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New cache container


antully
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Hi, this is my first post on here, but ive been geocaching for about a year now and ive actually hidden two caches. I have an idea for a cache I wanna make but I want to see what people think before i do it because its well... ill explain

 

...I work at Staples. And we throw out perfectly working stuff all the time because people say its "broken" when they just dont know how to use it. So today, someone returned a metal firesafe safe, and it was "code 16" which means throw away. So I took it since it was trash anyway. Come to find out the guy just didnt know how to use it and it works great! Its a black box about 1 foot by a foot and a half and I was thinking about using it as a cache container! It requires a code that I can set and think it will be and interesting. Maybe I can make it a mystery cache and have people find the code to unlock it? I also really want to stuff it with really cool swag because the caches that ive found never have cool swag in it.

I was planning on placing it deep in a wooded area so no muggles will ever stumble into it, and camo it really well. Any opinions?

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a metal firesafe safe

If it doesn't seal watertight, or if the combination lock may not survive weather extremes (pretty likely), don't risk it outdoors, unless you will have the whole thing inside a waterproof container.

 

Here's one option:

Some State Parks have offices open several days a week. Cache containers are often welcome in the visitors' center, even if caches on park grounds aren't allowed. Talk with a state park person sometime, and see if there's a visitors' center you could place it -- and plan it in a way that is the least extra work for park employees. You can still make it a puzzle, where people have to solve the combination.

Edited by kunarion
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A few questions...

 

Is it waterproof?

Is the combination mechanism waterproof?

Is there a way to secure it in the forest so that it won't migrate?

 

-Yes its a waterproof safe and I can even cover it just incase with waterproof material.

-Not sure the mechanism is, but since it says waterproof on the box I would assume so

-yes there is and its kind of heavy and doubt that anyone would want to lug the thing all the way through the forest

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A few questions...

 

Is it waterproof?

Is the combination mechanism waterproof?

Is there a way to secure it in the forest so that it won't migrate?

 

-Yes its a waterproof safe and I can even cover it just incase with waterproof material.

-Not sure the mechanism is, but since it says waterproof on the box I would assume so

-yes there is and its kind of heavy and doubt that anyone would want to lug the thing all the way through the forest

 

I'd be willing to bet that what it means by "waterproof" is that it will open after being blasted by fire department hoses and/or a building fire suppression system. While that sounds encouraging, it's not the same thing as "waterproof" meaning it will survive weeks, months, or years laying out in the elements where water will seep in slowly or where moisture will constantly be on the lock mechanism.

 

Covering the safe may or may not be benefit. The two points of weakness will be the seal and the lock mechanism. If you can do a test run- leave it in the yard for a month- that would be wise. Again, you're worried about rain falling on the safe, but humidity that is always present in the air and any moisture on the ground itself.

 

I'd also keep this in mind: have a plan B for when/if it does rust shut around the combination tumblers and/or the lock. I'd imagine that those things are a real bear to bust open by force alone.

 

EDIT: Consider selling it on Ebay and grabbing some ammo cans if you decide it won't work (before you leave it in the elements for testing.)

Edited by Castle Mischief
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A few questions...

 

Is it waterproof?

Is the combination mechanism waterproof?

Is there a way to secure it in the forest so that it won't migrate?

 

-Yes its a waterproof safe and I can even cover it just incase with waterproof material.

-Not sure the mechanism is, but since it says waterproof on the box I would assume so

-yes there is and its kind of heavy and doubt that anyone would want to lug the thing all the way through the forest

 

I'd be willing to bet that what it means by "waterproof" is that it will open after being blasted by fire department hoses and/or a building fire suppression system. While that sounds encouraging, it's not the same thing as "waterproof" meaning it will survive weeks, months, or years laying out in the elements where water will seep in slowly or where moisture will constantly be on the lock mechanism.

 

Covering the safe may or may not be benefit. The two points of weakness will be the seal and the lock mechanism. If you can do a test run- leave it in the yard for a month- that would be wise. Again, you're worried about rain falling on the safe, but humidity that is always present in the air and any moisture on the ground itself.

 

I'd also keep this in mind: have a plan B for when/if it does rust shut around the combination tumblers and/or the lock. I'd imagine that those things are a real bear to bust open by force alone.

 

EDIT: Consider selling it on Ebay and grabbing some ammo cans if you decide it won't work (before you leave it in the elements for testing.)

 

 

Ahh yes. Thank you very much. This is what I needed. I didn't think of it like that, and it probably would break after a while because the lock is electronic and after the snowfall of a couple years it probably wont work and the lock mechanism on the inside it 2 giant bolts which would probably get rusted over some time.

 

So now the question is... is there a safe that is strong enough that can last out in the middle of the woods for years resisting snow and ice? and if so where could I get it? Or if there was a way to preserve the safe I already have if I placed it in some other location besides a wooded surrounding, like rocks or a small cave. or maybe even some sort of cover that shields the entire thing. (I'm just brainstorming now)

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So now the question is... is there a safe that is strong enough that can last out in the middle of the woods for years resisting snow and ice? and if so where could I get it? Or if there was a way to preserve the safe I already have if I placed it in some other location besides a wooded surrounding, like rocks or a small cave. or maybe even some sort of cover that shields the entire thing. (I'm just brainstorming now)

 

Most of the sucsessful combo-lock caches I've heard about took a proven container (ammo can) and applied a lock to it- either with steel cables or by enclosing it in an outer cage of some sort.

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i like the idea of a safe which needs the right combination to open. i've come across some caches like that in the wild, but none actually being a proper safe.

 

if the safe proves not to be waterproof per se, but at least able to sustain the elements without taking damage itself (that is, the mechanism will still work and it won't rust away), you can always put a better box (read lock 'n' lock) inside the safe and use it that way. i've seen a few caches like that in the wild as well (but again, not with a proper safe either).

Edited by dfx
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I have a similar safe that weighs 34lbs and takes a key. I was thinking about doing the same and hiding it under a small waterfall. My main concern is the lock itself. Waterproof like has been mentioned above could mean that it is waterproof to a certain extent. A flooded house where the safe is pulled back out within a week might be considered waterproof. Constant water and silt, sand, and other debris could clog the locking mechanism right up. I still have to find the key to check it out but I think its big enough to hold a 30cal. Even then under a constant flow of water I would put the log in yet another waterproof container inside the ammo can inside the safe. I'd really hate to go through all of that just to have the lock jam up though. Is there a way to waterproof the lock for long term underwater use? Swiz

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I have a similar safe that weighs 34lbs and takes a key. I was thinking about doing the same and hiding it under a small waterfall. My main concern is the lock itself. Waterproof like has been mentioned above could mean that it is waterproof to a certain extent. A flooded house where the safe is pulled back out within a week might be considered waterproof. Constant water and silt, sand, and other debris could clog the locking mechanism right up. I still have to find the key to check it out but I think its big enough to hold a 30cal. Even then under a constant flow of water I would put the log in yet another waterproof container inside the ammo can inside the safe. I'd really hate to go through all of that just to have the lock jam up though. Is there a way to waterproof the lock for long term underwater use? Swiz

 

I just got off the phone with Madam Zorbonski, my personal psychic. She sees a future where the FTF opens your safe... while it's still under the waterfall. Ouch.

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I am certain you violated Staples company policy.. :)

 

haha. I hate staples. that place sucks. plus my maneger was the one who was like "take it!" It gets thrown out, so I dont see the harm in "recycling" lol.

 

but yea, now im kind of reconsidering all this cause if i ever have to replace it, id have to pay for it this time. I just really want a nice giant box that requires a lock. and I really want cool swag in my area, because all of the caches near me don't have cool things in it. I might just get a regular container and get a cheap lock or something then... well see...

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On the waterproof note: Have you ever seen a fireproof safe after a fire? Most of them require a welding torch to open. The contents are safe, but the safe is useless. I have a feeling the waterproof part of this is similer. The contents may remain dry after exposure, but the safe is useless, requiring "other" means of opening it. I saw an ammo can just yesterday that had a lock applied to it. Seemed to work well as it was snowing out and the contents were dry.

 

M24

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I saw an ammo can just yesterday that had a lock applied to it.

 

These do work pretty well, yeah. We encountered one recently that was super tough to open, but a little WD40 and it opened smoothly. Thankfully we had that in the car or I think it would've been a DNF. :)

 

I buddy of mine had a similar set up with his ammo can. Some one took the ammo can and the next cachers logged a DNF. The cache returned after the DNF with a screwed up lock. The key to the lock was on a TB and was suppose to stay in the area. You find the key first and then hunt down the cache. It worked for about a year before the key TB came up missing. The lock ended up getting cut off and now its just a regular cache with a puzzle icon.

 

I was thinking about using some type of foam plug to cover the keyhole and a strip of rubber from a small bike inner tube to hold it in place. It would just need to be slipped over the whole safe. If you do plan on using the safe then make it a harder cache to find and place the safe a distance from the main road. Less visitors on a tougher cache means its less likely to need replacing. Swiz

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There's a puzzle cache on the Space Coast that requires the seeker to find a picture CD, with embedded clues. The owner left a few CDs scattered about area caches, asking that those folks who take them for viewing purposes hide them in a different cache than the one they found it in, without revealing which cache they hid it in. Kinda like a non-trackable travel bug. It can prove quite tricky to get your mitts on one of these, so when I finally stumbled across one, I was delighted. The final stage was one of those fire safes. The contents were sitting in stagnant water. Definitely not water proof. Heck, I'd barely call it water resistant. That's the bad news.

 

The good news is, you can shop around for a big ammo can to drop it in.

That way your contents stay dry, and you get to employ the safe as an integral part of your hide.

Sounds like a hoot! :)

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haha. I hate staples. that place sucks. plus my maneger was the one who was like "take it!" It gets thrown out, so I dont see the harm in "recycling" lol

 

A word to the wise, a friend of mine got canned from her job of ten years for the same thing. Recently.

I'm pretty sure that since the boss told him to take it that he is fairly well insulated from disciplinary action, as long as he wasn't the one who decided that the item should be disposed of.

 

To the thread's actual topic, the cache would be cool, but probably only for the first couple of seekers.

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Inside my safe is a sticker that says "AS TO FIRE RESISTANCE - RATING: CLASS 350-1HR" So this thing should start melting around the temperature that it takes to bake a cake. It also says that its not meant to store firearms, other weapons, combustable materials, (isn't paper combustable?), or medication. It does have a nice soft rubber gasket on the inside and a 30 cal fits in it rather nicely. There's gotta be a good way to keep the lock from rusting without filling the keyhole full of WD40. Swiz

Edited by swizzle
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Inside my safe is a sticker that says "AS TO FIRE RESISTANCE - RATING: CLASS 350-1HR" So this thing should start melting around the temperature that it takes to bake a cake. It also says that its not meant to store firearms, other weapons, combustable materials, (isn't paper combustable?), or medication. It does have a nice soft rubber gasket on the inside and a 30 cal fits in it rather nicely. There's gotta be a good way to keep the lock from rusting without filling the keyhole full of WD4. Swiz

 

The 350 rating doesn't mean it will melt at 350 degrees. It means that if it's in a fire, the temperature inside will get as high as 350 degrees. This is well below the point at which paper will catch fire: 451, as all Ray Bradbury fans know.

 

WD40 is wonderful stuff, but is not good for locks. It will eventually dry out and get sticky, and then it traps every tiny bit of dust, causing the mechanism to wear. Powdered graphite is the best lubricant for a lock, although it won't keep water out of it.

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There's a puzzle cache on the Space Coast that requires the seeker to find a picture CD, with embedded clues. The owner left a few CDs scattered about area caches, asking that those folks who take them for viewing purposes hide them in a different cache than the one they found it in, without revealing which cache they hid it in. Kinda like a non-trackable travel bug. It can prove quite tricky to get your mitts on one of these, so when I finally stumbled across one, I was delighted. The final stage was one of those fire safes. The contents were sitting in stagnant water. Definitely not water proof. Heck, I'd barely call it water resistant. That's the bad news.

 

The good news is, you can shop around for a big ammo can to drop it in.

That way your contents stay dry, and you get to employ the safe as an integral part of your hide.

Sounds like a hoot! :P

 

This idea sounds reallly cool. about the travling puzzle! I think i wanna do something like that. make a travel bug that states that this cannot leave the state or city, because its part of another cache, but have the travel bug trackable and people have to figure out the bugs name in order to find the page, in order to find where its hidded and on the bug is coords or a key that will solve the mystery and have the cobination number on it! i really want to do that!

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The CD wasn't a trackable, which added to the difficulty in locating it.

 

There's a cache in North Florida which has two locks on it, each with a different key.

The owner created a TB out of each key and turned them loose, asking that they stay in North Florida.

For the most part they do. Occasionally, the owner has to put a copy into circulation.

It was a lot of fun chasing down the twp TBs to open the cache.

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There's a cache in North Florida which has two locks on it, each with a different key.

The owner created a TB out of each key and turned them loose, asking that they stay in North Florida.

For the most part they do. Occasionally, the owner has to put a copy into circulation.

It was a lot of fun chasing down the twp TBs to open the cache.

 

There's a very similar but very different cache in North Carolina. It has 5 travel-bug keys. You only need one of them to open it.

 

The problem is that they have all been released in foreign countries. So those of us watching the cache and all the travel bugs either have to do some serious traveling, or wait for one of the bugs to make its way home.

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On the waterproof note: Have you ever seen a fireproof safe after a fire? Most of them require a welding torch to open.

Doesn't the welding torch incinerate the contents the moment in breaks through? :P

 

These types of consumer safes have hinges that are on the outside of the box. Cutting it open only requires cutting the hinges leaving the contents unharmed (unless the torch is wielded by a maniac). The bolts securing the contents are only on one side (opposite the hinges).

 

EDIT to Add: This is an excellent cache idea but as others have said even with a key based lock the likelihood of it lasting any lenght of time before it was inoperable is very low unless you can somehow shield it from rain and high humidity. Sounds like a good candidate for a park lodge, rangers office or other similar location in a nice park.

Edited by Jeep4two
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Send me an email, if they 'Code-16' any technology items. :laughing:

 

Sorry, I had to..

 

The only thing you might want to be careful of, is since the item was still story inventory (even if it was discarded as trash.) some municipalities frown upon salvaging items deemed 'Destroy" by the owner (meaning the store)

 

I know, I hate loopholes too...

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