing about them online after the fact should also be discouraged.

 

While you're certainly entitled to an opinion that doesn't make it factual. It's certainly not hyperbole ("exaggerations to create emphasis or effect") if it is in fact an an illegal act -- which it is and is covered under Virginia Code § 18.2-119 and that's why the City has all of the City parks here posted as such.

 

As for this being as you suggest "amount(ing) to a ticket at the very worst" -- you don't know that. Trespass in a City park here is a Class 1 misdemeanor and the penalty for that can be confinement in jail for not more than twelve months and a fine of not more than $2,500, either or both. Regardless, it's not "just a ticket" as you get arrested for trespass on City property. Even if they "only" issue a ticket, that is an arrest -- you are just being released based on signing that ticket, but that is pending a date in Court that you agree to appear for, which is set forth in the ticket. But trespass in a City park where they've had problems when the park is closed is more likely to get you in a fair amount of trouble (e.g., they put you in the back of the patrol car and then check the park and discover vandalism or worse). And in some parks you're more likely to find yourself before the Magistrate.

 

Please read the rest of my post before you go off about what I said about the hyperbole. I was basically agreeing with you. But be honest... this isn't exactly High Crimes and Misdemeanors. I seriously doubt that a cop would even issue a ticket unless there had been some other crime committed or damage done.

 

I'm not sure how I'm misstating what you said or not reading your whole post? You said "the OP's use of words such as "committing illegal acts" and such are hyperbole to the extreme" which seems pretty clear to me as the OP. And so I replied that it clearly isn't hyperbole if in fact stating that an illegal act IS an illegal act. So I don't understand why what I've said about your comment isn't accurate?

 

I'm also lost as to why you say this isn't "exactly High Crimes and Misdemeanors" because that's exactly WHAT it is -- I didn't say that it was a "High Crime" but said that it was illegal, and then cited the law that has it as a Class 1 Misdemeanor...which is as high as it goes without moving to felony status. And again, you're entitled to your opinion by saying that you "seriously doubt" that something can happen but you haven't said why/how you'd doubt that. The fact of the matter is that I know for certain that it has happened. And for that very park. I've ridden with police officers (as part of my required ride-alongs) who have done exactly that. And in that park, as well as others. They police specifically ask watchers to call in trespassing in City parks as there is a zero tolerance for some areas and for a variety of reasons.

 

As a cache owner with three caches in that park, cachers breaking the law there and and the potential for losing caching abilities in all City parks does concern me, and I do appreciate your concern for that as well.

 

And again, the import point was that I came here to ask a question, got some advice in response about what to do, did it, and it turned out just fine. So I don't understand the compelling reason to debate whether it is or is not a serious problem. That wasn't the question (but it is how so many threads here seem to get lost quickly, I think).

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And again, the import point was that I came here to ask a question, got some advice in response about what to do, did it, and it turned out just fine. So I don't understand the compelling reason to debate whether it is or is not a serious problem. That wasn't the question (but it is how so many threads here seem to get lost quickly, I think).

 

Allow me to repeat the important part of my original reply:

 

if caught, such actions can and do make geocachers look irresponsible to land managers and law enforcement personnel. Such actions should be discouraged, and writing about them online after the fact should also be discouraged.

 

I agree with you; but I also feel that you are over-reacting. That, sir, is my opinion, and I stick by it. Your opinion obviously differs. Please stick by that. Everything is good.

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... Nobody got the TRUE point of my Previous post...

 

To EACH THEIR OWN...

 

Everyone will make their own decisions, and will have to live with those consequences.

 

As An Example(not from me).

 

You get to a small town park to find a cache. After parking, you see that the cache is only 30 Feet from you. You get out of the car and see that the park closes at sunset and your GPS says that sunset was 15 minutes ago. Do you go after the cache?

 

The Steaks

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... Nobody got the TRUE point of my Previous post...

 

To EACH THEIR OWN...

 

Everyone will make their own decisions, and will have to live with those consequences.

 

As An Example(not from me).

 

You get to a small town park to find a cache. After parking, you see that the cache is only 30 Feet from you. You get out of the car and see that the park closes at sunset and your GPS says that sunset was 15 minutes ago. Do you go after the cache?

 

The Steaks

 

The problem with this is that the actions of some will affect others. Don't think that because you think something is okay, that it won't affect anyone else.

 

Disclaimer: This post in no way reflects my opinion on the OP or the topic therein.

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IF FTF Run, then Rules are off.

If not an FTF Run, then each cacher will find that happy balance.

 

The Steaks

 

To Each Their OWN... As long as they SIGN the Logbook.

Local law enforcement will probably disagree. Attitudes of entitlement like this ("I'm on an FTF run, who cares if the park is closed?") just lead to areas being closed to caching altogether.

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When I come across of a log on one of our caches that clearly indicates the finder broke the law or did some other activity that was inappropriate the log gets deleted--with or without an explanation.

 

We had a cache where the description indicated that cachers were not to go onto the property when the chain was up or at night. Yet, certain cachers would go in anyway and say so in their logs. Those got deleted. It was around this time I was asked to remove the cache. They never said directly it was the actions of the geocachers and I don't think they would have said even if it were due to the nature of what was going on at the time.

 

This was probably around the time that the numbers game really soured my enthusiasm for the "sport" of geocaching. The attitude of getting as many numbers as possible both on the finding and spew of the hiding really took the quality of the hobby in a major downturn. The "I'm here and I'm going to get this find no matter what" attitude is one reason for flagrant abuses as detailed in this thread.

 

The problem with deleting logs after the fact is if the person who gave permission puts the cache on his watch list. Once the log is submitted the damage is done. Now the cache owner has to answer to the property owner or steward as to why fellow hobbyists are acting so irresponsible and why should he continue to allow the cache to exist.

 

On the same note, I patrol an area where there are a few caches with similar restrictions. I don't have the first problem with issuing trespassing citations and sending you on your way. Heck, I might even log the additional "find" as a note on the cache page as a warning to others. (Names redacted, of course.)

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... Nobody got the TRUE point of my Previous post...

 

To EACH THEIR OWN...

 

Everyone will make their own decisions, and will have to live with those consequences.

 

As An Example(not from me).

 

You get to a small town park to find a cache. After parking, you see that the cache is only 30 Feet from you. You get out of the car and see that the park closes at sunset and your GPS says that sunset was 15 minutes ago. Do you go after the cache?

 

The Steaks

 

The problem is that all of us may have to live with the consequences.

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The rules say... (paraphrased)

 

Find cache, sign log, get smiley.

Technically you aren't allowed to delete a log if the logsheet was signed.

 

I disagree with that statement that you aren't allowed to delete a log.

 

See the below quote from the KBs. It would sure seem to me to apply in this instance as indicating that you violated the law to find the cache is, as I pointed out above, a violation of the Terms of Use Agreement, which then means that they may be deleted.

 

 

5.7. Log Deletion

Logs can be deleted by the owner of the log, by the owner of the listing (the cache owner) and by site administrators. Logs that fail to meet stated requirements (such as Found It logs by people who have never found the cache) or logs that conflict with our Terms of Use Agreement may be deleted.

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.... requirement is contained in the "GEOCACHING.COM SITE TERMS OF USE AGREEMENT" in paragraph 4(i) which state that "You agree not to:"

 

"Violate any applicable local, state, national or international law."

 

As soon as you post a log online you are subject to those terms. And I'd have to believe that it would be a violation to state in a log that you broke the law to make the find.

...

 

Thanks for that.

I agree, that TOU section allows a cache owner to delete logs of those who note trespassing to get caches.

 

I had a log on a cache of mine in the last week that mentioned 10pm as find time. Area opened dawn to dusk.

I just added a note above their log, quoting the hours, and thanking them for observing the posted hours. <_<

 

I'm not going to delete their log over it, or even ask them to edit it. Indeed, it's a widely watched cache, I prefer to let their words stand right there.

The issue isn't whether they say they trespassed, it's that they actually did. And that's done deal. Too late for any action on my part to matter. Had they been caught, they'd have been ticketed; it's a $90 fine per person.

 

That particular land manager isn't going to kick out geocachers over violations like this, they're far more concerned with poaching game, so I'm not going to pretend that it's important to get the info off the cache page.

 

It MAY be important in some other areas, other parks. Log deletion may be appropriate in some cases.

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We often hear it is important to delete these logs and/or have the logger edit them, most often because we may cause a land manager to pull caching.

 

What looks worse? A land manager has a cache on a Watch list and sees a questionable log. He then goes back later and finds that log is missing or no longer reads the same way. NOW it looks like cachers not only perform illegal acts but also make efforts to hide these activities as well.

 

Leave the log and it eventually scrolls off the page anyway. What's next? Every time someone mentions "racing for a cache" we want to delete the log lest it appear cachers also engage in street racing?

 

There are a lot of factors in play here that will vary with the area: the relationship between the local land managers and the caching community, the wording of the log itself, the type of illegal activity performed, etc. Depending on all of those my reaction would range from:

 

- Meh

- Email finder asking to remove reference to the act

- Delete the log

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You can't really do much about cache hunters- they will do what they will.

The cache owner on the other hand can:

 

Delete the log.- I wouldn't do this. The finder might get angry and take it out on the cache and perhaps even vandalize the area, besides they were warned that they might be arrested if they were caught. They were just lucky they weren't.

 

Send a note explaining to them how their actions might give geocaching a bad name and possibly lead to more land owners refusing to allow caches to be placed on their property. Congratulate them on finding the cache but ask them to refrain from doing that in the future because it could create problems for the game and it would surely be a shame for them to be arrested because of a game.

 

Archive or move the cache.- If there are cachers who will abuse the law, putting themselves at risk for legal action, then maybe you need to move the cache or archive it rather than hope they will smarten up. Leaving it there when you know people are abusing the law could also lead to giving geocaching a bad name. You may have done nothing wrong, but sometimes you have to do what is in the best interest of the game. It's a shame, there will be fewer caches to find due to the actions of a few.

 

Post a large note on your cache page encouraging cachers to obey the laws like: "Please respect the land owners wishes and do not look for this cache when the park is closed. Thank You." This may help, but some people only download the coordinates to their GPS without bothering to really read the cache page before they go to look for it.

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Archive or move the cache.- If there are cachers who will abuse the law, putting themselves at risk for legal action, then maybe you need to move the cache or archive it rather than hope they will smarten up. Leaving it there when you know people are abusing the law could also lead to giving geocaching a bad name. You may have done nothing wrong, but sometimes you have to do what is in the best interest of the game. It's a shame, there will be fewer caches to find due to the actions of a few.

That's kind of like telling the park to close if they don't like folks coming in after hours.

 

Post a large note on your cache page encouraging cachers to obey the laws like: "Please respect the land owners wishes and do not look for this cache when the park is closed. Thank You." This may help, but some people only download the coordinates to their GPS without bothering to really read the cache page before they go to look for it.

One shouldn't have to state anything in the cache description that is inherent to the hobby to begin with. It should just be a given.

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One shouldn't have to state anything in the cache description that is inherent to the hobby to begin with. It should just be a given.

 

It would be nice if it were true. How many caches have you placed that you can make a statement like that? Well maybe not you, but I have found that with my dealings with people looking for cache I can't make any such assumptions.

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I'd say that this is a tricky subject at best.

 

I think the best way to avoid potential law breaking is to USE ATTRIBUTES which a lot of owners do not do.

 

I personally have a couple Nighttime only caches that because of high muggle activity can only be safely found at night but that is listed on the attributes of the cache.

 

As for the park issue, if an owner is concerned about after hours activity they can always include something like this:

"Park hours are XX - XX and is patrolled by rangers and the police so please obey the law."

 

Other than that you can't really control when or how cachers look for your cache.

Sure, most of us cache using common sense but there are some cachers who are totally clueless when it comes to common sense.

 

Another way to avoid this situation if you're too concerned about it is to not put caches in parks.

There's plenty of other locations to make some fantastic hides.

Personally I don't like placing caches in parks because of muggle activity and since most parks close at dusk you know that there are some cachers who will go for it even if it's midnight just to be the FTF.

Most of my hides are out in the country for that exact fact.

Edited by TeamTrekkerz
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Personally I don't like placing caches in parks because of muggle activity and since most parks close at dusk you know that there are some cachers who will go for it even if it's midnight just to be the FTF.

I've had success asking my local reviewer to delay publication of my caches in parks until the morning hours, for precisely this reason. Sometimes it means my caches don't get published right away - my reviewer publishes caches when he/she has the time to do it, and there is a stretch where that's usually in the evenings, then it means my caches may have to wait a few days. But I think that's a small price to pay.

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