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using google maps to find catches quicker


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For anyone who wants to find caches near an area w/ google maps but need coords:

right click on any spot on the map and select "directions from here"

in the bar on the left it has the coordinates for that point on the map

or use the "what's here" option, which does the same thing, but doesn't try to start routing.

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What part of the word "must" are you having trouble understanding?
There's no misunderstanding. I choose to disobey the Guidelines' instructions on how to obtain accurate coordinates.

 

Let me say it again (have you taken your blood pressure pills?). I CHOOSE TO DISOBEY. *gasp*

:)

 

Fine. Don't be too surprised if a reviewer chooses archive all of your caches because you choose to violate the guidelines,

 

And yes they do read the forums...

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For anyone who wants to find caches near an area w/ google maps but need coords:

right click on any spot on the map and select "directions from here"

in the bar on the left it has the coordinates for that point on the map

 

Note, that if you want the coordinates of a spot on the map, you have to click somewhere away from a road. If you right click near a road, it will provide driving directions to a point on the road "close" to where you've selected, but it won't tell you what the coordinates are. If you click on a spot even a small distance away from a road it'll say something like: "We could not calculate directions between 42.422416,-76.488858 and Ithaca, NY." You'd then have to convert those coordinates to degrees, decimal minutes to use the Hide & Seek a Cache form.

 

It's also worth noting that the resolution of the maps in different places varies significantly. Trying entering a hotel name that I stayed at a couple of months ago (Morogoro Hotel, Morogoro, Tanzania) into Google Maps. The available resolution changes right in the middle of the road where the hotel is located. To the west it would be usable for identifying some fairly small features (for example, a baobab tree that is just outside the lobby of the hotel) but to the east it's just a blur. Most of the city (with a population over 200,000) is to the east but you can't even identify large buildings at the resolution provided.

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For anyone who wants to find caches near an area w/ google maps but need coords:

right click on any spot on the map and select "directions from here"

in the bar on the left it has the coordinates for that point on the map

 

Note, that if you want the coordinates of a spot on the map, you have to click somewhere away from a road. If you right click near a road, it will provide driving directions to a point on the road "close" to where you've selected, but it won't tell you what the coordinates are. If you click on a spot even a small distance away from a road it'll say something like: "We could not calculate directions between 42.422416,-76.488858 and Ithaca, NY." You'd then have to convert those coordinates to degrees, decimal minutes to use the Hide & Seek a Cache form.

 

It's also worth noting that the resolution of the maps in different places varies significantly. Trying entering a hotel name that I stayed at a couple of months ago (Morogoro Hotel, Morogoro, Tanzania) into Google Maps. The available resolution changes right in the middle of the road where the hotel is located. To the west it would be usable for identifying some fairly small features (for example, a baobab tree that is just outside the lobby of the hotel) but to the east it's just a blur. Most of the city (with a population over 200,000) is to the east but you can't even identify large buildings at the resolution provided.

I tried to find the coordinates of a micro on a guardrail because I stumbled upon it by chance and needed to find the name. I tried rightclick "directions from here", but it gave me the name of the road and not the coordinates.

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I tried to find the coordinates of a micro on a guardrail because I stumbled upon it by chance and needed to find the name. I tried rightclick "directions from here", but it gave me the name of the road and not the coordinates.

see post #51.

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note to mods, before you ban me again, understand i did not mention anything unholy, im just tired of people who do not have a smartphone or have never used one, complain about the ability of it to perform as well as if not sometimes better than their expensive dated gps units.

 

 

as with everything.... not everyone has the same experience. i have a buddy who has only a smart phone to geocache with. it usually gets him within 50 feet of a cache... and then it is up to his wits. if it is a lamppost cache... or a cache in a tree (and it is the only tree around) he's golden.... otherwise he runs into problems.

 

me on the other hand... i have a low end model garmin that was $100 - still don't see the use in paying 300 for a smart phone and then paying 50+ a month for service that may or may not be there. i mostly don't have problems zeroing in... tree/cloudcover, bad cell reception and all. the ones that give me problems.... the people who place caches using iPhone... that appears to be hit or miss - 2 feet all the way out to 300+ feet off.

 

As someone who uses both I can say without a doubt it depends on your smartphone. If you use an Iphone it sucks and can be up to 100 feet off. Androids on the other hand get you within 8 feet in the woods with tree AND cloud cover.

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Note, that if you want the coordinates of a spot on the map, you have to click somewhere away from a road. If you right click near a road, it will provide driving directions to a point on the road "close" to where you've selected, but it won't tell you what the coordinates are. If you click on a spot even a small distance away from a road it'll say something like: "We could not calculate directions between 42.422416,-76.488858 and Ithaca, NY." You'd then have to convert those coordinates to degrees, decimal minutes to use the Hide & Seek a Cache form.

 

It's also worth noting that the resolution of the maps in different places varies significantly. Trying entering a hotel name that I stayed at a couple of months ago (Morogoro Hotel, Morogoro, Tanzania) into Google Maps. The available resolution changes right in the middle of the road where the hotel is located. To the west it would be usable for identifying some fairly small features (for example, a baobab tree that is just outside the lobby of the hotel) but to the east it's just a blur. Most of the city (with a population over 200,000) is to the east but you can't even identify large buildings at the resolution provided.

 

Couple things here....

 

Regarding establishing coordinates near a road.. yes the red pin will often go to a road if it is close by.. I assume it is tied to a mailing address or local tax map location, but you should also have a green arrow that is on the coordinates you requested. I go directly to the main Google search page, not through the Geocaching.com links, when I'm looking for a map of a specific set of coordinates not associated with an existing cache. Just type in the coordinates like [40 23.635 -75 21.279] and specify "map" on the menu in the upper left. You can zoom in and fine tune by adjusting the numbers to a specific tree if you need to.

 

Yes satellite image quality is not equal in all parts of the world. One common problem is poor registration between the aerial view and the standard road map. I've personally found the aerial image to be better aligned with reality and usually turn the labeling layer off. One thing is that if the layers are misaligned in an area it is usually consistent so once I establish a fudge factor it is useful for finding a bunch of caches.

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eh, the old schoolers are just sore that they spent a bunch of money on a fancy gps unit, a printer, ink, and paper to find their nearest caches

 

Quoted for truth.

 

Really? I use both. I use my iPhone about 90% of the time and prefer it but I spent and continue to spend way more for the iPhone than I did for my one time purchase of my $100 Legend.

As for paper and ink (Who doesn't already own a printer?),That used to run me about ummm...maybe $50 a year.

Besides... money has nothing to do with it for most people.

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eh, the old schoolers are just sore that they spent a bunch of money on a fancy gps unit, a printer, ink, and paper to find their nearest caches

 

Quoted for truth.

 

Really? I use both. I use my iPhone about 90% of the time and prefer it but I spent and continue to spend way more for the iPhone than I did for my one time purchase of my $100 Legend.

As for paper and ink (Who doesn't already own a printer?),That used to run me about ummm...maybe $50 a year.

Besides... money has nothing to do with it for most people.

 

I know, right? Our GPSr cost under $100... and we cache paperlessly, so no ink, no paper. We do have a printer at home, which we spent $30. Still WAAAAYYYY less than a smartphone. We make a comfortable living too, and we think that smartphones are too expensive for us to bother with.

 

I think it's fabulous that people like their smartphones so much, but don't try to tell us that it's cheaper than a GPSr. :) Definitely not often the case.

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To answer the OP's question, yes I have used google maps to find caches quicker. I sorta felt like I was cheating myself though, so I don't do it anymore.

 

I just recently got an iPhone. I've cached a few times with it. It's great to have so many options for finding caches. I wonder how many caches are hidden with google that nobody will admit to?

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To answer the OP's question, yes I have used google maps to find caches quicker. I sorta felt like I was cheating myself though, so I don't do it anymore.

 

I just recently got an iPhone. I've cached a few times with it. It's great to have so many options for finding caches. I wonder how many caches are hidden with google that nobody will admit to?

 

There was one placed near me last night that must have been hidden using google earth or something other than a GPSr.

I say this because it is placed in a tiny park (nice place) that is in between two skyscrapers.

My GPSr was bouncing all over the place and my iPhone showed me about 6 blocks away.

I looked for it and will look for it tomorrow as it hasn't been found yet.

 

I WILL find it first!

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