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Translation, please!


guiderchachi
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I am getting ready for a trip from Newfoundland that includes some stops in Quebec. I have found a cache near one of the campgrounds that I will be staying at but it is all in french.

 

This is the description:

Attache ta tuque, le vent vient de loin

La cache comprends

Les explications pour géomoldus

Un log book ( apporter votre crayon )

Un grateux pour le PAT

 

This is what babelfish gives me:

Your tuque attaches, the wind comes by far the hiding place include/understand Explanations for géomoldus A log book (to bring your pencil) grateux for the STALEMATE

 

This is what Bing! gives me:

Attaches ta tuque, wind has by far the cache understand Explanations for géomoldus A log book (bring your pencil) A grateux for the PAT

 

All I can figure out is that there is a logbook and I have to bring my own pencil. I don't need a translator to know that!

 

Can someone help me please?

Thanks in advance,

Guiderchachi

(confused anglophone wishing I had more than high school French!)

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I am getting ready for a trip from Newfoundland that includes some stops in Quebec. I have found a cache near one of the campgrounds that I will be staying at but it is all in french.

 

This is the description:

Attache ta tuque, le vent vient de loin

La cache comprends

Les explications pour géomoldus

Un log book ( apporter votre crayon )

Un grateux pour le PAT

 

This is what babelfish gives me:

Your tuque attaches, the wind comes by far the hiding place include/understand Explanations for géomoldus A log book (to bring your pencil) grateux for the STALEMATE

 

This is what Bing! gives me:

Attaches ta tuque, wind has by far the cache understand Explanations for géomoldus A log book (bring your pencil) A grateux for the PAT

 

All I can figure out is that there is a logbook and I have to bring my own pencil. I don't need a translator to know that!

 

Can someone help me please?

Thanks in advance,

Guiderchachi

(confused anglophone wishing I had more than high school French!)

http://www.google.com/webmasters/igoogle/t...h%20translation

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I am getting ready for a trip from Newfoundland that includes some stops in Quebec. I have found a cache near one of the campgrounds that I will be staying at but it is all in french.

 

This is the description:

Attache ta tuque, le vent vient de loin

La cache comprends

Les explications pour géomoldus

Un log book ( apporter votre crayon )

Un grateux pour le PAT

 

This is what babelfish gives me:

Your tuque attaches, the wind comes by far the hiding place include/understand Explanations for géomoldus A log book (to bring your pencil) grateux for the STALEMATE

 

This is what Bing! gives me:

Attaches ta tuque, wind has by far the cache understand Explanations for géomoldus A log book (bring your pencil) A grateux for the PAT

 

All I can figure out is that there is a logbook and I have to bring my own pencil. I don't need a translator to know that!

 

Can someone help me please?

Thanks in advance,

Guiderchachi

(confused anglophone wishing I had more than high school French!)

 

The description says:

 

Put on your toque, the wind blows from far

The cache contains

An explanation for muggles

A logbook (Bring your own pencil)

A prize for the first to find

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At one time, 65 years ago, French was my only language. My,... have times changed. There are very many new words in the language, ...both languages. Re this listing: In both languages, descriptions are often cryptic, and logs sometimes facetious. Computerized translations can't understand such stuff, only real people can. This cache is a very easy cache to find. Everyone who looked for it found it. "Easily found, impossible to miss." "A windy location; the wind howls across the fields. Pull down your toque over our ears in the winter." "The farmer must wonder why so many people are interested in his tree." "Co-ords are right on." "A drive-up cache." From what I can read of the logs, there are cattle in the nearby field, and an electric fence nearby, so don't touch the wire. Bring a pencil. "Un grateux pour le PAT", I believe refers to the need for sand or chains on certain winter days when the road is like a skating rink', or "une patinoire". One of the French speaking campers at the nearby camp-ground wasn't too happy with his stay there, but others had no compaints. I sometimes use Google-Translate myself, both ways, but I always have to make my own corrections afterwards, so it makes proper sense. Hope this helps. Remember, a smile is the best aid to any transation. There will always be someone around in the area who can help out. <_< Enjoy your trip.

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I think that Maddy is probably right, in that PAT means "premiere a trouve", or FTF in English. Then, ... "grateau" must be a bad misspelling of "cadeau", or gift.

 

Yes, that's right, PAT is "Premier à Trouver" or FTF in english.

 

A "Grateux" is actually one of those lotto scratch tickets.

 

Some other useful French geocaching terms are "RPRL" (Rien pris rien laissé), in english is TNLN (took nothing left nothing), and MPLC (Merci pour la cache) in english is TFTC (Thanks For The Cache).

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you need an iPhone to use iGoogle? <_<

 

Maybe not, but that link had only images, nothing I could use so I made the assumption that I needed an iPhone. Most iThings need and iSomething in order for it to work. Or again maybe I'm wrong. I have no desire for an iPhone so I have no knowledge of iApplications.

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At one time, 65 years ago, French was my only language. My,... have times changed. There are very many new words in the language, ...both languages. Re this listing: In both languages, descriptions are often cryptic, and logs sometimes facetious. Computerized translations can't understand such stuff, only real people can. This cache is a very easy cache to find. Everyone who looked for it found it. "Easily found, impossible to miss." "A windy location; the wind howls across the fields. Pull down your toque over our ears in the winter." "The farmer must wonder why so many people are interested in his tree." "Co-ords are right on." "A drive-up cache." From what I can read of the logs, there are cattle in the nearby field, and an electric fence nearby, so don't touch the wire. Bring a pencil. "Un grateux pour le PAT", I believe refers to the need for sand or chains on certain winter days when the road is like a skating rink', or "une patinoire". One of the French speaking campers at the nearby camp-ground wasn't too happy with his stay there, but others had no compaints. I sometimes use Google-Translate myself, both ways, but I always have to make my own corrections afterwards, so it makes proper sense. Hope this helps. Remember, a smile is the best aid to any transation. There will always be someone around in the area who can help out. <_< Enjoy your trip.

 

Thanks. I know it has been found a lot and that it is easy. I just like being able to have a little idea of what I may be looking for and no matter how many times I tried to translate it, it didn't work for me.

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