Jump to content

Geocaching validation!


meesterbaumer
Followers 0

Recommended Posts

Why don't they implement a system similar to travel bugs where upon finding the actual cache you must write a distinct code that would either accept or reject your log post similar to posting a trackable!!

This would guarantee people actually do visit the cache

At this point I could pretend to have found a cache and post a log

Edited by meesterbaumer
Link to comment

At this point I could pretend to have found a cache and sign the log.

 

if that's what makes you "happy" go for it

the vast majority adhere by the guidelines and log as found only those caches where they signed the log

 

on the other hand would be interesting to see how many would still do hundreds of caches a day

Edited by t4e
Link to comment

At this point I could pretend to have found a cache and post a log

 

You could. PowerCachingLtd pretended they found my caches and logged them ... for a couple hours then I exercised the power of the click. And if I think you falsely logged my caches I would also exercise the power of the click.

Link to comment
Why don't they implement a system similar to travel bugs where upon finding the actual cache you must write a distinct code that would either accept or reject your log post similar to posting a trackable!!

This would guarantee people actually do visit the cache

At this point I could pretend to have found a cache and post a log

 

Actually, there used to be a type of cache that did require logging of a codeword that was in the cache, but that has since been disallowed. Perhaps someone with more experience than I can explain why, but I am sure there were very good reasons.

 

But more importantly, why do you care so much about people claiming finds that they perhaps did not make?

Link to comment

Actually I think it would be the same as it is for cheaters now.

 

After a while cheating gets boring. There's no point to logging the caches online.

 

It is often about a sense of accomplishment when seeing your final tally of caches.

 

There is no sense of accomplishment when you cheat. There gets to be no point.

 

It seems most who cheat at this game only do it for a short time. It gets boring.

Link to comment

The current system is much more verifiable then a code system.

 

If the cache owner is concerned about whether a find is valid, they check the log for a signature.

 

Codes can be shared.

 

Codeword caches went away for a couple of reasons, one of them being that they allowed the creation of graffiti caches: write "waypoint" on a guardrail, email the codeword to the cache owner - that's the "cache". Or use existing graffiti, or words, numbers or phrases from signs. Ie, they could be a form of virtual.

Link to comment

I was playing Scrabble with this group of senior citizens and I won because I played the word 'XZQQZXLLDRBB" on a Triple Word score. They all got mad and said we should check a dictionary to prove whether it was a real word or not. I told them, "We could do that, but why do you care so much about people using words that are perhaps not real words?"

Link to comment

I was playing Scrabble with this group of senior citizens and I won because I played the word 'XZQQZXLLDRBB" on a Triple Word score. They all got mad and said we should check a dictionary to prove whether it was a real word or not. I told them, "We could do that, but why do you care so much about people using words that are perhaps not real words?"

 

Scrabble has rules and the point is to win.

 

Geocaching has guidelines and the point is variable from cacher to cacher.

 

See the difference?

Link to comment

I was playing Scrabble with this group of senior citizens and I won because I played the word 'XZQQZXLLDRBB" on a Triple Word score. They all got mad and said we should check a dictionary to prove whether it was a real word or not. I told them, "We could do that, but why do you care so much about people using words that are perhaps not real words?"

 

Scrabble has rules and the point is to win.

 

Geocaching has guidelines and the point is variable from cacher to cacher.

 

See the difference?

 

I agree with you about Scrabble being a game that has rules and the point is to win but,

Geocaching has "guidelines".

These "guidelines" that are not rules can make a cache that you hide not posted on this site because it does not fit the "guidelines".

 

There are several "guidelines" that can define what is allowed in this game.

 

Can someone tell me how the "guidelines" are different than rules?

 

The old "these are guidelines and not rules" saying is getting a bit silly.

 

It's like me creating a "guideline" on my cache page saying you must take a picture of you in a clown suit.

Then saying it isn't an ALR, it's just a "guideline".

Link to comment

Not sure what the big deal is. Scrabble is a game that you aim to "win". Geocashing is not a game where anyone "wins"...nor does anyone "lose". I play it for personal fulfillment.

 

If a number cruncher wants to falsely inflate their finds...who is that person really hurting? We're mostly adults...aren't we? Are we *really* going to waste time pointing our fingers and yelling "YOU CHEAT!?" or spend hours pouring over paper logs and matching them up with the online logs while zealously tapping the delete key? Boy, some people have WAY too much time on their hands. lol

 

I've seen some people who claim to have thousands of finds. Mayhaps they do..and mayhaps they don't...but it's not my business to delve into their personal issues with competitiveness.

Link to comment

I was playing Scrabble with this group of senior citizens and I won because I played the word 'XZQQZXLLDRBB" on a Triple Word score. They all got mad and said we should check a dictionary to prove whether it was a real word or not. I told them, "We could do that, but why do you care so much about people using words that are perhaps not real words?"

 

Scrabble has rules and the point is to win.

 

Geocaching has guidelines and the point is variable from cacher to cacher.

 

See the difference?

 

I agree with you about Scrabble being a game that has rules and the point is to win but,

Geocaching has "guidelines".

These "guidelines" that are not rules can make a cache that you hide not posted on this site because it does not fit the "guidelines".

 

There are several "guidelines" that can define what is allowed in this game.

 

Can someone tell me how the "guidelines" are different than rules?

 

The old "these are guidelines and not rules" saying is getting a bit silly.

 

It's like me creating a "guideline" on my cache page saying you must take a picture of you in a clown suit.

Then saying it isn't an ALR, it's just a "guideline".

 

Some guidelines have softer boundaries that others. The "no ALR" guideline and the distance guidelines are pretty tough to get around.

 

Some guidelines are not actively inspected for compliance in some cases. In most cases a reviewer won't require you to shoe written permission for cache placement- but due to some circumstances they sometimes will.

 

That's the difference in rules and guidelines. The reviewers have more latitude and discretion with guidelines and sometimes due to circumstances one guideline may become more like a hard rule than it would in other instances.

 

Guidelines are more... fuzzy.

Link to comment

I was playing Scrabble with this group of senior citizens and I won because I played the word 'XZQQZXLLDRBB" on a Triple Word score. They all got mad and said we should check a dictionary to prove whether it was a real word or not. I told them, "We could do that, but why do you care so much about people using words that are perhaps not real words?"

I was playing Scrabble and used a made up word. None of the other players thought to challenge the word so there was no need to consult the dictionary and my made up word counted.

 

In much the same fashion the cache owner is given the responsibility to ensure quality control of posts to the cache page. Ultimately it is up to the cache owners to determine whether to delete a find log because the log wasn't signed. The fact is that most cache owners are willing to accept someone's word that they found the cache and aren't going to check logs or insist on validation codes. Unlike Scrabble, where a challenging a word can effect the outcome of the game, allowing a bogus log to stand only effects other cachers in some rare instances. The find count is not a score - so the fact that someone has an extra find has less effect than if someone played an illegal word in Scrabble that didn't get challenged. Placing an additional logging requirement of a verification code in order to log a find seems a bit more than is needed to ensure the play of the game. Cache owners can already delete logs that appear to be bogus. Then can check the physical log if they need any more confirmation. Requiring cachers to remember the codes for a bunch of caches would be akin to requiring Scrabble players to show each word they use is in the dictionary when they play it.

Link to comment

Why don't they implement a system similar to travel bugs where upon finding the actual cache you must write a distinct code that would either accept or reject your log post similar to posting a trackable!!

This would guarantee people actually do visit the cache

At this point I could pretend to have found a cache and post a log

 

That would guarantee I log the same caches as my friends who had conveniently copied down the code for me.

Link to comment

Why don't they implement a system similar to travel bugs where upon finding the actual cache you must write a distinct code that would either accept or reject your log post similar to posting a trackable!!

This would guarantee people actually do visit the cache

At this point I could pretend to have found a cache and post a log

 

That would guarantee I log the same caches as my friends who had conveniently copied down the code for me.

 

Actually, there's one like that on my Ten-Mile List.

This cache is the size of a 35mm film canister with a metal travel bug tag attached.

...

When you find the cache, please add your name to the log, please do not remove the tag. If the log container is lost or damaged from high water you can still get credit for the find by emailing the log owner the number embossed on the metal tag.

Last two finders (9 of 09) only found the TB tag. DNF 08 of this year. CO hasn't logged in in nine months.

But, it's an old cache. I guess that was permitted back then.

Link to comment

ok, let's assume for a minute you placed a really good cache. scenic hike, nature at its best, panoramic view, top quality container, loads of trinkets and trackables available.

 

john doe places a fake "found it" on your cache. didn't bother to take out his bottom of the couch to log it. clicked the button and increased his count. you took so much effort into hiding the cache. he didn't get to witness all of that and to enjoy the walk and the view and whatever you wanted people to. that's his problem. his loss.

 

on the other hand, someone who took the time to study your clear instructions on how to get to the cache, saw the appetizer pictures for the whole scenic thing and walked his boots off, found the cache, signed the log and then logged the cache and thanked you for the fun you provided him. you both win.

 

why bother if someone gets satisfaction on cheating and increasing his numbers using your caches? he's the one that's missing all the fun.

Link to comment

I was playing Scrabble with this group of senior citizens and I won because I played the word 'XZQQZXLLDRBB" on a Triple Word score. They all got mad and said we should check a dictionary to prove whether it was a real word or not. I told them, "We could do that, but why do you care so much about people using words that are perhaps not real words?"

 

Scrabble has rules and the point is to win.

 

Geocaching has guidelines and the point is variable from cacher to cacher.

 

See the difference?

 

Some people play Scrabble and other board games to pass time or spend quality time with family and friends and don't give a clam's patootie about winning.

 

Some people geoache as if the person who dies with the most finds wins.

Link to comment

As already stated, codewords get shared around.

Co-ordinates for the final of multis get shared around.

Solutions to puzzles get shared around.

 

As for the game analogy (Scrabble or whatever), everyone has their own idea of what winning means.

For me, each cache is a little game between me and the owner. If I find it, I win, if not, I don't win. (Actually now that I think about it, this applies mostly to urban caching. There are many cases where I may not find the cache at the top of the mountain with a beautiful view of the lake and still feel like I won. :ph34r: )

Link to comment

Adding codes as proof will result in folks not bothering to log at all - because they must keep up with the code and maybe lose it before time to log a visit. You might miss out on some really neat comments about your cache that would better prove the finder had a great day caching. I just wish everyone would tell me about their outing while going or coming from the cache. It IS my goal that they got off the couch and had a great day in a wonderful place that perhaps they have never seen and will remember for some time. "THAT IS CACHING" "TAKE ME SOMEWHERE".

 

AND THANKS TO ALL OF YOU WHO DID!

Edited by GPS-Hermit
Link to comment

It's like me creating a "guideline" on my cache page saying you must take a picture of you in a clown suit.

Then saying it isn't an ALR, it's just a "guideline".

Guidelines have some wiggle-room, which can be applied at the reviewer's discretion. Your example "guideline" stopped being a guideline when you used the word "must". That makes it a rule.

 

To continue with your board game analogy: If you come up a dollar short in Monopoly, you're out of the game. Period. That's because the game has rules. But if you come up a foot short when placing your cache, it may still be published. Got it?

Link to comment

It's like me creating a "guideline" on my cache page saying you must take a picture of you in a clown suit.

Then saying it isn't an ALR, it's just a "guideline".

Guidelines have some wiggle-room, which can be applied at the reviewer's discretion. Your example "guideline" stopped being a guideline when you used the word "must". That makes it a rule.

 

To continue with your board game analogy: If you come up a dollar short in Monopoly, you're out of the game. Period. That's because the game has rules. But if you come up a foot short when placing your cache, it may still be published. Got it?

 

No need for rudeness.

 

The word "must" is used in the same context in the guidelines.

Does that make the "guideline" a rule?

 

And the board game analogy was not mine. I merely commented on it.

It's OK though. Everybody makes mistakes. :blink:

Link to comment

Why don't they implement a system similar to travel bugs where upon finding the actual cache you must write a distinct code that would either accept or reject your log post similar to posting a trackable!!

This would guarantee people actually do visit the cache

At this point I could pretend to have found a cache and post a log

 

Just another puritan wanting excess controls on something that should be just for fun.

 

Does your car ask for a 10 digit code everytime you sit down in it to make sure it you you that is really driving it?

 

Does your house have an electronic lock that requires a passcode to get in to verify it is you?

 

Does the local carnival have a fingerprint scanner that matches your drivers license to make sure you are who you say you are just to ride the rides or visit any events?

 

See how stupid it all sounds? Just let people have fun, and if theres a question about somneone finding your cache, match the written log with the online log.... just remember that not everyone uses the same info on paper that they do on the website... Sometimes I use kzrclan if I am geocaching with my daughter instead of my website name...

Link to comment

Why don't they implement a system similar to travel bugs where upon finding the actual cache you must write a distinct code that would either accept or reject your log post similar to posting a trackable!!

This would guarantee people actually do visit the cache

At this point I could pretend to have found a cache and post a log

 

Just another puritan wanting excess controls on something that should be just for fun.

 

Does your car ask for a 10 digit code everytime you sit down in it to make sure it you you that is really driving it?

 

Does your house have an electronic lock that requires a passcode to get in to verify it is you?

 

Does the local carnival have a fingerprint scanner that matches your drivers license to make sure you are who you say you are just to ride the rides or visit any events?

 

See how stupid it all sounds? Just let people have fun, and if theres a question about somneone finding your cache, match the written log with the online log.... just remember that not everyone uses the same info on paper that they do on the website... Sometimes I use kzrclan if I am geocaching with my daughter instead of my website name...

 

Calling someone a "puritan" is a bit insulting.

 

Cars need keys to start them.

Homes need keys to enter them.

 

See how normal that sounds?

Link to comment

I understand what he and you mean, but if he wants to do that, he may as well say "cache requires a key to a padlock that only I have" so he knows and sees every single person that actually finds and wants to log their visit.... otherwise it is useless and excessive controls on what is supposed to be a fun event/passing of time. Adding the extra controls turns more people away from it, then these same people that demanded more controls start complaining that no one finds any caches anymore... its a slippery slope that is best ignored and a path best not taken.

Link to comment

Sometimes a lack of control takes away from the fun. Puritans were good people.

 

Unless you lived in Salem and were accused of witchcraft.

 

Fortunately Groundspeak has not seen fit to implement validation codes. I have enough problem with TB codes and would probably devote my time to other location-based games if I haf to go through one more hoop.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 0
×
×
  • Create New...