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Android phones and applications


sagefemme
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According to Jeremy Irish, an Android Geocaching app is in the works but it will be some time before it is available. Until then, you are stuck with third party apps for th Android OS.

 

Can someone talk to me about these third party apps? I just bought a Blackberry w/ ATT voice and data, because the salesman told me that's what would work best for my purposes (and I believed him). I know I can download maps and apps, so how to make geocaching while travelling easier?!

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While waiting for the official version, can I suggest (REMOVED] as a worthwhile download? Its in the Market.

 

Moderator note: no, you may not. The application you mentioned violates Groundspeak's Terms of Use Agreement and uses elements of Groundspeak's Trademark Geocaching logo and cache icons without permission. Do not discuss it in the Groundspeak forums. In addition, this section of the forums is set aside for discussions of official Groundspeak mobile applications.

Edited by Keystone
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I have read this entire thread and I haven't seen a definitive answer to our questions, so please forgive me if I missed something. If I did, it's because I'm not too familiar with this technology.

 

My hubby and I currently do not have SmartPhones, and really don't need much more from a phone. HOWEVER, having said that, we do see the wonderful advantages of being able to use a cell phone for geocaching. At this time we are with (may I say this?) Verizon, so we can't get an iPhone. But we are both eligible for upgrades with pretty good discounts and there is a special we could get right now that would be a two-for-one Droid.

 

We have looked at the Droid, and it is really, really amazing, but certainly does a lot more than we need. BUT, if we were to get a Droid, is there truly an app out there for use on it that would do all of the things that the app for the iPhone does? From what I have read, there isn't, and this is what everyone is waiting for, to be released. Am I correct?

 

In the meantime though, could we use our Droid exclusively for caching and no longer need our Garmin Summit HC? Or would we need both to do everything? The idea of being able to find a nearby cache to go for, on the spur of the moment while out on an errand, would be really cool, but would we be able to see a google satellite map as well as the logs for the cache? Also, it would be nice to be able to log the find right there on the spot. We bumped into a cacher once who was using a Blackberry, but was he probably just going to Geocaching.com on his phone? I don't know if their browser is that powerful, but I think the Droid would be. We see these cachers finding 50, 70, 100 caches in one day! That seems impossible if burdened by printing out and downloading each cache ahead of time. Is this how they are doing that?

 

As you can see, we have a lot of questions, but I guess to summarize, is there a good app for a Droid available now that is really good if we upgraded to this 3G phone? We haven't done a lot of caching, but are finally getting to a point where we will have a lot more time to devote to this sport, and we really love it! So, THANK YOU to any responses who could clear some of this up for us! ;)

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My wife and I are considering upgrading to a Droid but Verizon wants $29.00 per line added on to our bill for the data plan. I don't feel like paying $60.00 a month extra for something I could do with my gps anyway. We take our gps everywhere and if we need to do paperless caching I could always load up caches on my cell phone from the website and input the data right into my gps. Unless the data plan price is reduced we may have to sit on the sideline for a Droid.

 

I have talked to people that cache with their phone and even went out on a cache run with someone carrying an Iphone. The Iphone always had that person 40-50 feet off from GZ. That is not very reliable. If you are to look at a Droid phone I would suggest the ERIS by HTC. The DROID by Motorola is nice but I like a virtual keyboad for txt messages. The other thing I read up on was the batter life is not great on those phone either. See the reviews on Verizon.

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My wife and I are considering upgrading to a Droid but Verizon wants $29.00 per line added on to our bill for the data plan. I don't feel like paying $60.00 a month extra for something I could do with my gps anyway. We take our gps everywhere and if we need to do paperless caching I could always load up caches on my cell phone from the website and input the data right into my gps. Unless the data plan price is reduced we may have to sit on the sideline for a Droid.

 

I have talked to people that cache with their phone and even went out on a cache run with someone carrying an Iphone. The Iphone always had that person 40-50 feet off from GZ. That is not very reliable. If you are to look at a Droid phone I would suggest the ERIS by HTC. The DROID by Motorola is nice but I like a virtual keyboad for txt messages. The other thing I read up on was the batter life is not great on those phone either. See the reviews on Verizon.

 

The one thing you mentioned that kinda makes or breaks not upgrading our phone is that you said that you "can always load up caches on my cell phone from the website and input the data right into my GPS." Admittedly, the owner's manual that came with our Garmin Summit HC is worthless, but I have not found any way to load the info on the cache page to our GPS. I think you must have a higher-end GPS. Also, our current phones have virtually no browser capabilites. We do not have PDAs. If you know of a way to load the cache page info into the GPS that I don't know about, that would be great. I think I'm hijacking this forum, and better move to a tech forum about GPSs. Sorry! :laughing:

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OK

I'm not sure about android Phones here in the UK

I use a Nokia N97 this AFAIK is NOT Android but whatever S60 is

compared to the Iphone

 

would appreciate info as to what App/widget I can downlaod to geocache

The N97 runs Symbian OS. I don't think there's a centralized app store for Symbian like there is for Android and iPhone OS.

 

A Google search for "Symbian geocaching" turned up a few results for me, but I have no idea if any of them are any good.

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I've been following this forum thread for awhile now, waiting for the Android release. Until now I've been quiet and have not said a word, but I see many people asking to beta this app. I don't know if any of them actually have been able to but, if I can help, I certainly will.

 

I am an experienced geocacher, that has purchased this app for mine and my wifes Iphone (3G and 3GS) and loved it. In November I gave my wife my 3GS and jumped to Verizon and a Droid. I absolutely love the Droid and it's awesome GPS! The Droids GPS is far more accurate than Iphone and is even better than my Garmin GPS60. The reason is it uses both aGPS and sGPS. The iPhone only has aGPS.

 

I am the technology director in a school system where we are starting a geocaching club. I have experience in technical writing, troubleshooting, testing and since I have used the iPhone app I could do a fair comparison on the android port if you would like any more beta help. If not, I look forward to purchasing this as soon as it's available. Just an FYI for anyone reading this,[reference to unauthorized application removed by moderator]

 

Thanks,

 

GeoTracker1966

Edited by Keystone
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...The reason is it uses both aGPS and sGPS. The iPhone only has aGPS.

...

 

This is positively wrong, the chipset in the iPhone 3G/3GS is the Infineon PMB2525 Hammerhead II which uses both sGPS and aGPS.

 

However I heard that Google Maps (the one opened through Safari, not the iPhone Maps Apps) can only make use of aGPS, what's your comment?

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However I heard that Google Maps (the one opened through Safari, not the iPhone Maps Apps) can only make use of aGPS, what's your comment?

I cannot comment what you have heard, but I can tell for sure that my iPhone has been used with no cellphone signal at all, but with the gps still working on downloaded maps. It is very easy for me to reach an area with no cell cover, it is lots of them in the area where I live.

Google Maps rely on online maps, and you need to have cell or wlan cover to use them.

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...The reason is it uses both aGPS and sGPS. The iPhone only has aGPS.

...

 

This is positively wrong, the chipset in the iPhone 3G/3GS is the Infineon PMB2525 Hammerhead II which uses both sGPS and aGPS.

 

Is that right? Then explain these specifications that are right here on Apples page.. http://www.apple.com/iphone/specs.html

 

Assisted GPS only..... not both!

 

Positively right!

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Is that right? Then explain these specifications that are right here on Apples page.. http://www.apple.com/iphone/specs.html

 

Assisted GPS only..... not both!

 

Positively right!

I see that, but then explain how the phone's gps works when there is no cell coverage. And why is there a separate gps antenna inside the phone if there is a-gps only? And what do Apple mean by specifying WLAN and Cellular in addition to A-GPS as location techniques?

From the Hammerhead II Specs:

Hammerhead II integrates a high performance A-GPS baseband processor and a low-noise GPS RF front end.
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Is that right? Then explain these specifications that are right here on Apples page.. http://www.apple.com/iphone/specs.html

 

Assisted GPS only..... not both!

 

Positively right!

I see that, but then explain how the phone's gps works when there is no cell coverage. And why is there a separate gps antenna inside the phone if there is a-gps only? And what do Apple mean by specifying WLAN and Cellular in addition to A-GPS as location techniques?

From the Hammerhead II Specs:

Hammerhead II integrates a high performance A-GPS baseband processor and a low-noise GPS RF front end.

 

The iPhone 3G/3GS have assisted GPS (A-GPS) using the Infineon PMB 2525 (Hammerhead II) chipset. A-GPS means that there are many ways to obtain your location besides reading the multiple GPS geosynchronous satellites signals broadcasted in 1.57542 GHz. When you turn ON the option Settings -> General -> "Location Services", there are three major ways the iPhone gets your location: Satellite GPS, Cell Tower Triangulation, and WPS.

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Is that right? Then explain these specifications that are right here on Apples page.. http://www.apple.com/iphone/specs.html

 

Assisted GPS only..... not both!

 

Positively right!

I see that, but then explain how the phone's gps works when there is no cell coverage. And why is there a separate gps antenna inside the phone if there is a-gps only? And what do Apple mean by specifying WLAN and Cellular in addition to A-GPS as location techniques?

From the Hammerhead II Specs:

Hammerhead II integrates a high performance A-GPS baseband processor and a low-noise GPS RF front end.

 

What Apple means by WLAN and Cellular is that it can find location by cellular service, by wireless lan or by a combination of them, this IS assisted GPS. sGPS is stand alone. The droid has both.

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What Apple means by WLAN and Cellular is that it can find location by cellular service, by wireless lan or by a combination of them, this IS assisted GPS. sGPS is stand alone. The droid has both.

You still have not answered: How come the location works where there is no wlan and no cellular service?

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What Apple means by WLAN and Cellular is that it can find location by cellular service, by wireless lan or by a combination of them, this IS assisted GPS. sGPS is stand alone. The droid has both.

You still have not answered: How come the location works where there is no wlan and no cellular service?

 

This story of aGPS so far seems fairly reasonable and straightforward, but it is not. See aGPS is not some monolithic, written-in-stone-standard. In fact, Qualcomm, who makes the most popular aGPS chips (called GPSOne) has four different possible configurations for aGPS. How aGPS is actually implemented on the device appears to be up to the device OEM/cellular carriers.

 

Per Qualcomm's website, these are the four options:

 

* Standalone - Your handset has no connection to the network, and uses only the GPS satellite signals it can currently receive to try and establish a location.

* MS Based - Your handset is connected to the network, and uses the GPS signals + a location signal from the network.

* MS Assisted - Your handset is connected to the network, uses GPS signals + a location signal then relays its 'fix' to the server, which then uses the signal strength from your phone to the network towers to further plot your position. You can still maintain voice communication in this scenario, but not 'Internet/Network service' ie Web Browser, IM, streaming TV etc..

* MS Assisted/Hybrid - Same as above, but network functionality remains. Normally only in areas with exceptional coverage.

 

So... in a nutshell, don't worry... be happy. You both are right. The Apple has a stand alone GPS that is assisted (enhanced) by AT&T's cellular tower network.

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How did this thread turn into this??? Does it really matter? What I really want to know is, are we any closer to getting this app??? Would love to have it for GW VIII. Thanx neoncacher

 

Knowing a little bit about how your phone interacts with the Geocaching application could never hurt anyone that uses it. It is not like someone was trying to discuss ice cream or something.

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How did this thread turn into this??? Does it really matter? What I really want to know is, are we any closer to getting this app??? Would love to have it for GW VIII. Thanx neoncacher

 

Knowing a little bit about how your phone interacts with the Geocaching application could never hurt anyone that uses it. It is not like someone was trying to discuss ice cream or something.

 

my favorite is Rocky Road...

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There are plenty of apps in the market until the guys a GS can work out the bugs. Would i like a all in one app, absolutely . But until then the 3 I am using seem to works well.

 

Suppose they are alright to name since they are named in previous posts. Currently using ....

[reference to unauthorized application removed by moderator.]

GPS status for radar

Geobeagle

and of course google maps.

 

I do wish there was a all in one program because I end up with lot of program crashes switching all the time, but even then I have been able to post 1 cache and find 14 in the past 2 days of hunting.

 

keep up the work guys, know you are working hard for it and the HTC usrs out here appreciate it !!

Edited by Keystone
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Why wait for an app that ain't workin' right. Even on Apple.

The answer to your problem is an Oregon. :)

A lot of us don't want to spend another 250-400 dollars on a piece of equipment that's functionality is already covered with a Droid/Iphone.

 

I'm using GPS Status and GeoBeagle right now, they work pretty well, though switching around is a pain, and it doesn't log the caches properly. Maybe the Iphone app will make things easier.

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There are plenty of apps in the market until the guys a GS can work out the bugs. Would i like a all in one app, absolutely . But until then the 3 I am using seem to works well.

 

Suppose they are alright to name since they are named in previous posts. Currently using ....

[reference to unauthorized application removed by moderator]

GPS status for radar

Geobeagle

and of course google maps.

 

I do wish there was a all in one program because I end up with lot of program crashes switching all the time, but even then I have been able to post 1 cache and find 14 in the past 2 days of hunting.

 

keep up the work guys, know you are working hard for it and the HTC usrs out here appreciate it !!

What non-free apps have you tried in the market? Seems most users either are using free ones or waiting for the "official" GS app that they will have to pay for. [Reference to unauthorized application removed by moderator] is in violation of the TOS (odd the moderator here allows discussion on it), and Geobeagle seems clunky although it gets the job done.

 

I'd like to see some comparisons of other apps that are not free. I like choice, but it appears the "official "app (whatever that means, LOL) will create a single source market if there is no competition.

Edited by Keystone
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There's eight paid ones that I see. If they go against some copyright, sorry, but IMO, the mod's can't get too uppity until there's an official version, of which I will support.

 

There's Geocacher. It's 15 dollars, the most expensive by far. It also seems to only work on Donut (Android 1.6). The reviews are extremely mixed, and for 15 dollars they should be nothing but minor quibbles. (3 stars overall)

 

Find Geocaches seems to be a simple application that works with GeoBeagle. The reviews are really positive on this one, and they say it integrates will with GeoBeagle. (5 Stars overall)

 

GeOrg is this one. The reviews are mixed, but fairly positive. It's 4.99 Euros, which is about 6.75 USD. It seems to be under some heavy production, and there are some recent bugs. (5 stars overall)

 

GeoFun Another caching application, seems to still need some work and not really well features. It's $6.99. Reviews are positive but really uninformative. (4 stars)

 

GeoDroid - Seems to be a fairly positively reviewed application. It will run you at $7.99. Judging by the reviews, the developers are responsive and try to implement ideas. (4 Stars overall)

 

Geooh - Seems to be a fairly new one, it costs 9.99. There are only two reviews, and they are of no help whatsoever. (3 Stars overall)

 

Cacher - Seems to be another limited caching program. One review shown and it's not too great. (4.25 Stars)

 

Cachemate - Seems to be a fairly well reviewed cache program. A few minor flaws. $8.00 for this one. (4 stars).

 

There are a few of the current paid programs on the market. If anything, I might go with the Find Geocaches if it works with GeoBeagle so well.

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All of the above posts were split off from a thread in the "Geocaching for iPhone" forum. The topic of the thread was about an official Groundspeak application for the Android phone. You can read the original topic here.

 

These posts were taking the "official app" thread off-topic. Feel free to continue the discussions here, so long as you don't discuss the application that violates the Terms of Use. Thank you.

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These posts were taking the "official app" thread off-topic. Feel free to continue the discussions here, so long as you don't discuss the application that violates the Terms of Use. Thank you.

 

Please excuse my stupidity, but how can I avoid using an application that violates Groundspeak's TOS if every mention of it is removed? I am just starting on looking into the Android apps, did I miss a thread somewhere that says don't use this app? I am happy to give my money to Groundspeak as a premium member, and I am eagerly awaiting the official Android app. I definitely don't want to give money to someone taking advantage of Groundspeak's work, but I don't know exactly who that is.

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Feel free to continue the discussions here, so long as you don't discuss the application that violates the Terms of Use. Thank you.

 

Out of curiosity, what does the forbidden app do that violates the TOU?

 

Not trying to be difficult, I truly do not know.

 

Thanks!

 

TeamTJ

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Out of curiosity, what does the forbidden app do that violates the TOU?
It scrapes the site, violating the following section of the terms of use:
5. Access and Interference

Much of the information on the Site is updated on a real time basis and is proprietary or is licensed to Groundspeak by our users or third parties. You agree that you will not use any robot, spider, scraper or other automated means to access the Site for any purpose without our express written permission. Additionally, you agree that you will not: (a) take any action that imposes, or may impose in our sole discretion an unreasonable or disproportionately large load on our infrastructure; or (b) interfere or attempt to interfere with the proper working of the Site or any activities conducted on the Site or other measures we may use to prevent or restrict access to the Site.

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Out of curiosity, what does the forbidden app do that violates the TOU?
It scrapes the site, violating the following section of the terms of use:
5. Access and Interference

Much of the information on the Site is updated on a real time basis and is proprietary or is licensed to Groundspeak by our users or third parties. You agree that you will not use any robot, spider, scraper or other automated means to access the Site for any purpose without our express written permission. Additionally, you agree that you will not: (a) take any action that imposes, or may impose in our sole discretion an unreasonable or disproportionately large load on our infrastructure; or (b ) interfere or attempt to interfere with the proper working of the Site or any activities conducted on the Site or other measures we may use to prevent or restrict access to the Site.

It is not a robot or a spider and there is nothing automated about it. The only thing that even comes close in that statement is the word "scrape" and that is stretching things quite a bit. I've watched enough lawyer shows on TV to know that one could just as easily make the argument that it is just a specialized browser with a custom rendering engine that makes a page request initiated by the user, receives the HTML returned by the server and then renders it (which was intended for large screens) is a compact manner suitable for small screens (think about what screen readers for the blind do... some translate it to a tactile output in the form a braille... is that a violation?). It is a shame because it is hands down the best free (authorized or not) Android app for caching.
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Out of curiosity, what does the forbidden app do that violates the TOU?
It scrapes the site, violating the following section of the terms of use:
5. Access and Interference

Much of the information on the Site is updated on a real time basis and is proprietary or is licensed to Groundspeak by our users or third parties. You agree that you will not use any robot, spider, scraper or other automated means to access the Site for any purpose without our express written permission. Additionally, you agree that you will not: (a) take any action that imposes, or may impose in our sole discretion an unreasonable or disproportionately large load on our infrastructure; or (b ) interfere or attempt to interfere with the proper working of the Site or any activities conducted on the Site or other measures we may use to prevent or restrict access to the Site.

It is not a robot or a spider and there is nothing automated about it. The only thing that even comes close in that statement is the word "scrape" and that is stretching things quite a bit. I've watched enough lawyer shows on TV to know that one could just as easily make the argument that it is just a specialized browser with a custom rendering engine that makes a page request initiated by the user, receives the HTML returned by the server and then renders it (which was intended for large screens) is a compact manner suitable for small screens (think about what screen readers for the blind do... some translate it to a tactile output in the form a braille... is that a violation?). It is a shame because it is hands down the best free (authorized or not) Android app for caching.

Amazing reality distortion...

 

The program is not a specialized browser. It is NOT using HTML to render screens in the way Groundspeak intended. It is pretending to be a browser and then extracting cache data from the HTML (that's is the automated process) before rendering it in the way it wants. A browser is suppose to display HTML exactly as the web site sent it.

 

I am certainly not defending the TOU... and I am not defending the program. Actually, the developer is quite skilled to be able to scrape as effectively as he does so I am impressed. If you are going to defend the program, at least know more about the technology behind it. The program clearly violates the TOU so it is better to argue that the TOU be changed (or API's opened) than to call an apple an orange.

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If all it does is display the data on the page, then it's just a specialized browser, even if it displays the data in a way that is different from how it appears on a typical general-purpose browser. The nature of the web is that the user is in control of the browser, and the browser can override the presentation specified by the designer.

 

But my understanding is that it also processes and stores the data on the page, avoiding the need to load data via authorized mechanisms (e.g., PQs). AIUI, that automated scraping of the site is what Groundspeak objects to.

 

Disclaimer: IANAL, and I while I understand how GeoBeagle works (respecting the Groundspeak TOU), my understanding of [name of app removed by author] is limited to hearsay.

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AIUI, "the app whose name shall not be mentioned" does not store anything. But... even normal browsers have a cache so there may be some wiggle room there anyway.

 

IANAL either but one could probably argue every browser does at least some amount of "processing" between receiving the HTML and displaying it. They have rendering engines that perform this task and... unless the user must specifically instruct the browser to render each time... it does this automatically.

 

Again, IANAL, but I view an automated scraper (robot, etc) as one that, when given a list of GC numbers, goes about its merry way automatically churning through the list, making page requests and recoding the data received. Obviously those can be easily detected by the speed at which it makes the sequence of requests. I'm pretty sure their is some sort of threshold already that will trigger an alarm. But AIUI "the app whose name shall not be mentioned" only reacts to user input... 1 click/tap = 1 page request... keeping that request rate on par with what would be expected from any other user/browser interaction.

 

Bottom line though is that it is the Groundspeak TOU and they can interpret it any way they see fit on any given day. Whether they want to put the smack down on "the app whose name shall not be mentioned" because they see it as a big threat to their upcoming paid app or they really feel it is so naughty with its page requests... we'll never really know.

 

There is a good number of Greasemonkey scripts with the sole purpose of making the browser alter the way it displays the page after it has received the HTML. I imagine a skilled GM scripter with some time on her hands could generate one that would make all the relevant pages on geocaching.com look just like those in "the app whose name shall not be mentioned"... now that would be funny to see. ;)

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As a reminder, the moderating team's request is not to discuss the unauthorized application. That is more than a request to refrain from using the application's name. Thank you.

How do we know what application we can't talk about when you quickly remove any reference to that application?? ;)

 

How helpful is it to say "don't talk about [fill in the blanks] if you haven't filled in the blanks? ;)

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As a reminder, the moderating team's request is not to discuss the unauthorized application. That is more than a request to refrain from using the application's name. Thank you.

How do we know what application we can't talk about when you quickly remove any reference to that application?? :huh:

 

How helpful is it to say "don't talk about [fill in the blanks] if you haven't filled in the blanks? ;)

Dude! What part of DON'T TALK ABOUT IT did you not understand? ;)
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As a reminder, the moderating team's request is not to discuss the unauthorized application. That is more than a request to refrain from using the application's name. Thank you.
IMHO, there would be less need to discuss this in the forums if Groundspeak posted a clear statement somewhere explaining their position regarding [name of app removed by author] violating their TOU.

 

So, back to the topic of apps that we can discuss...

 

GeoBeagle (and apps forked from the GeoBeagle code base) get information from authorized sources: PQs and Google Maps. That's why GeoBeagle has only the information that geocaching.com provides to Google Maps (coordinates and GCxxxxx ID) or the information included in PQ files. These apps carefully avoid getting any information directly from the geocaching.com site.

Edited by niraD
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As a reminder, the moderating team's request is not to discuss the unauthorized application. That is more than a request to refrain from using the application's name. Thank you.
IMHO, there would be less need to discuss this in the forums if Groundspeak posted a clear statement somewhere explaining their position regarding [name of app removed by author] violating their TOU.
well... my dog farted one time and it smelled really really bad. But we all just ignored it and the smell eventually went away.

 

So, back to the topic of apps that we can discuss...

 

GeoBeagle (and apps forked from the GeoBeagle code base) get information from authorized sources: PQs and Google Maps. That's why GeoBeagle has only the information that geocaching.com provides to Google Maps (coordinates and GCxxxxx ID) or the information included in PQ files. These apps carefully avoid getting any information directly from the geocaching.com site.

I suppose I should give GeoBeagle another look. I had it installed for a bit but never got to actually do anything. I never tried it with a PQ because I don't really plan to use my phone for "preplanned" caching... I have a GPS for that. I want my phone for "on the fly" caching when I don't have my GPS with me. Access to live data is essential to that. So if GeoBeagle works like it has been described I'll have to try again. Maybe I was doing something wrong the first time. The UI was not helpful.
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IMHO, there would be less need to discuss this in the forums if Groundspeak posted a clear statement somewhere explaining their position regarding [name of app removed by author] violating their TOU.
well... my dog farted one time and it smelled really really bad. But we all just ignored it and the smell eventually went away.
Except that [name of app removed by author] doesn't smell bad to people who happen upon it in the Android Market. In fact, it smells pretty good to them. Most people don't find out about [name of app removed by author] from any source that is going to tell them that it violates the Groundspeak TOU.

 

"Sweetie, the flowers you gave Mommy are beautiful, and they smell lovely. But you shouldn't have cut them from Mr. Irish's prize rose bushes without his permission..."

 

I suppose I should give GeoBeagle another look. I had it installed for a bit but never got to actually do anything. I never tried it with a PQ because I don't really plan to use my phone for "preplanned" caching... I have a GPS for that. I want my phone for "on the fly" caching when I don't have my GPS with me. Access to live data is essential to that. So if GeoBeagle works like it has been described I'll have to try again. Maybe I was doing something wrong the first time. The UI was not helpful.

The UI has changed a few times. Using GeoBeagle for "on the fly" caching is pretty easy now:
  • Open GeoBeagle.
  • On the welcome screen, select the "geocaching.com" link, which opens the Android browser to the geocaching.com search page with the current coordinates. (You can also use AtlasQuest.com for letterboxes, or one of the OpenCaching sites in Europe.)
  • In the Android browser, view the list of nearby caches, pick one, and navigate to its cache description page.
  • On the cache description page, scroll down to the "For online maps..." list of links, and select the "Google Maps" link.
  • The Android browser will ask whether you want to open the link in the browser, in the native Maps app, in GeoBeagle, or in any other installed apps that register an interest in Google Maps. Select GeoBeagle.

At this point, GeoBeagle has the GCxxxxx ID and coordinates that were provided to Google Maps. You can use those to navigate to the cache. The cache description, hints, logs, etc. are accessible from the cache description page in the Android browser.

 

As long as you have a data connection, you're good. But you'd need a data connection for any "on the fly" caching that isn't covered by your PQ data.

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Except that [name of app removed by author] doesn't smell bad to people who happen upon it in the Android Market. In fact, it smells pretty good to them.
Well of course... the dog didn't mind the smell. But we owned the house and only we are allowed to fart in it. ;)

 

I suppose I should give GeoBeagle another look. I had it installed for a bit but never got to actually do anything. I never tried it with a PQ because I don't really plan to use my phone for "preplanned" caching... I have a GPS for that. I want my phone for "on the fly" caching when I don't have my GPS with me. Access to live data is essential to that. So if GeoBeagle works like it has been described I'll have to try again. Maybe I was doing something wrong the first time. The UI was not helpful.
The UI has changed a few times. Using GeoBeagle for "on the fly" caching is pretty easy now:
  • Open GeoBeagle.
  • On the welcome screen, select the "geocaching.com" link, which opens the Android browser to the geocaching.com search page with the current coordinates. (You can also use AtlasQuest.com for letterboxes, or one of the OpenCaching sites in Europe.)
  • In the Android browser, view the list of nearby caches, pick one, and navigate to its cache description page.
  • On the cache description page, scroll down to the "For online maps..." list of links, and select the "Google Maps" link.
  • The Android browser will ask whether you want to open the link in the browser, in the native Maps app, in GeoBeagle, or in any other installed apps that register an interest in Google Maps. Select GeoBeagle.

At this point, GeoBeagle has the GCxxxxx ID and coordinates that were provided to Google Maps. You can use those to navigate to the cache. The cache description, hints, logs, etc. are accessible from the cache description page in the Android browser.

 

As long as you have a data connection, you're good. But you'd need a data connection for any "on the fly" caching that isn't covered by your PQ data.

ya... just went through those very steps. I must have been doing it wrong before because I didn't get it like that. However, that is not nearly as elegant as... uh... as I've heard it could be. *wink* All that scrolling and trying to tap on teeny-tiny links. If only there was a way to condense all that info into a form more appropriate for a small touch screen. It would be hard to ignore something like that. *sigh* One can dream.
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