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Procedure when finding a syringe near cache


Pirate Rock
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What is the correct thing to do here? I found a nano cache on the weekend under a steel monument, and less than 100mm from the nano was a used syringe. Due to the location I could not remove it (and probably shouldn't anyway)

 

Just want to know what is the correct path to follow?

 

I am currently waiting for the council in the concerned area to return my call (as they have a cleanup crew), but want to know what to do so no one else attempts this and suffers possible injury. Email cache owner and ask for it to be temporarily disabled??

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What is the correct thing to do here? I found a nano cache on the weekend under a steel monument, and less than 100mm from the nano was a used syringe. Due to the location I could not remove it (and probably shouldn't anyway)

 

Just want to know what is the correct path to follow?

 

I am currently waiting for the council in the concerned area to return my call (as they have a cleanup crew), but want to know what to do so no one else attempts this and suffers possible injury. Email cache owner and ask for it to be temporarily disabled??

 

I was going to suggest covering it up with a rock or two but then realized that the first thing the next geocacher to came to look for the cache would do would be to look under the rock.

 

I'd certainly mention it in your logs and maybe even suggest to the CO that the cache be disabled until the area can be cleaned up. Some geocachers will carry a pair of gloves for reaching into dark holes where a cache, or something else, might be. I'm not sure where the best place would be to dispose of a needle even if I could grab it with a pair of gloves.

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It wasn't siting right with me, so a phone call to the council's emergency service was placed and they will have the item removed in the next hour. It's great that some councils are right on the ball with hazardous materials.

 

Hopefully the cache will stay in place (it was a small magnetic 10mm+ container)

Edited by Pirate Rock
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use it to extract the log? :unsure:

 

:anitongue:

 

 

I am currently waiting for the council in the concerned area to return my call (as they have a cleanup crew), but want to know what to do so no one else attempts this and suffers possible injury. Email cache owner and ask for it to be temporarily disabled??

 

seriously? injury from a syringe? :blink:

 

please educate yourself and don't overreact, you will not get any disease, not even AIDS, from a discarded syringe...the virus dies in contact with air and requires direct access to bodily fluids right away after the infected person has used/discarded it

Edited by t4e
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use it to extract the log? :unsure:

 

:anitongue:

 

 

I am currently waiting for the council in the concerned area to return my call (as they have a cleanup crew), but want to know what to do so no one else attempts this and suffers possible injury. Email cache owner and ask for it to be temporarily disabled??

 

seriously? injury from a syringe? :blink:

 

please educate yourself and don't overreact, you will not get any disease, not even AIDS, from a discarded syringe...the virus dies in contact with air and requires direct access to bodily fluids right away after the infected person has used/discarded it

 

False information. HIV and AIDS do die very quickly, but there are other blood borne diseases that last much longer outside the body. Hepititis C can live in dried blood for up to a month. I'm sure there are others that last longer than a few seconds outside the body. A needle is absolutely dangerous to anyone who hasn't used it, don't kid yourself into thinking that it's not.

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seriously? injury from a syringe? :blink:

 

please educate yourself and don't overreact, you will not get any disease, not even AIDS, from a discarded syringe...the virus dies in contact with air and requires direct access to bodily fluids right away after the infected person has used/discarded it

I'm sorry, but you are NOT correct.

 

From: Paintsil E et al. Survival of HCV in syringes: implication for HCV transmission among injection drug users. Seventeenth Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, San Francisco, abstract 168, 2010.

 

The researchers found that cell cultures showed varying levels of HCV infectivity. Looking at the proportion of syringes containing infectious virus, in the low-volume scenario the likelihood of finding infectious virus fell rapidly in syringes stored at 37ºC, and none contained viable HCV after one day of storage.

 

At 22ºC, one-third of syringes still had infectious virus at day one, but none did at day three. At 4ºC, viable HCV remained in about two-thirds of syringes at day one, about one-quarter at day three and about 5% at day seven.

 

The pattern was not as consistent for the high-volume scenario. At the coldest temperature, nearly all syringes still had viable HCV at day seven, about half did at day 35, and a small proportion did even at day 63 (nine weeks).

 

The number of syringes containing infectious virus initially decreased more rapidly at the two higher temperatures, but then levelled out. At room temperature, about 70% had viable HCV at day seven and about 40% did at day 35. At 37ºC, the proportion was just over 50% at day seven and only slightly lower at day 35. Again, a small proportion still contained infectious HCV after 63 days.

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What is the correct thing to do here? I found a nano cache on the weekend under a steel monument, and less than 100mm from the nano was a used syringe. Due to the location I could not remove it (and probably shouldn't anyway)

 

Just want to know what is the correct path to follow?

 

I am currently waiting for the council in the concerned area to return my call (as they have a cleanup crew), but want to know what to do so no one else attempts this and suffers possible injury. Email cache owner and ask for it to be temporarily disabled??

I came across a used needle under a cache a couple of months ago. I picked it up by the non-sharp end and disposed of it in a can. This, in turn, was put into the garbage such that it would not be recycled or poke someone accidentally.

 

I was extremely careful with the entire process. I considered my risk minimal, as long as I was careful, and preferred to take that risk over some cacher's kid accidentally getting poked.

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seriously? injury from a syringe? :blink:

 

please educate yourself and don't overreact, you will not get any disease, not even AIDS, from a discarded syringe...the virus dies in contact with air and requires direct access to bodily fluids right away after the infected person has used/discarded it

 

Your joking right?? :unsure:

 

 

I came across a used needle under a cache a couple of months ago. I picked it up by the non-sharp end and disposed of it in a can. This, in turn, was put into the garbage such that it would not be recycled or poke someone accidentally.

 

I was extremely careful with the entire process. I considered my risk minimal, as long as I was careful, and preferred to take that risk over some cacher's kid accidentally getting poked.

 

As the placement of the syringe was needle out, and the cache was very close to this, I moved the cache a metre to the other side. The cache itself is stuck to a metal 'shrine' to the local area and has mesh underneath. This meant that I couldn't move the syringe, but fingers getting under it to feel for a cache could be in harm's way.

 

I hope the cache survives the council worker, but I feel much better than letting someone else getting risk of being pricked.

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False information. HIV and AIDS do die very quickly, but there are other blood borne diseases that last much longer outside the body. Hepititis C can live in dried blood for up to a month. I'm sure there are others that last longer than a few seconds outside the body. A needle is absolutely dangerous to anyone who hasn't used it, don't kid yourself into thinking that it's not.

 

ooh please that is not at all true, hepatitis C virus can remain alive outside the body for up to four days but, as i said before about the AIDS virus, the Hep C is generally transmitted by blood-to-blood contact, if someone touches dried blood with intact skin (that is, no open cuts or sores), the person will not get hepatitis C.

 

but even with that knowledge you think anyone would pick it up and stab themselves with it willfully?

 

instead of calling all kinds of emergency services and causing a stir. not to mention letting it lay around all that time for any suicidal person to stab themselves with it, bag it and take it away...touching it would certainly not harm you

 

 

Your joking right?? :unsure:

 

 

no, i'm not....what you are so unsure about?

 

 

I'm sorry, but you are NOT correct.

 

From: Paintsil E et al. Survival of HCV in syringes: implication for HCV transmission among injection drug users. Seventeenth Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, San Francisco, abstract 168, 2010.

 

 

you are missing the point, for all this viruses to be transmitted you will have to inject yourself in a VEIN, blood-to-blood, or any open access wound to the bloodstream is required to acquire the virus...a prick will not transmit the virus

 

trust me i know all about them, years ago i worked in a dental office and we had to be aware of those things since you never knew what people had

besides getting all the necessary vaccines we had instructions about viruses

even had a patient that willingly admitted to having AIDS and i didn't get the disease by looking at him

Edited by t4e
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you are missing the point, for all this viruses to be transmitted you will have to inject yourself in a VEIN, blood-to-blood, or any open access wound to the bloodstream is required to acquire the virus...a prick will not transmit the virus

 

trust me i know all about them, years ago i worked in a dental office and we had to be aware of those things since you never knew what people had

besides getting all the necessary vaccines we had instructions about viruses

even had a patient that willingly admitted to having AIDS and i didn't get the disease by looking at him

Either what they told in the Dentists office was baloney or your memory isn't very good.

 

Needle stick infection rates:

Hepatitis B: Of these HBV is the most transmissible, with a risk of infection following exposure of around 6-30%.

Hepatitis C: Infection from HCV following a needle-stick is around 1.8%.

HIV: Risk of becoming infected with HIV is a mere 0.3%.

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you are missing the point, for all this viruses to be transmitted you will have to inject yourself in a VEIN, blood-to-blood, or any open access wound to the bloodstream is required to acquire the virus...a prick will not transmit the virus

 

trust me i know all about them, years ago i worked in a dental office and we had to be aware of those things since you never knew what people had

besides getting all the necessary vaccines we had instructions about viruses

even had a patient that willingly admitted to having AIDS and i didn't get the disease by looking at him

Here is what the CDC has to say:

RISK OF INFECTION AFTER EXPOSURE

What is the risk of infection after an occupational exposure?

 

HBV

Healthcare personnel who have received hepatitis B vaccine and developed

immunity to the virus are at virtually no risk for infection. For a susceptible

person, the risk from a single needlestick or cut exposure to HBV-infected blood

ranges from 6-30% and depends on the hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) status of

the source individual. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals who are HBeAg positive have more virus in their blood and are more likely

to transmit HBV than those who are HBeAg negative. While there is a risk for

HBV infection from exposures of mucous membranes or nonintact skin, there is

no known risk for HBV infection from exposure to intact skin.

 

HCV

The average risk for infection after a needlestick or cut exposure to HCVinfected blood is approximately 1.8%. The risk following a blood exposure

to the eye, nose or mouth is unknown, but is believed to be very small;

however, HCV infection from blood splash to the eye has been reported.

 

There also has been a report of HCV transmission that may have resulted

from exposure to nonintact skin, but no known risk from exposure to intact skin.

HIV

The average risk of HIV infection after a needlestick or cut

exposure to HlV-infected blood is 0.3% (i.e., three-tenths of one

percent, or about 1 in 300). Stated another way, 99.7% of

needlestick/cut exposures do not lead to infection.

 

 The risk after exposure of the eye, nose, or mouth to HIV-infected

blood is estimated to be, on average, 0.1% (1 in 1,000).

 

 The risk after exposure of non-intact skin to HlV-infected blood is

estimated to be less than 0.1%. A small amount of blood on intact skin

probably poses no risk at all. There have been no documented cases of

HIV transmission due to an exposure involving a small amount of blood

on intact skin (a few drops of blood on skin for a short period of time).

 

How many healthcare personnel have been infected with bloodborne pathogens?

 

HBV

The annual number of occupational infections has decreased 95% since hepatitis

B vaccine became available in 1982, from >10,000 in 1983 to <400 in 2001

(CDC, unpublished data).

 

HCV

There are no exact estimates on the number of healthcare personnel occupationally infected with HCV. However, studies have shown that 1% of hospital

healthcare personnel have evidence of HCV infection (about 3% of the U.S.

population has evidence of infection). The number of these workers who may

have been infected through an occupational exposure is unknown.

 

HIV

As of December 2001, CDC had received reports of 57 documented cases and

138 possible cases of occupationally acquired HIV infection among healthcare

personnel in the United States since reporting began in 1985.

 

What you were told in the Dentist's office was not correct.

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Please pardon my ignorance (because that is what it is), but is it really that difficult to pick up a syringe with your bare hands without getting accidentally stuck by the needle? It seems to me that even a modicum of caution is all that you would need to be sure that you picked it up correctly. I can pick up a sewing needle without getting stuck by it... and it hasn't got a large plastic syringe body attached to it. Sure, I understand the potential consequences are a lot greater than getting stuck by a sewing needle, but do we really need a hazmat team in full gear to pick up and trash out something like this?

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Please pardon my ignorance (because that is what it is), but is it really that difficult to pick up a syringe with your bare hands without getting accidentally stuck by the needle? It seems to me that even a modicum of caution is all that you would need to be sure that you picked it up correctly. I can pick up a sewing needle without getting stuck by it... and it hasn't got a large plastic syringe body attached to it. Sure, I understand the potential consequences are a lot greater than getting stuck by a sewing needle, but do we really need a hazmat team in full gear to pick up and trash out something like this?

Gosh, even if you pick it up by the non sharp edge the odds that you will accidently stick yourself and get infected with a fatal disease must be at least as high as being electrocuted when you lift up a lamppost skirt :unsure:

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Please pardon my ignorance (because that is what it is), but is it really that difficult to pick up a syringe with your bare hands without getting accidentally stuck by the needle? It seems to me that even a modicum of caution is all that you would need to be sure that you picked it up correctly. I can pick up a sewing needle without getting stuck by it... and it hasn't got a large plastic syringe body attached to it. Sure, I understand the potential consequences are a lot greater than getting stuck by a sewing needle, but do we really need a hazmat team in full gear to pick up and trash out something like this?

 

Agreed,, When i first started reading this thread i thought to myself that it sounded rediculous that the syringe couldn't simply be picked up, carefully of course, and discarded properly. But if i read the OP's second post correctly, the syringe was behind some wire mesh, needle pointing outward in such a manner that a non suspecting cacher might run his hand across it. I'm taking this to also mean that tools and/or authorized personnel would be needed to gain access for retrieval of the syringe...

 

If this is the case, then who knows how long it would take for the city to send someone out to take care of it. A needs maintenance log with description of the problem probably wouldn't hurt.

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If i haven't found the cache but i have found a syringe I will stop looking. In my experience if theres one you can see theres usually more that you cant see. I've seen used needles stuck to door handles before where i work, so I leave well alone if they are around. DNF and NM.

 

If i've found the cache and a syringe i'll still post a NM

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Filing a NM log does nothing to protect the next cacher who may be an hour behind you or who may not have read your log. We have seen that many COs are quite slow in responding to NM logs and the danger, whatever it is, lingers for any cacher following you.

 

I, for example, usually follow the GPS to the next nearest cache and don't read the cache listing unless I don't find the cache after a few minutes searching. If I reached for a cache, got stuck by a needle and then found out that a previous cacher saw the needle, recognized it as a non-typical hidden risk but did nothing effective to 'safe' it or alert followers then I'm going to be plenty mad at that cacher!

 

Caching is inherently dangerous but some dangers are 'special' by virtue of being hidden and unexpected. If I reach into a hole I expect that there might be a spider in there; I don't expect to get poked by an exposed needle. When you become aware of a special hidden danger then you should do whatever it takes to protect others from it. That's just what people do. These hidden and unexpected risks are the ones that we have a social responsibility to protect others from.

 

In this case the exposed needle posed a hazard to anyone hunting the cache who would have no reason to think "There may be an exposed needle here." Because of its rarity we do not commonly approach caches with that thought in mind. By not finding some way to remove it or render the needle safe I would feel personally responsible if a cacher behind me got stuck by a hidden danger that I was aware of and did nothing effective about. Going home and filing a NM in this case is not an effective way to protect the next cacher.

 

I wasn't there and so have no insight as to how this particular incident should have been rendered safe without undue risk to the finder, but do feel strongly that there was a way to do it on the spot, problem solved, without risk or danger. If the needle was exposed and could stick someone but could not easily be removed a piece of wood pushed onto the tip renders it safe. No drama required and you have protected fellow cachers.

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This topic is about what to do about a syringe found at a cache. If you want to discuss blood born diseases, please take it to the off topic section. Thanks.

Respectfully, I disagree.

 

Urban cachers regularly come across hypodermic needles. I have twice in the last six months. Knowing the potential danger of that needle may prevent the unknowing transmission of a potentially fatal disease.

 

Believing the needles are harmless is dangerous 'knowledge'.

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I've seen that before too.

 

I like the idea that was mentioned about carrying a small chuck of styrofoam, especially if you're a frequent urban cacher who might find more than their fair share of used needles. I would imagine that a wine bottle cork or something small like that would also work just as well.

 

I'd say handle it carefully if you have the materials to do a "field expediant disposal" (and only if you have gloves). If you can break the needle from the plastic, corking the pointy ends in whatever styrofoamy substance might be available, pack the complete syringe away in a ziplock bag for disposal.

 

From there, I would contact the authorities to tell them that they may have a site frequented by drug users. I would also post a notice to the cache's page warning fellow cachers (especially since so many cachers like to include their children in their hobby).

 

Where there is one needle, there's usually more. Be careful.

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I've seen them a few times in parking lots, etc. If I felt one was at risk for poking someone, I would try to put it in a can or something and dispose of it. I happen to work in a hospital, so that would be simple, but anyone can take a needle to an emergency room if they had to. I would not suggest trying to break the needle, that in itself might lead to accidental exposure. If there happens to be a needle cap also nearby, simply scoop it into it's cap, using one hand. Carrying a piece of styrofoam is also an interesting idea!

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False information. HIV and AIDS do die very quickly, but there are other blood borne diseases that last much longer outside the body. Hepititis C can live in dried blood for up to a month. I'm sure there are others that last longer than a few seconds outside the body. A needle is absolutely dangerous to anyone who hasn't used it, don't kid yourself into thinking that it's not.

 

ooh please that is not at all true, hepatitis C virus can remain alive outside the body for up to four days but, as i said before about the AIDS virus, the Hep C is generally transmitted by blood-to-blood contact, if someone touches dried blood with intact skin (that is, no open cuts or sores), the person will not get hepatitis C.

 

but even with that knowledge you think anyone would pick it up and stab themselves with it willfully?

 

instead of calling all kinds of emergency services and causing a stir. not to mention letting it lay around all that time for any suicidal person to stab themselves with it, bag it and take it away...touching it would certainly not harm you

 

 

Your joking right?? :unsure:

 

 

no, i'm not....what you are so unsure about?

 

 

I'm sorry, but you are NOT correct.

 

From: Paintsil E et al. Survival of HCV in syringes: implication for HCV transmission among injection drug users. Seventeenth Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, San Francisco, abstract 168, 2010.

 

 

you are missing the point, for all this viruses to be transmitted you will have to inject yourself in a VEIN, blood-to-blood, or any open access wound to the bloodstream is required to acquire the virus...a prick will not transmit the virus

 

trust me i know all about them, years ago i worked in a dental office and we had to be aware of those things since you never knew what people had

besides getting all the necessary vaccines we had instructions about viruses

even had a patient that willingly admitted to having AIDS and i didn't get the disease by looking at him

 

No need to get defensive. Nobody here has suggested that touching a syringe will give you a disease. Not knowing a needle is there and getting stuck can result in disease transmission. Your statement about diseases not being able to be transmitted by an old needle is incorrect. A needlestick can in fact transmit disease. The odds are lower than if sharing a needle for drug use, but it's still a very real possibility.

 

As far as the original question, I agree that making a note of it in your log is a must. The rest of the course is up to you. Call law enforcement if nothing else, but do not cover up the syringe, others might think that's where the cache is and start digging. Needlestick. If you feel comfortable removing the syringe, feel free to do so but please don't just place it in a garbage can. A police station is probably your best bet, with the local ER also on the list. I'd vote for calling the police and letting them deal with the situation the way they see fit.

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Please pardon my ignorance (because that is what it is), but is it really that difficult to pick up a syringe with your bare hands without getting accidentally stuck by the needle? It seems to me that even a modicum of caution is all that you would need to be sure that you picked it up correctly. I can pick up a sewing needle without getting stuck by it... and it hasn't got a large plastic syringe body attached to it. Sure, I understand the potential consequences are a lot greater than getting stuck by a sewing needle, but do we really need a hazmat team in full gear to pick up and trash out something like this?

 

Agreed,, When i first started reading this thread i thought to myself that it sounded rediculous that the syringe couldn't simply be picked up, carefully of course, and discarded properly. But if i read the OP's second post correctly, the syringe was behind some wire mesh, needle pointing outward in such a manner that a non suspecting cacher might run his hand across it. I'm taking this to also mean that tools and/or authorized personnel would be needed to gain access for retrieval of the syringe...

 

If this is the case, then who knows how long it would take for the city to send someone out to take care of it. A needs maintenance log with description of the problem probably wouldn't hurt.

 

That was my take on the subject also. That said, if the syringe was in a position that I could safely pick it up I would do so and dispose of it. A lot of public restrooms now have Sharps Containers (containers specifically designed for the storage and disposal of used needles, etc.) hanging on the walls so a place to get rid of the thing shouldn't be a big issue at all. I am not fond of sticking the point in a piece of styrofoam or some such because it could give a person a false sense of security that works right up to the point that the foam falls off or the point gets pushed through the other side. Better to drop it point first into an empty water bottle and put the lid back on. That way when you find a Sharps Container it is fairly easy to get it back out safely. Just let it slide out on the ground and pick it up.

A note on the cache page would certainly be in order (doubly so since the cache was moved) and informing the authorities wouldn't hurt either, especially if there are more than one.

Edited by NicknPapa
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This has been an interesting thread to read. The advice about styrophoam or a cork sounds great.

 

I have only found one syringe near a cache in all my years of caching, fortunately.

You are one ahead of me, then!

 

I've found thousands of caches, mostly urban, in 28 states and I've yet to see a syringe.

 

I feel so left out! :rolleyes:

 

I only started and I found like 3 to 4 so far.

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Very interesting reading this thread and the response from different people. One thing that wasn't mentioned is that you don't know what the syringe originally had in it. Drugs? Probably, you don't know. If you pick it up to dispose of it- you are in possesion of it.

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I'd pick the thing up, drop it into an empty water (or soda) bottle and dispose of it whenever practical.

 

The danger of these needles is getting stuck before you spot them. Once you see the things, it's pretty easy to avoid the pointy end.

 

Pharmacies in Canada will dispose of "sharps" eg used needles, blood testing lancets, safely and at no charge. Using a water bottle to store and transport it is an excellent idea

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This has been an interesting thread to read. The advice about styrophoam or a cork sounds great.

 

I have only found one syringe near a cache in all my years of caching, fortunately.

You are one ahead of me, then!

 

I've found thousands of caches, mostly urban, in 28 states and I've yet to see a syringe.

 

I feel so left out! :rolleyes:

I was surprised about the one that I found. I've cached in 25 states, and six countries. The nastiest place I cached in was Central Park in 2002 (although it was nice when we visited last year). I was sure I was going to find a needle there, and skipped a couple spots after not finding the cache within a minute. But oddly enough, the place I found one at was in a nice clean park in my own town, in 2003. I have never seen any obvious drug activity in my town, although I'm sure it happens.

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To the above poster: Do you think the DEA is going to swarm in and cuff you for touching a discarded syringe?

 

Redonkulous

 

I'm not "the above poster," but I can imagine this scenario:

 

4:00 PM: found a syringe near a cache. Stuck a wine cork on the needle and put it in my backpack so I can dispose of it safely later.

 

6:00 PM: Searching for a cache in the bushes along the edge of a city park when someone shines a spotlight on me, followed by revolving red and blue lights. "What are you doing there?" "I'm geocaching, officer."

 

"Geo what? What's that in your hand? Mind if I look in your bag?"

 

Yeah, I could see that ending with me in handcuffs in the backseat of a cruiser, and a trip to the town jail to be booked for possession of drug paraphernalia.

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This has been an interesting thread to read. The advice about styrophoam or a cork sounds great.

 

I have only found one syringe near a cache in all my years of caching, fortunately.

You are one ahead of me, then!

 

I've found thousands of caches, mostly urban, in 28 states and I've yet to see a syringe.

 

I feel so left out! :rolleyes:

As do I. As to the original query, better to err on the side of caution.

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Good grief, some of you are so paranoid. A syringe by itself is not a threat. Just pick it up and dispose of it. Break off the needle if you can. The only part that is dangerous is the needle. Needle sticks are not common in the EMS field. Almost every one of them is where a person was attempting to re-cap the needle, for re-use. Even if the needle was used by an aids/hepatitis user, the chances of contacting a disease, EVEN AFTER A NEEDLE STICK, are very, very remote.

I am much more bothered by finding a used condom near a cache(which I have) than a syringe and needle.

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Whatever the odds are of getting infected with ANYTHING, it is up to you to make the decision to move the syringe. Calling local authorities is the best option. In the ignorance of the legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, they have decriminalized possession of syringes without medical prescription, to "reduce" the risk of junkies using dirty needles. Apparently the risk to kids getting stuck in the foot while at a playground means little to the ultra left wingers composing these laws. I work in law enforcement and I have seen so many carelessly discarded needles laying around in the projects that I thought they were using them as lawn darts. Anyway, it never hurts to carry rubber gloves, and my option would to be put them on, and to place syringe in a plastic disposable water bottle, i.e. Poland Springs or similar, cap the bottle, and turn it in to local authorities. (Unfortunately, or fortunately, however you look at it, you can likely find a discarded water bottle somewhere nearby.)Placing it in regular trash starts another hazard chain for other people. Again, best choice is to notify proper authorities. I am not suggesting you follow my lead. It is just what I would choose to do.

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To the above poster: Do you think the DEA is going to swarm in and cuff you for touching a discarded syringe?

 

Redonkulous

 

I'm not "the above poster," but I can imagine this scenario:

 

4:00 PM: found a syringe near a cache. Stuck a wine cork on the needle and put it in my backpack so I can dispose of it safely later.

 

6:00 PM: Searching for a cache in the bushes along the edge of a city park when someone shines a spotlight on me, followed by revolving red and blue lights. "What are you doing there?" "I'm geocaching, officer."

 

"Geo what? What's that in your hand? Mind if I look in your bag?"

 

Yeah, I could see that ending with me in handcuffs in the backseat of a cruiser, and a trip to the town jail to be booked for possession of drug paraphernalia.

In that specific scenario, you should not have given permission to look in your bag.
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To the above poster: Do you think the DEA is going to swarm in and cuff you for touching a discarded syringe?

 

Redonkulous

 

I'm not "the above poster," but I can imagine this scenario:

 

4:00 PM: found a syringe near a cache. Stuck a wine cork on the needle and put it in my backpack so I can dispose of it safely later.

 

6:00 PM: Searching for a cache in the bushes along the edge of a city park when someone shines a spotlight on me, followed by revolving red and blue lights. "What are you doing there?" "I'm geocaching, officer."

 

"Geo what? What's that in your hand? Mind if I look in your bag?"

 

Yeah, I could see that ending with me in handcuffs in the backseat of a cruiser, and a trip to the town jail to be booked for possession of drug paraphernalia.

In that specific scenario, you should not have given permission to look in your bag.

 

refusing to allow the officer to look in the bag is not quite the approach I would take. Mine would be more like:

 

6:00 PM: Searching for a cache in the bushes along the edge of a city park when someone shines a spotlight on me, followed by revolving red and blue lights. "What are you doing there?" "I'm geocaching, officer, and by the way, at an earlier location I found a used hypodermic.syringe. Would you please tell me where the closest place is that I can dispose of it correctly? I didn't want to leave it for someone to get stuck by accident."

 

You might still have some discussion but I doubt any reasonable LEO would have a problem with you trying to protect innocents.

 

For the record, there is absolutely NO WAY I would ever stick a needle in a cork and stuff it my backpack. Corks come off too easy....

Edited by NicknPapa
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