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Debi55

High School Field trip

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Our high school has a field trip day every year.

I was wondering how to incorporate geocaching.

 

If I were to assume 20 students and we went to an area, I could assign them to groups, but the hard part would be to keep them secretive.

 

Any suggestions on how to plan about a 3 hour field trip. Of course we can take up time by having lunch outside

 

Thanks,

Deb

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Our high school has a field trip day every year.

I was wondering how to incorporate geocaching.

 

If I were to assume 20 students and we went to an area, I could assign them to groups, but the hard part would be to keep them secretive.

 

Any suggestions on how to plan about a 3 hour field trip. Of course we can take up time by having lunch outside

 

Thanks,

Deb

 

Add something to make it competitive in nature to help urge the students to not 'share' with the other teams. Some sort of small prizes for the winning team is a good motivator too. I'll give more details below.

 

I would also of course suggest using your own temporary caches for such a group (versus hunting regular published caches). Obviously you know your kids and will know whether there would be a potential for muggling caches or otherwise causing problems with regular published caches. I say this only because I recently did a day long hunt at a state park with a group of college students and had a problem with one of the teams moving caches away from their coordinates (Yep - college students).

 

So here's what I did for my 'event' that I did for our students.

 

I setup a 'course' with a number of caches that I thought would keep the groups busy for the specified amount of time (I think we had 2 or 3 hours total for the hunt and a brief presentation). The course consisted of real world examples of real Geocaches, various types (traditional and puzzle) and various types (micro, small, regular) using typical containers (beach safes, lock n locks and ammo cans).

 

The 'game' I used was 'GeoClue' and was based on the old game of clue. The students had booklets that I made up that had cache descriptions pages, and a list of crimes, suspects and places that they would mark off their list as they found clue cards in the caches. I happened to use my own home-made clue cards that had pictures of people, places and things related to our college campus and were relevant to our faculty, staff and location - making it more fun for our students.

 

My booklet that I made had 'cache pages' designed to look like the web pages on the GC.com website complete with descriptions, coords, distance from home coords (our picnic shelter), encrypted clue (with decryption key) and a place to make notes and mark as found or dnf. The booklet turned out really cool and I ended up using a similar one for a GeoPoker Leadership event I did a few months later.

 

We did a shotgun start where each team (or 4 or 5 students) was given a Geocache that they had to start at. After making their first find they could then hunt the remainder in any order. If you can spread them out it works better. I only had one spot where I had a bottleneck and had groups that were running up on each other a few times.

 

At the end of the game we gathered back at the picnic shelter and each team submitted their guess as to who did it, with what and where (everyone got it right by the simple process of elimination). The team that finished the course with the fastest time and the correct answer was the winning team and all got a prize. I also was lucky enough to have prizes donated by local business and industry (and the recruiting offices of our national guard) that we also did a drawing and everyone ended up getting at least a little something.

 

If you are interested I'd be happy to share some of the materials I developed, rules that I used, etc.

 

I mentioned my GeoPoker event as well. It was basically the same except I used poker chips in the caches. Each chip was marked with the GC number of the event cache (I used made up numbers like GC001, GC002, etc) and the teams would take one chip and sign the log when they found a cache. I also mixed in some Joker chips that they could use as wild cards. At the end of the hunt everyone met back at the picnic shelter and traded each chip that they found for cards drawn randomly from several decks of cards (had too many teams and caches to use just one deck). If they found a Joker chip they could use it to get a Joker card and make the Joker wild. They made the best poker hand they could with all the cards they drew, and we determined a winner.

 

Both events were a great success and everyone had a blast.

 

I will warn you however - it takes lots of planning to choose all your spots, makeup your containers and materials, place them before the event starts, run the event, collect you containers after the event, etc, etc, etc. But it was worth it to share Geocaching with all those people and see everyone have so much fun.

 

Oh - I almost forgot! Both of my events integrated CITO into the day's hunt. Participants were given plastic grocery bags to take out on the trails to collect trash. The student event yielded enough trash to fill a 55 gallon trash can which wasn't bad considering our group.

 

Good luck with your high school group.

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On 10/1/2010 at 9:47 AM, Jeep4two said:

 

Add something to make it competitive in nature to help urge the students to not 'share' with the other teams. Some sort of small prizes for the winning team is a good motivator too. I'll give more details below.

 

I would also of course suggest using your own temporary caches for such a group (versus hunting regular published caches). Obviously you know your kids and will know whether there would be a potential for muggling caches or otherwise causing problems with regular published caches. I say this only because I recently did a day long hunt at a state park with a group of college students and had a problem with one of the teams moving caches away from their coordinates (Yep - college students).

 

So here's what I did for my 'event' that I did for our students.

 

I setup a 'course' with a number of caches that I thought would keep the groups busy for the specified amount of time (I think we had 2 or 3 hours total for the hunt and a brief presentation). The course consisted of real world examples of real Geocaches, various types (traditional and puzzle) and various types (micro, small, regular) using typical containers (beach safes, lock n locks and ammo cans).

 

The 'game' I used was 'GeoClue' and was based on the old game of clue. The students had booklets that I made up that had cache descriptions pages, and a list of crimes, suspects and places that they would mark off their list as they found clue cards in the caches. I happened to use my own home-made clue cards that had pictures of people, places and things related to our college campus and were relevant to our faculty, staff and location - making it more fun for our students.

 

My booklet that I made had 'cache pages' designed to look like the web pages on the GC.com website complete with descriptions, coords, distance from home coords (our picnic shelter), encrypted clue (with decryption key) and a place to make notes and mark as found or dnf. The booklet turned out really cool and I ended up using a similar one for a GeoPoker Leadership event I did a few months later.

 

We did a shotgun start where each team (or 4 or 5 students) was given a Geocache that they had to start at. After making their first find they could then hunt the remainder in any order. If you can spread them out it works better. I only had one spot where I had a bottleneck and had groups that were running up on each other a few times.

 

At the end of the game we gathered back at the picnic shelter and each team submitted their guess as to who did it, with what and where (everyone got it right by the simple process of elimination). The team that finished the course with the fastest time and the correct answer was the winning team and all got a prize. I also was lucky enough to have prizes donated by local business and industry (and the recruiting offices of our national guard) that we also did a drawing and everyone ended up getting at least a little something.

 

If you are interested I'd be happy to share some of the materials I developed, rules that I used, etc.

 

I mentioned my GeoPoker event as well. It was basically the same except I used poker chips in the caches. Each chip was marked with the GC number of the event cache (I used made up numbers like GC001, GC002, etc) and the teams would take one chip and sign the log when they found a cache. I also mixed in some Joker chips that they could use as wild cards. At the end of the hunt everyone met back at the picnic shelter and traded each chip that they found for cards drawn randomly from several decks of cards (had too many teams and caches to use just one deck). If they found a Joker chip they could use it to get a Joker card and make the Joker wild. They made the best poker hand they could with all the cards they drew, and we determined a winner.

 

Both events were a great success and everyone had a blast.

 

I will warn you however - it takes lots of planning to choose all your spots, makeup your containers and materials, place them before the event starts, run the event, collect you containers after the event, etc, etc, etc. But it was worth it to share Geocaching with all those people and see everyone have so much fun.

 

Oh - I almost forgot! Both of my events integrated CITO into the day's hunt. Participants were given plastic grocery bags to take out on the trails to collect trash. The student event yielded enough trash to fill a 55 gallon trash can which wasn't bad considering our group.

 

Good luck with your high school group.

I'm trying to work geocaching in to some lessons and would love to see some of your materials to get an idea. I can work on the creation of it over the summer and maybe have an intro day on day one so that I can get students excited.

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