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What is acceptable as a container to hide a cache in?


Minskie
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Is there some sort of etiquite or standard expected in the choice of cannister one uses ?

 

I have a couple of those small metal tins that mints come in. They are about 5" x 2.5" x 1/2" deep.

 

Open with a metal flap at one end. Strong as all get go and if painted camo, I thought they'ed be ideal.

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Is there some sort of etiquite or standard expected in the choice of cannister one uses ?

 

I have a couple of those small metal tins that mints come in. They are about 5" x 2.5" x 1/2" deep.

 

Open with a metal flap at one end. Strong as all get go and if painted camo, I thought they'ed be ideal.

Tins rate pretty high on the list of caches that suck. They are not weather proof, rust shut and the log is *always* wet. Film cans with the gray top also suck. If you want a micro container that works get a match safe from Wal-Mart or a diabetes test strip container. Bison tubes work if the rubber o-ring stays intact.

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I will have to beg of you NOT to use an Altoid Tin. M&M mini's make good caches, they seal water tight. Altoid tins - All the ones that I have found have been wet inside, with a really musty smelling log. The inside will start to rust because it is bare metal.

 

There are some really inexpensive 4x4 containers, or even just a rubbermaid sandwich container. Avoid the disposible ones, they don't seal as good. You can buy some really nice ones on line, but you can make your own with stuff available locally. My wife got me some no-name brand 4x4's at Big Lots for a few bucks. Cart before the horse, I'm not ready to enter the world of Cache Owner yet.

 

Hope this helps. Like someone else said, the test is if you can dunk it into a bucket of water and everything stays dry.

 

John

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Whilst I'm on the topic of containers. Just how big/small is a 'nano' container usually?

 

Just how tiny is tiny ?

Some people use the term "nano" to refer only to blinkers:

180px-Nano-cache.jpg

 

I use the term for any cache that is only big enough for a custom fit log sheet. Some that I've found have been smaller than the blinker in the photo above.

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Is there some sort of etiquite or standard expected in the choice of cannister one uses ?

I think anything goes, as long as it will stand up to the weather. If you can't dunk it in a bucket of water, then it will not stand up to the rain.

 

Actually the bucket of water test is not a good one. I learned that early on as it was the test I used when I first started hiding caches. The test made sense to me at first, but it is flawed. I had containers that passed the bucket of water test with flying colors only to fail in the wild.

 

When you immerse a container in a bucket of water the water pressure can improve the seal which is not a necessarily a condition that will be encountered in the real world. A cache has to shed water without the benefit of water pressure, and also has to deal with air expansion and contraction due to heat and cold, something that can compromise a seal.

 

The shower test is the best quick test, alternating hot and cold water and holding the cache in different positions under the water. Still, it's not perfect. The only good test is the real world and experience tells us that metal tins do not work well.

 

If the container is completely shielded from the elements, anything can work, but most caches don't have the benefit of being out of the elements.

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What is acceptable as a container VARIES depending on the location.

 

Generally, when comes to tins, the answer is "Just say no". However, some people have been able to get away with them in dry climates AND if it's located in a spot that is not exposed to water...ever. Tin rusts very fast and quickly makes for an ugly, hard to use cache.

 

The wetter your environment, the more water proof your container needs to be. I live in a high-desert environment and constantly run into soaked logs and destroyed containers.

 

Here's a great video

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more the 75% of the plastic containers I have found (havent found many) have all been wet inside from condensation, even the lock-n-locks I have found, the only ones i have found dry inside are ammo cans. Anything to prevent condensation build up? how about those "do not eat" silica pouches that are put in every box you buy, the silica sucks up the mositure.

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more the 75% of the plastic containers I have found (havent found many) have all been wet inside from condensation, even the lock-n-locks I have found, the only ones i have found dry inside are ammo cans. Anything to prevent condensation build up? how about those "do not eat" silica pouches that are put in every box you buy, the silica sucks up the mositure.

 

I've been thinking about using tubes for fizzy tablets. They usually have some kind of drying agent in the lid to prevent the medicine from starting to fizz too early. One of my friend leaves pouches like that in caches.

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definitely depends on the location.

 

sometimes, I've seen containers "doubled up" to keep the contents secure. usually it's done for camo purposes, but it works quite well to protect against the elements.

 

The outer container isn't a waterproof one, but it's durable and it blocks most of the moisture. The inner container would have the tighter seal against the remaining moisture.

 

polycarbonate plastic bottles don't always work, either. They seem to have a tendency to crack when it gets cold.

 

It just depends on the environmental conditions where you are located. I think that's one big reason why folks should wait to hide them until they've found a bunch...over the course of finding others' caches, you see trends in what works and what does not work.

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Is there some sort of etiquite or standard expected in the choice of cannister one uses ?

I think anything goes, as long as it will stand up to the weather. If you can't dunk it in a bucket of water, then it will not stand up to the rain.

 

Actually the bucket of water test is not a good one. . . . The shower test is the best quick test, alternating hot and cold water and holding the cache in different positions under the water. Still, it's not perfect. The only good test is the real world and experience tells us that metal tins do not work well.

 

 

My water test is to put a dry tissue in the container, close it and run it through the dishwasher. When done, dry the outside of the container, open it and see if the tissue is still dry.

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My water test is to put a dry tissue in the container, close it and run it through the dishwasher. When done, dry the outside of the container, open it and see if the tissue is still dry.

 

Oh, good one!

 

I'm planing a cache for when I find a good location and the camouflage I have in mind will most likely make the cache damp to soggy most of the time. Is that just begging for trouble or do you think I can find a container that could work in those conditions?

 

The camouflage itself will get wet and retain moisture... But it's such a good idea... :/

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