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BRING BACK VIRTUAL CACHE


kyler123
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:)

 

Edit: Seriously though... this topic REALLY has been brought up a lot, and Groundspeak has a pretty firm stance on it. Not only that, but it's discussed on geocaching podcasts far and wide, pretty much all over the place; that's the reason for the facepalm post I think.

 

Don't take it personally.

Edited by nymphnsatyr
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dose anyone agree that virtual cache should come back instead of begin grandfather caches

 

i know this topic has probably been brought up 100 times but i just wanna see if anyone agrees

Well, since many of us haven't listened to all the podcasts or seen this topic discussed, I think its a good subject. I've always wondered why they were banned. I've enjoyed the one's I've found.

 

Anyone care to add a link to a previous thread?

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:)

 

Edit: Seriously though... this topic REALLY has been brought up a lot, and Groundspeak has a pretty firm stance on it. Not only that, but it's discussed on geocaching podcasts far and wide, pretty much all over the place; that's the reason for the facepalm post I think.

 

Don't take it personally.

 

Perhaps for those of us who are newer, you could explain their stance and reasoning?

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Ni!

 

Ni! +1

 

-1

-1(-1)

 

Bassanio, I LOVE that your sig line says Blast Hardcheese. I love it! MST 3K is our favorite show of all time!

 

In regards to old threads, a suggestion that I have, since the search function on the forum doesn't work that well, is to go to Google and search for a thread with the subject you are curious about. It works pretty well. If you are curious, just look it up; I don't think it's the responsibility of those who have discussed it many times over to look it up for you. I'm not trying to be mean... just sayin'

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Seriously, just about all don't want to see them to come back and the subject comes up 3-4 times a month.

 

On the contrary, many of us DO want to see them return. But Groundspeak has made it clear over and over that it ain't happening. They even went so far as to build a completely different site call Waymarking.com in order to have a place to push people who want the virtual experience.

 

We can argue all day how much fun they are and how we want them, but it does not change the fact that Groundspeak is FIRM in their stance.

 

Virtual Cache?

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:)

 

Edit: Seriously though... this topic REALLY has been brought up a lot, and Groundspeak has a pretty firm stance on it. Not only that, but it's discussed on geocaching podcasts far and wide, pretty much all over the place; that's the reason for the facepalm post I think.

 

Don't take it personally.

 

Perhaps for those of us who are newer, you could explain their stance and reasoning?

 

Oh, Mr. T has a long famous (and very good) post which I'm sure he'll come along and post shortly.

 

Basically a de-facto ban, the so called "WOW Factor" period was put in place in May or June of 2003, and lasted until the Summer of 2005, when Waymarking.com was unleashed on the World. After that, no new ones were accepted, period. During this 2+ year period, it was extremely difficult to get one approved anyways.

 

Why were they discontinued? I suppose too many lame ones were being submitted. I myself believe they would have over-run the game, and become the most dominant cache type, with every historical marker in the entire U.S. being a virtual cache by now. Talk about the ultimate cheap and dirty, no maintenance required, Geocache. Not to say some great ones were not placed.

 

Also many believe that many Park Systems would have used them as an excuse to ban physical Geocaches, and allow only virtuals. Many State Parks and such were just starting to come out with Geocaching Permit policies in 2003 and 2004. Not that I believe this had anything to do with the decision, but it's a good point that is often raised.

Edited by TheWhiteUrkel
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...Isn't an earthcache basically a "virtual" anyway? what's the difference?

 

The difference is that an Earthcache is supposed to teach a geologically significant lesson, and they are reviewed with different specifications than virtuals were. In fact, when they are submitted, they are submitted through earthcache.org

 

These are the guidelines for submittal, as copied and pasted from earthcache.org

 

1. EarthCache sites must provide Earth science lessons. They take people to sites that can help explain the formation of landscapes or to sites of interesting phenomena such as folds, faults, intrusions or reveal how scientists understand our Earth (such as fossil sites etc.)

2. EarthCache sites must be educational. They provide accurate but simple explanations of what visitors will experience at the site. Cache text must assume no previous knowledge of earth science. The educational notes must be written to a reading age of an upper middle school (14 year old) student. Avoid direct plagiarism from web sources and quote sources of information where appropriate. Additional technical or scientific notes can be provided for the scientific community at the end of the listing. All notes can be submitted in the local language but must also be in English.

3. EarthCache sites can be a single site, or a multiple virtual cache. No items, box, or physical cache can be left at the site. You must have visited the site recently (within two months), checked the site is safe and taken multiple GPS readings to ensure accuracy of coordinates. You are responsible for disabling an EarthCache if conditions change to access, safety or other issues.

4. EarthCaches should highlight a unique feature. EarthCaches that duplicate existing EarthCache information about the site or related sites may be rejected. EarthCaches should be developed to provide a unique experience to the visitor to the region. Multiple EarthCaches on the same feature should be avoided and content rather than proximity will be the guiding principle.

5. EarthCache sites follow the geocaching principles and adhere to the principles of Leave No Trace outdoor ethics. Use waypoints to ensure cachers take appropriate pathways. Use established trails only. Do not create new trails to a site in order to concentrate use impacts. EarthCache sites will highlight the principle of collect photos - not samples. However, if there is no possible damage to a site which is outside of the public land system and approved by the site owner, small samples may be collected as part of the cache experience.

6. Logging of an EarthCache must involve visitors undertaking some educational task that relates to the Earth science at the site. This could involve measuring or estimating the size of some feature or aspect of the site, collecting and recording data (such as time of a tidal bore), or sending an e-mail to the cache owner with the answer to Earth science related questions they obtained by reading an information display. While photographs may be requested, they do not take the place of other logging requirements. Taking a photograph alone or asking people to do internet research does NOT meet these logging guidelines. Requests for specific content in the photograph (must include the visitor's face, for example) will be considered an additional logging requirement and must be optional. Cache owners may not delete the cache seeker's log based solely on optional tasks.

7. All EarthCache sites developed must have prior approval of the landowners before submission (depending on local country laws and customs). When applicable you must have written approval with the appropriate owner or land-managing agency. The name and contact details of the person from who you received approval MUST be given at time of submission in the “Note to Reviewer”. The developed text should be sent to the landholder/manager for approval*. * Please note that by placing an EarthCache on public land, even with approval, does not mean you can use the public land logo in your text. For example, only EarthCaches developed by US National Park Service personnel in their park can display the NPS logo in their cache text.

8. All EarthCache sites will be reviewed by the EarthCache Team to ensure appropriateness of the site and educational standard of the notes.

9. Damage to the site is unacceptable. Please be mindful of fragile ecosystems.

10. The Geological Society of America and the EarthCache Team retains the right to edit, modify, reject or archive any EarthCache that does not adhere to these guidelines, or for any other purpose that the Team deems as appropriate.

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...Isn't an earthcache basically a "virtual" anyway? what's the difference?

 

The difference is that an Earthcache is supposed to teach a geologically significant lesson, and they are reviewed with different specifications than virtuals were. In fact, when they are submitted, they are submitted through earthcache.org

 

These are the guidelines for submittal, as copied and pasted from earthcache.org

 

1. EarthCache sites must provide Earth science lessons. They take people to sites that can help explain the formation of landscapes or to sites of interesting phenomena such as folds, faults, intrusions or reveal how scientists understand our Earth (such as fossil sites etc.)

2. EarthCache sites must be educational. They provide accurate but simple explanations of what visitors will experience at the site. Cache text must assume no previous knowledge of earth science. The educational notes must be written to a reading age of an upper middle school (14 year old) student. Avoid direct plagiarism from web sources and quote sources of information where appropriate. Additional technical or scientific notes can be provided for the scientific community at the end of the listing. All notes can be submitted in the local language but must also be in English.

3. EarthCache sites can be a single site, or a multiple virtual cache. No items, box, or physical cache can be left at the site. You must have visited the site recently (within two months), checked the site is safe and taken multiple GPS readings to ensure accuracy of coordinates. You are responsible for disabling an EarthCache if conditions change to access, safety or other issues.

4. EarthCaches should highlight a unique feature. EarthCaches that duplicate existing EarthCache information about the site or related sites may be rejected. EarthCaches should be developed to provide a unique experience to the visitor to the region. Multiple EarthCaches on the same feature should be avoided and content rather than proximity will be the guiding principle.

5. EarthCache sites follow the geocaching principles and adhere to the principles of Leave No Trace outdoor ethics. Use waypoints to ensure cachers take appropriate pathways. Use established trails only. Do not create new trails to a site in order to concentrate use impacts. EarthCache sites will highlight the principle of collect photos - not samples. However, if there is no possible damage to a site which is outside of the public land system and approved by the site owner, small samples may be collected as part of the cache experience.

6. Logging of an EarthCache must involve visitors undertaking some educational task that relates to the Earth science at the site. This could involve measuring or estimating the size of some feature or aspect of the site, collecting and recording data (such as time of a tidal bore), or sending an e-mail to the cache owner with the answer to Earth science related questions they obtained by reading an information display. While photographs may be requested, they do not take the place of other logging requirements. Taking a photograph alone or asking people to do internet research does NOT meet these logging guidelines. Requests for specific content in the photograph (must include the visitor's face, for example) will be considered an additional logging requirement and must be optional. Cache owners may not delete the cache seeker's log based solely on optional tasks.

7. All EarthCache sites developed must have prior approval of the landowners before submission (depending on local country laws and customs). When applicable you must have written approval with the appropriate owner or land-managing agency. The name and contact details of the person from who you received approval MUST be given at time of submission in the “Note to Reviewer”. The developed text should be sent to the landholder/manager for approval*. * Please note that by placing an EarthCache on public land, even with approval, does not mean you can use the public land logo in your text. For example, only EarthCaches developed by US National Park Service personnel in their park can display the NPS logo in their cache text.

8. All EarthCache sites will be reviewed by the EarthCache Team to ensure appropriateness of the site and educational standard of the notes.

9. Damage to the site is unacceptable. Please be mindful of fragile ecosystems.

10. The Geological Society of America and the EarthCache Team retains the right to edit, modify, reject or archive any EarthCache that does not adhere to these guidelines, or for any other purpose that the Team deems as appropriate.

 

I see! Thanks for the clarification :)

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In fact, when they are submitted, they are submitted through earthcache.org

 

Incorrect. Earthcaches are now submitted on Geocaching.com, but they are still reviewed by an Earthcache-specific reviewer.

 

Oh okay, thanks for letting us know! I didn't know that had changed. We're actually working on one to submit (for the Gold Status) so that will help us out I'm sure. :)

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double-facepalm.jpg

 

One suggestion: I know there is a FAQ thread that is very helpful, but how about Frequently Addressed and Rehashed Topics. (Maybe not the best acronym) :)

 

Basically a locked thread that is pinned or a link from a pinned thread that directs to a thread. Maybe it will cut down on topics we see all the time. This will cut down on the annoyance of those of us who have been here, and help the new crowd find answers to why Virtuals are now on a separate site.

 

Would I like to see virtuals allowed back in? Only if the wow factor was applied, and since that caused too many problems then no.

How likely is that to happen? .000000001% and that may be too high

Am I okay with that? Sure it makes the ones still around even more special. I just hope that the continue to survive.

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this is geo caching not a flame war

 

You really believe that? One of the requirements for starting a topic is donning your Nomex suit.

 

This subject has been beat to death many times. It keeps coming back like a zombie movie. Everyone with 20 posts or less thinks they have to bring up this under the "I just thought of it so it must benew since I am such a genius" category.

 

Welcome to the real world.

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I'd like earthcaches a lot better if they didn't have ALRs. I like learning about the various earthcache sites, but I don't appreciate being tested on the info. :)

 

Science is hard. Let's go shopping!

I don't appreciate the snarky remark. I love science, I just don't like researching answers to stupid questions. I'll go back to ignoring you now.

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I love science, I just don't like researching answers to stupid questions. I'll go back to ignoring you now.

 

Science (from Latin: scientia, meaning "knowledge") is a systematic enterprise of gathering knowledge about the world and organizing and condensing that knowledge into testable laws and theories*

 

*Edward Wilson, Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge. New York: Vintage, 1999.

 

I love history... I just don't like researching the past! :)

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A geocache is a container hidden somewhere.

According to the website, a geocache can also be;

 

More than one container, linked by coords.

A roadside plaque (no more new ones allowed, but the old ones are still geocaches)

A container with a stamp in it.

A gathering of nerds for socializing

A container at an unlisted location, which must be deduced somehow

A webcam (no more new ones allowed, but the old ones are still geocaches)

A gathering of nerds for picking up garbage

A sinkhole

A container at an unlisted location, which is located through the application of specific computer software

A gathering of nerds for socializing, that only occurs every decade

 

But not... definitely not, a brass disk stuck in the ground. :)

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