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Contraption cache


EraSeek
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what the heck is that? it looks photoshoped.. but maybe not

 

by the way, I was curious about your reference to Alnilam's caches (you misspelled his/her name), so I looked them up.. those look like must do caches..

 

It's partially photoshopped. The machine is not shown to scale. It's pasted on a background with a different perspective to make it look bigger.

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what the heck is that? it looks photoshoped.. but maybe not

 

by the way, I was curious about your reference to Alnilam's caches (you misspelled his/her name), so I looked them up.. those look like must do caches..

 

It's partially photoshopped. The machine is not shown to scale. It's pasted on a background with a different perspective to make it look bigger.

I'm afraid you're incorrect about the scale. It is that large. When it is settled in it has a conveyor system that carries the raw material back to the powerplant for processing. Each bucket on the head can dig out almost 8 cubic yards of material. It was on one of of those Engineering Marvels programs.

 

Here's a larger picture of it in action.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/comm...-garzweiler.jpg

 

By February 2001, the excavator had completely exposed the coal source at the Tagebau Hambach mine and was no longer needed there. In three weeks it made a 22 kilometer (14 mile) trip to the Garzweiler mine, traveling across Autobahn 61, the river Erft, a railroad line, and several roads. The move cost nearly 150 million German marks and required a team of seventy workers. Rivers were crossed by placing large steel pipes for the water to flow through and providing a smooth surface over the pipes with rocks and gravel. Special grass was seeded to smooth its passage over valuable terrain. Moving Bagger 288 in one piece was more economical than disassembling the excavator and moving it piece by piece.

 

The large surface area of the tracks means the ground pressure of the Bagger 288 is very small allowing the excavator to travel over gravel, earth and even grass without leaving a significant track. It has a minimum turning radius of approximately 100 meters, and can climb a maximum gradient of 1:18.

Edited by TotemLake
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what the heck is that? it looks photoshoped.. but maybe not

 

by the way, I was curious about your reference to Alnilam's caches (you misspelled his/her name), so I looked them up.. those look like must do caches..

 

It's partially photoshopped. The machine is not shown to scale. It's pasted on a background with a different perspective to make it look bigger.

I'm afraid you're incorrect about the scale. It is that large. When it is settled in it has a conveyor system that carries the raw material back to the powerplant for processing. Each bucket on the head can dig out almost 8 cubic yards of material. It was on one of of those Engineering Marvels programs.

 

Here's a larger picture of it in action.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/comm...-garzweiler.jpg

 

By February 2001, the excavator had completely exposed the coal source at the Tagebau Hambach mine and was no longer needed there. In three weeks it made a 22 kilometer (14 mile) trip to the Garzweiler mine, traveling across Autobahn 61, the river Erft, a railroad line, and several roads. The move cost nearly 150 million German marks and required a team of seventy workers. Rivers were crossed by placing large steel pipes for the water to flow through and providing a smooth surface over the pipes with rocks and gravel. Special grass was seeded to smooth its passage over valuable terrain. Moving Bagger 288 in one piece was more economical than disassembling the excavator and moving it piece by piece.

 

The large surface area of the tracks means the ground pressure of the Bagger 288 is very small allowing the excavator to travel over gravel, earth and even grass without leaving a significant track. It has a minimum turning radius of approximately 100 meters, and can climb a maximum gradient of 1:18.

Ok, count me proven wrong.

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What makes these two caches phenomenal? This inquiring mind wants to know :unsure:

 

check out their descriptions, you'll get the idea

 

Can't view their descriptions because I'm not a PM yet, hence the Q's B)

 

ah.. well then that's privileged information then now isn't it ;^)

 

let's just say there is a series of tasks you have to complete involving electro/mechanical devices of some sort

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What makes these two caches phenomenal? This inquiring mind wants to know :unsure:

 

check out their descriptions, you'll get the idea

 

Can't view their descriptions because I'm not a PM yet, hence the Q's B)

 

ah.. well then that's privileged information then now isn't it ;^)

 

let's just say there is a series of tasks you have to complete involving electro/mechanical devices of some sort

What he said, sortof. The two caches are famous because they are amazing, creative contraptions that are a treat to play with and suss out. Alnilam spent a lot of time thinking up the concepts (both involve basic physics principles) and figuring out how to make them work.

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