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Geocaching 101


CapeDoc
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I was thinking it would be a nice idea to do a cache called Geocaching 101, where the listing contains hints and tips from experienced caches.

 

Any ideas?

 

All tips will be added to the listing and credited to the person who gives the tip.

Tips can be for hiding or finding caches.

 

New cachers reading the thread my also find it interesting!

:)

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Safety First - as always.

 

Do not get yourself into tricky situations - either natural - such as flood waters or cliffs (can easily happen following the GPSr) - and remember you are distracted often using one hand and constantly looking at the GPSr. AND manmade dangers. Walking around parks and other remote arteas with a GPSr in your hands - you can be an easy target for muggers!

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Use a stick in a hole... before sticking your hands in.

 

Wear gloves when searching holes.

 

Pick up caches slowly, you never know what may lurk underneath them.

 

Way mark your car or the start point on a hike so that you do not get lost on your way back. Use the track feature on the GPS to backtrack to the start.

 

Take pictures...

 

Carry a pen, a spare log sheet and a zip lock bag.

 

Keep a note book and make a note of your finds.

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When hiding a cache, take multiple readings (6 - 10 is good), moving several meters away each time and approaching from as many different directions as you can, allowing the GPS to 'settle' each time. Then average them to get the coordinates to use on the cache page.

Edited by MnCo
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Wow!

Thanks for the great responses!

 

Wazat:

Sounds like you may have been stung/ bitten before! Good pointers! Like the spare log sheet, ziploc.

 

MnCo:

Ohh, so that's why your coords are so accurate! (LOL I average too - only found the "averaging" function on my Oregon the other day. Does it all automatically for you).

 

Geo936

I often cache with my iPhone, and if I forget to switch it on before reaching the cache area it can take a very frustrating age to get a fix. Nice tip.

 

CH

Read this log. Great tip, append "READ THE LISTING FOR SAFETY'S SAKE!

 

DC

One of the first lessons to learn. Get to GZ. Put the GPS away and think "where would I put it". Good one!

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Ohh, so that's why your coords are so accurate!

 

I do my best ;):anicute:

 

(LOL I average too - only found the "averaging" function on my Oregon the other day. Does it all automatically for you).

 

Even with an averaging GPS, I think taking multiple readings and comparing them (and if necessary averaging those) is a good idea... or is that just overkill :P

 

For those of us not quite so blessed with such nifty technology, here is a little stand alone program I've been using to average out my coordinates.

Edited by MnCo
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Carry a few cache maintenance items in your bag. Nothing like being a cache owner and getting a note from a proactive cacher to say - "Replaced the logsheet" - or container lid was cracked - we replaced with a watertight one.

 

Always trade even or up - don't grab four or five cool items and leave nothing.

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Carry a few cache maintenance items in your bag. Nothing like being a cache owner and getting a note from a proactive cacher to say - "Replaced the logsheet" - or container lid was cracked - we replaced with a watertight one.

 

I recently came across a cache with a cracked lid, and thought "if only I had some duct tape" - a little strip stuck over the crack or stuck on the inside (if it is a cammo painted container) might not be a permanent solution, but a good temporary one. Something like Presstick can also be useful to temporarily cover small holes in containers or a blob of it placed on the end of a stick might help retrieve items dropped into hard to reach places.

Edited by malo mystery
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Our best kept secret is the small maglite torch that always accompanies us when we go out caching - it never lets us down!

 

Other friends walk around with a pair of braai tongs for retrieving caches from under rocks and in dark crevices, but we've never tried that method!

 

Small packets of Wet Ones are a great asset, too.

 

I have a fancy little gadget which most mechanics will have in their toolboxes. It is essentially a long telescopic "shaft" with a screw attachment at the end that can take a mirror with an adjustable neck to look around corners, etc or a very powerful little magnet that can be used for lifting a magnetic object out of a hidey hole. Very handy to have around but have been in a few situations where I wished that I had brought the darned thing with me! I do not like to put my hands into places that I cannot see what is inside as they are generally not teeth proof!

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In our geocahing bag, we always have a toilet roll, and a small towel.

It also contains a pocket knife, as well as some log sheets, and jiffy bags as others have stated also the bigger trading items.

 

In my camera bag, I have a compass, small torch, a flexible measuring tape, and medical kit.

The bag also contains a small lock and lock container with additional tissues, cable ties, magnets, glue, and log sheets.

I can either take my medical kit, or my video camera. Most cases it is the medical kit.

 

In the medical kit, we have the normal stuff like plasters, headache tables, etc etc.

Something we have added is some cream for insect bites.

Due to an altercation we almost had with a snake (see log) I bought a snake venum kit at outdoor warehouse. This kit supposedly buys you and extra hour to get to the hospital.

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Read the cache description CAREFULLY and right to the end before even starting to look for the cache, especially if it's a multi or a mystery cache. Get an idea of what you will need to do and have with you before you start. It's very frustrating to get to the second last stage of a multi and then discovering that you should have taken a photo of something along the way to solve for the final co-ordinates.

 

Once you've found the cache, take time to write a decent log and try to avoid putting in spoilers. Most cache owners would prefer a longer, descriptive log (even if negative) to just logging TFTC or "easy find". Think of it as a way of saying thank-you to the person who placed the cache.

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Read the cache description CAREFULLY and right to the end before even starting to look for the cache, especially if it's a multi or a mystery cache. Get an idea of what you will need to do and have with you before you start. It's very frustrating to get to the second last stage of a multi and then discovering that you should have taken a photo of something along the way to solve for the final co-ordinates.

 

 

He he - good one! I have suffered from this (on a g8scot cache) and side-kick Pete now will not move until the story is fully read.

 

Taking a spare lot of batteries (for the camera as well) is also not a bad idea - not pleasant to get within 100m of GZ and the GPS dies!

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Great idea Doc.

 

I would second the suggestion that it get pinned. Most of this information is available on the forum if you have weeks to read through everything. I cheated when I started by starting a new topic but this tought me an great deal. I think if this topic is pinned and is easy to find, newbies will enjoy the sport a lot more.

 

I would list the items below as the most important:

1) Read the log carefully and ensure that you are equiped for what may be required. (Long walk, take water and ensure that enough daylight hours are left to complete the task before setting off. LOG)

When your gps has taken you to Ground Zero, put it away, take your time and study the area. You will normally find something that draws your attention. This could be a nice hice hiding place (which you would have chosen) or something that does not belong. Chances are that this is where the cache is.

Take the time to write a log.

Take the time to enjoy the areas that Geocaching take you to. I have encountered amazing places through this sport and that is what drives me to continue.

TCNZ's

Edited by The Could Not Zee's
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Do HOME-work...

 

Read Logs and check photos....

 

A lot of cachers give subtle hints or clues hidden in their logs... Try and read between the lines... It gets easier the more you do it... Make notes... It helps...

 

Photos can be a dead give away... Look at the background, the trees, the rocks or anything that will help you recognize something when you get to GZ... Lots of times you'll see the cache container in the photo, which will help you in figuring out where something of that shape and size could be hidden...

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Always trade even or up - don't grab four or five cool items and leave nothing.

Here is my take on trading up:

Rather take out two (or more) not so great objects and put it one great item. This way the stuff in the cache will get better and better. If you trade multiple objects for one great item, the value gets "watered down" (even if the overall value of the swag has increased) and the next person to find the cache will have nothing great to find.

"Trade up and don't dilute".

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Rolf says: Switch on your GPSr at least 15 mins prior to looking for the cache. It just makes a difference with the accuracy.

True, it does improve accuracy.

Tip: But if you didn't switch it on early, do the double-on routine:

Switch on, wait for it to aquire the satelites, then switch off.

Switch on again.

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Always trade even or up - don't grab four or five cool items and leave nothing.

Here is my take on trading up:

Rather take out two (or more) not so great objects and put it one great item. This way the stuff in the cache will get better and better. If you trade multiple objects for one great item, the value gets "watered down" (even if the overall value of the swag has increased) and the next person to find the cache will have nothing great to find.

"Trade up and don't dilute".

 

I agree with the "trade up and not dilute" - too often you see something like "took out flash drive, and put in 3 Macdonalds toys, a few golf teas and a plastic cow". I guess this is a case of preparing properly before caching by having a range of different valued items in your bag, including some of higher value.

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Do HOME-work...

 

Read Logs and check photos....

 

A lot of cachers give subtle hints or clues hidden in their logs... Try and read between the lines... It gets easier the more you do it... Make notes... It helps...

 

 

Yes - but UNDERSTAND what you read. I just was passing the Castle and popped in to do The Tower. Found my date but because I had read the last couple of logs referring to firing of cannons at noon I assumed the worked out coordinates would take me to the Noon Day Gun as people mentioned getting a fright when the guns went off. Since I did not have time for that I thought I would work out the coords later and go to the Noon Gun site.

 

Well silly me because obviously the final is right there! I thought it a bit strange that the final would be so far away at the Noon Day Gun!!!!!

 

Now I have to pay another R25 rand to get in an find the cache!!! But I only briefly breezed arround so I will take a more leisurely visit next time and get my monies worth!

 

So moral of the story - COMPREHENSION COMPREHENSION COMPREHENSION - and trust yourself when you think something is a bit funny!

 

Trev

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I added to the caching bag from the Dollar Store one of those scissor type kitchen tongs and remodeled the ends a little. From our Ace Hardware I ran across a telescoping tool on the bargain table with a rare earth magnet that is supposed to lift eight lbs. It closes down to 6 1/2" and telescopes to about 33 1/2" I also carry a small flashlight with the 3 watt led for looking in dark places.

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Thanks all for your contributions!!!!

Below is a summary:

 

Below are a few tips and hints from some seasoned cachers regarding both finding and hiding a cache:

 

FINDING A CACHE:

 

* Trust your GPSr.... but not to much. DamhuisClan

 

* Switch on your GPSr at least 15 mins prior to looking for the cache. It just makes a difference with the accuracy. GEO936

 

* Our best kept secret is the small maglite torch that always accompanies us when we go out caching - it never lets us down! Tricky Vicky & Mickey

 

* Remember to look up! CapeDoc

 

* Safety First - as always:

Do not get yourself into tricky situations - either natural - such as flood waters or cliffs (can easily happen following the GPSr) - and remember you are distracted often using one hand and constantly looking at the GPSr. AND manmade dangers. Walking around parks and other remote areas with a GPSr in your hands - you can be an easy target for muggers! Carbon Hunter

 

* Read the cache description CAREFULLY and right to the end before even starting to look for the cache, especially if it's a multi or a mystery cache. Get an idea of what you will need to do and have with you before you start. Gr8scot

 

* Not always, but in many cases you need to look for something that is "out of place". That is often where you'll find the cache! GEO936

 

* A lot of cachers give subtle hints or clues hidden in their logs... Try and read between the lines... It gets easier the more you do it... Make notes... It helps...

o Photos can be a dead give away... Look at the background, the trees, the rocks or anything that will help you recognize something when you get to GZ... Lots of times you'll see the cache container in the photo, which will help you in figuring out where something of that shape and size could be hidden... Henzz

 

HIDING A CACHE:

 

* My suggestion for placing a cache in the wild - make sure no fynbos needs to get trampled to get to the cache - soon a path is formed and that is what we want to avoid! Tomtwogates

 

* Create interesting listings easily by using Firefox as your browser, install the "Greasemonkey" script, then download and install "Write Area". Once installed right click in the "long description" box of the "Create/Edit Listing" page. Click on "Edit in a write area" and a box will open that will convert everything you do automatically to HTML when you click "Save". Remember to tick the "descriptions are in HTML" box! CapeDoc

 

* If you do place one on top of a mountain or on a long hike - make sure your hints are sufficient for the cacher to find it - nothing more frustrating than hiking for a day and coming up empty handed! Tomtwogates

 

* When hiding a cache, take multiple readings (6 - 10 is good), moving several meters away each time and approaching from as many different directions as you can, allowing the GPS to 'settle' each time. Then average them to get the coordinates to use on the cache page. MnCo

 

OTHER TIPS:

 

* Once you've found the cache, take time to write a decent log and try to avoid putting in spoilers. Most cache owners would prefer a longer, descriptive log (even if negative) to just logging TFTC or "easy find". Think of it as a way of saying thank-you to the person who placed the cache. Gr8scot

 

*

o Use a stick in a hole... before sticking your hands in.

o Wear gloves when searching holes.

o Pick up caches slowly, you never know what may lurk underneath them.

o Way mark your car or the start point on a hike so that you do not get lost on your way back. Use the track feature on the GPS to backtrack to the start.

o Take pictures...

o Carry a pen, a spare log sheet and a zip lock bag.

o Keep a note book and make a note of your finds. Wazat

 

* Carry a few cache maintenance items in your bag. Carbon Hunter

 

* Suggestions of things to carry in you caching bag:

o water

o toilet roll

o small towel

o pocket knife/multitool

o compass

o flexible measuring tape

o medical kit

o additional tissues

o cable ties

o spare batteries

o wire coathanger Many contributers

 

* Take the time to enjoy the areas that Geocaching take you to. I have encountered amazing places through this sport and that is what drives me to continue. The Could Not Zees

 

* Rather take out two (or more) not so great objects and put it one great item. This way the stuff in the cache will get better and better. If you trade multiple objects for one great item, the value gets "watered down" (even if the overall value of the swag has increased) and the next person to find the cache will have nothing great to find.

"Trade up and don't dilute" CapeDoc

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Jannie comes lately… just to take Henzz’s reference to cache size further: Size does matter… the published cache size is one of the most important pieces of info in the cache description. It usually gives you a clear indication of where to search and/or what to look for.

E.g. I think 99.9% of all regular caches are hidden “under rocks”, have never seen a nano that’s not magnetic and micros can only fit in so many places (around GZ) – except of cause if they are hanging in Karoo-bossies… :)

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........ have never seen a nano that’s not magnetic ...... :D

 

Don't count on it... I have a none magnetic nano just waiting for the right hiding spot to present itself.... :anibad:

 

;) I have a couple that are placed on aluminium which happens to be non-magnetic! :laughing: I have also found a couple, in Australia, that were not magnetic either - read plastic! :anicute:

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When searching under poor accuracy conditions (like under trees) try the following:

 

1. approach the GZ from three or more different directions and some way back and try and locate the GZ visually from quite a distance away. Even with poor GPS accuracy you will narrow down your search area.

 

2. remember that the accuracy of the owners co-ordinates would also have been out and you could be way off the mark. Read the hint, stop, look around and think.

 

3. start looking for things that are slightly out of place from some way away... like unnatural small rock piles blocking a hole under a larger rock :)

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After our Techno Event 2 this weekend, we had a session on the tips and tricks for hiding caches. I learned a very valuable piece of information! There is a document that Fish Eagle and GlobalRat put together which is available on a link under Fish Eagle's profile. It is a huge document, but there is a lot of detail, pictures, etc. all to do with successfully and correctly hiding a cache. Plus it goes into the various cache types. I feel it is an essential tool for geocachers in RSA to look at BEFORE they go hiding caches. Even as a non-newbie, I learnt a few tricks and things to be aware of. The good thing about it is that it has been researched for the South African geocaching setup, whereas the hints and tips on GC.com are predominantly for overseas. :)

Edited by GEO936
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After our Techno Event 2 this weekend, we had a session on the tips and tricks for hiding caches. I learned a very valuable piece of information! There is a document that Fish Eagle and GlobalRat put together which is available on a link under Fish Eagle's profile. It is a huge document, but there is a lot of detail, pictures, etc. all to do with successfully and correctly hiding a cache. Plus it goes into the various cache types. I feel it is an essential tool for geocachers in RSA to look at BEFORE they go hiding caches. Even as a non-newbie, I learnt a few tricks and things to be aware of. The good thing about it is that it has been researched for the South African geocaching setup, whereas the hints and tips on GC.com are predominantly for overseas. :)

 

Thanks! Yes it is a fantastic resource! The link to the page can be found here..

 

(To find the new cache that a few of us are putting together,"Geocaching 101" I am going to get cachers to read through the info to gather clues to the first waypoint)

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After our Techno Event 2 this weekend, we had a session on the tips and tricks for hiding caches. I learned a very valuable piece of information! There is a document that Fish Eagle and GlobalRat put together which is available on a link under Fish Eagle's profile. It is a huge document, but there is a lot of detail, pictures, etc. all to do with successfully and correctly hiding a cache. Plus it goes into the various cache types. I feel it is an essential tool for geocachers in RSA to look at BEFORE they go hiding caches. Even as a non-newbie, I learnt a few tricks and things to be aware of. The good thing about it is that it has been researched for the South African geocaching setup, whereas the hints and tips on GC.com are predominantly for overseas. :)

 

Thanks! Yes it is a fantastic resource! The link to the page can be found here..

 

(To find the new cache that a few of us are putting together,"Geocaching 101" I am going to get cachers to read through the info to gather clues to the first waypoint)

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Caches with a very personal theme are probably not a great idea

 

Yes and No. WIth careful thought and due care a cache can be intensely personal to the placer but not feel like it to the finders. Although I do not have many caches (yet) they all have some personal meaning to me although that does not come across very obviously I think.!!!1

 

The one I hid with AfricanAlien (AfricanAliens Amanzi Paradise) actually I woudl consider very personal. That was a spot close to our home where we grew up and where my Dad and AfricanAlien still live. I have very fond memories of the river there. That cache highlights this and has had many great found logs - many people clearly appreciating the spot as I do now and di back then - can;t get more personal than that.

 

I think there is a lot in the name and A Tribute of Friends and Family (did not do this one Justice I think) - the hider explains a single incident of having visited the spot with family and friends (one someone else’s advice) - hence the name. Now that is a brilliant cache - location, and execution are fabulous so don;t let the name fool you which to me is a bit too personal a name - I love the idea but the name to me is a bit corny. (unless I am underestimating the significance of this post to the cache hider.)

 

I've done Nanas Cache - a deeply personal cache commerating the placers grandmother and if I remember correctly it even had a picture of the great lady. The location offered great views of Somerset West. Another good personal cache.

 

One I have not done is A vikings last journey (or something similar) if I remember correctly recalling the passing of a loved one and the scattering of his ashes in the sea - a spot that can be viewed from the vantage point of the caches location

 

I have done various tributes to dogs including a multi that took you to the house where the dog use to live to find a clue and then going to the mountain to a nice look out spot.

 

All deeply personal caches but mostly well done.

 

I think the trick is not to be overly sentimental and make sure the location is s good one and of interest to others.

 

Probably not a good idea as a first hide........

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I agree that the caches you mention have their merit, but do you feel that it is the location and hide that makes them good, or their personal nature? I do feel a little put off when commemorating someone elses significant event.

I have a cache commemorating my second daughters birth and am seriously thinking of changing it's name (despite some great logs). The location speaks for itself, it's a good one, the cache is not improved by the personal significance it has to me. As you say, the name doesn't do the cache justice...and can make cachers feel a little uneasy. :lol:

Edited by CapeDoc
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I think there is a lot in the name and A Tribute of Friends and Family (did not do this one Justice I think) - the hider explains a single incident of having visited the spot with family and friends (one someone else’s advice) - hence the name. Now that is a brilliant cache - location, and execution are fabulous so don;t let the name fool you which to me is a bit too personal a name - I love the idea but the name to me is a bit corny. (unless I am underestimating the significance of this post to the cache hider.)

 

Perhaps I need fill in a bit more detail on the caches page around the reasons for the name. The event mentioned was quite an event, a birthday, a meeting of friends from around the world, an announcement of an engagement. Also the cache was put together in a friends garage, another helped place it (if you have done it you know the work involved) Possum even ended up on crutches for 6 weeks as a result of placing the cache. So the name was changed from a Generic "River Side Stroll" to somthing that had more meaning, corny as that may be :lol: .

Edited by Pixel and Possum
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Trevor7000 and Capedoc's replies refer. I quite like the addition of a personal element - especially (particularly) if it is a worthwhile cache in it's own right anyway (view, hide, puzzle, etc) . That is what makes us human. There would be the potential of it being a bit much if that was the only sort of cache about, but at this stage it is hardly as if it is becoming a trend. The caches mentioned: Simone's Surprise, Trevs home turf cache, Jessica, Nana's Cache are all great caches in their own right - the fact that they mean something special to the owner just adds to the specialness.

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Pixel and Possum

 

I did not mean to slate the cache name - it is truly a great cache in a great location. I guess I understand better the chosen name. That cache will always be remembered by me as it is a eally special place - and as you know a great place to entertain friends and family.

 

I discovered that place a while back through my work with The Friends of the Liesbeek. I thought it was a hidden gem that needed to be shared with the world and I scoped hiding places and took plenty of GPS readings. I did not get to place a cache before I discovered the final of NABM right there. I had no knowledge of Vespax's cache either as I believe it was archived before I started caching.

 

The name even though I understand it better still does not do it for me - but the cache and the location does. I look forward to some more caches from you guys.......

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Pixel and Possum

 

I did not mean to slate the cache name - it is truly a great cache in a great location. I guess I understand better the chosen name. That cache will always be remembered by me as it is a eally special place - and as you know a great place to entertain friends and family.

 

I discovered that place a while back through my work with The Friends of the Liesbeek. I thought it was a hidden gem that needed to be shared with the world and I scoped hiding places and took plenty of GPS readings. I did not get to place a cache before I discovered the final of NABM right there. I had no knowledge of Vespax's cache either as I believe it was archived before I started caching.

 

The name even though I understand it better still does not do it for me - but the cache and the location does. I look forward to some more caches from you guys.......

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Pixel and Possum

 

I did not mean to slate the cache name - it is truly a great cache in a great location. I guess I understand better the chosen name. That cache will always be remembered by me as it is a eally special place - and as you know a great place to entertain friends and family.

 

I discovered that place a while back through my work with The Friends of the Liesbeek. I thought it was a hidden gem that needed to be shared with the world and I scoped hiding places and took plenty of GPS readings. I did not get to place a cache before I discovered the final of NABM right there. I had no knowledge of Vespax's cache either as I believe it was archived before I started caching.

 

The name even though I understand it better still does not do it for me - but the cache and the location does. I look forward to some more caches from you guys.......

 

No worries, I didnt take it as a slate and thanks for the compliment on the cache. Our caches are very slow in the making but dont worry there will be more. :P

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"I've done Nanas Cache - a deeply personal cache commerating the placers grandmother and if I remember correctly it even had a picture of the great lady. The location offered great views of Somerset West. Another good personal cache."

 

Thanks very much I'm glad that my cache is a great one and ill make sure i keep it going just a little correction being she was my mother and a wonderful grandmother! I hope i didn't offend you for the correction but i just thought i would do her some gratification!

I know personal caches aren't always great to do but it does help to know place one as a remembrance to some people and a way of healing for others!

So thanks to all who have done it and i hope there will be plenty more!

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Pixel (& Possum) drew my attention to the first log on sy-chispa's Camps Bay Historical Walk this morning. To me this is a classic case of a newbie not knowing the accepted protocol for logging a find.

 

Sy-chispa obviously put a lot of time and research into setting up this cache. To get a first log like that must be pretty disappointing to say the least! Obviously the logger just doesn't know any better and the only way to improve this is by education.

 

I've always tried to send a "Welcome to Geocaching" e-mail when I've seen a log posted on one of my caches by someone with a very low find count. Just to say hello and to offer assistance if they need any in the future. From now on I'm also going to add a link to post #27 above (CapeDoc's summary). This should hopefully assist in the education of new cachers and at the same time make them aware of the forum.

 

I just hope this doesn't come over as too patronising. Any thoughts?

Edited by Gr8Scot
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If you look at their other logs you will see that they have actually been caching in the company of sy-chispa - so that maybe the reason for the brief log it may even be the person mentioned in the intro.

 

"Thanks to a friend, who has recently established an Historical Walking Trail through Camps Bay (see http://www.campsbaycommunity.com) we have been able to pick her brain and to set up this multi-cache. We hope you find it as interesting as we did."

 

Never the less a pointer to the Doc's post could be useful.

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If you look at their other logs you will see that they have actually been caching in the company of sy-chispa - so that maybe the reason for the brief log it may even be the person mentioned in the intro.

 

I suspect you are correct. In which case I can understand the need for less of a praising log, but poor form to log what could clearly be seen as a FTF, if they helped create the cache :P

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