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Official Geocaching Merit Badge Requirements


hoyshnin
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The official requirements of the new Geocaching Merit Badge have been released.

 

Here's the link to a quick article about it:

http://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2010/04/o...s-released.html

 

And here are the requirements:

http://scoutingmag.typepad.com/files/geocaching_mb.pdf

 

My initial thoughts: As an Eagle Scout, I'm excited to see the BSA jumping into geocaching. I'm a little disappointed that the requirements only call for 1 find, it would be nice if it were 5 or 10 instead. Also, one of requirements that you can choose to do (there are other requirements you can choose to do instead of this one) is that you hide a geocache. I hope there aren't a proliferation of newbie hides because of the merit badge. Finally, I was confused by the requirement to explain how to "dismantle a geocache." What does that mean? Explain how to open a geocache? How to archive it?

 

All in all, though, I've very pleased to see the new merit badge. I hope my younger brothers, who are scouts, go for it and add this one to their sash!

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I have never been a scout, hopefully, my opinions here are not seen as in insult of any kind to scouts.

 

I am also disappointed that hiding a cache is an option for the badge. While there will probably be several new good hides from this, anyone, anyone without a measure of experience is likely not to have a good understanding what a good hide is. Therefore, many poor hides. (Now that I think of it, several experience cachers have hidden clunkers. :wub:) In addition, when they get out of scouting and move on to the next phase of their life are, in general, likely to forget about geocaching and leave their cache unmaintained. Why is one of the requirements to only have a plan to maintain it for 6 months, and only three months by themselves?

 

Reading the requirements, they way it is worded, it sounds like dismantling is their term for archiving.

 

I am happy that geocaching is growing, and hopefully the BSA will bring in several new long term cachers.

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I would have the scout find a Traditional Cache, a Multi-Cache (Offset Cache), and a Puzzle Cache and the explain why someone might hide those different types. Convert from Decimal minutes to Decimal Degrees and back using only pencil and paper. Explain why someone might want to become a geocacher.

 

Just my thoughts.

I like those.

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I agree that one find is not enough - unless they do the Geocaching to Eagle requirement. Oh well. I also agree that finding one of each type would be preferable but may not be available to every boy in the USA without difficulty and that may have been the reason for the ommission.

 

On the issue of a scout hiding a cache, recall that each Scout must have a Merit Badge Counselor that provides guidance. As those folks will likley be some of us, I trust that most (certainly not all) will be well hidden followling guidelines. I'd hope the Counselor as he/she passes along the fun of our sport / hobby will encorage and support the finding of multiple caches of many different types so that the boy is really "hooked" like we are.

 

Eagle73DTB

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I agree that one find is not enough - unless they do the Geocaching to Eagle requirement. Oh well. I also agree that finding one of each type would be preferable but may not be available to every boy in the USA without difficulty and that may have been the reason for the ommission.

 

On the issue of a scout hiding a cache, recall that each Scout must have a Merit Badge Counselor that provides guidance. As those folks will likley be some of us, I trust that most (certainly not all) will be well hidden followling guidelines. I'd hope the Counselor as he/she passes along the fun of our sport / hobby will encorage and support the finding of multiple caches of many different types so that the boy is really "hooked" like we are.

 

Eagle73DTB

 

I have already offered to be the councilor for my troop. I plan on having them find at least one of the following: Traditional, Multi, Mystery.

Also anyone I advise that seem to not be in it for the long haul will probably use my account (with their name in the "hidden by" field) for the purposes of long term care.

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Reading the requirements, under section 8.

It says do one of the following.

 

I don't like it, it should be do all except the TB portion and "If a Cache to Eagle series exists in your council, visit at least three of the locations in the series" should be 5 and if none then at least 10.

Setting up a public hide should only be done after requirement A has been satisfied.

 

But hey, I know my 6 year old will have the requirement more than completed when the time comes. :wub:

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I think it's good that a badge is even offered. I had told a friend of mine that geocaching would be great for her son's scouts group and two days later, I saw the tweet for this. I think once they find the first one, they'll be hooked and will continue as scout activities and/or on their own.

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Great idea!

It looks like they put some effort into the idea.

I can see that it will include learning how to find a cache, and also how to responsibly hide and archive one.

The scout will need to figure out how all those numbers work, and how to find their way around by using a gps. The scout will need to figure out how the website works. The scout will need to figure out how to use a website to list their cache, and will experience the excitement when someone finds the cache they hid.

I like the fact that it will include the process to remove and close out the process.

Scouts are taught to clean up their campsites, and to tread lightly.

They will be a positive influence on the sport/hobby.

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I think it's a great idea. Perfect? No, however what is, right? Here's a few positives; I would think that chances are they scouts aren't going to be placing many LPCs. We're more likely to get a few more decent/good "nature" caches from some of these kids. As was stated earlier, they're taught to tread lightly so I would also expect that there aren't going to be an excess of cheap/crappy containers going down, and they won't be tearing the area up to place them. Will the hides last more than 6 months? Maybe, maybe not, but at least there will be a decent hide to go find for 6 months. I also think that over the next couple years the badge requirements could develop into something a little bit more involved and long term. Or not, just a guess on my part.

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I think it all comes down to who the merit badge counselor is. If that individual is a conscientious cacher that lives by the rules, both written and unwritten, about what the sport is supposed to be about; adventure, comraderie, seeing the great things our world has to offer and having fun in the outdoors all will be good. Stressing numbers of caches found only leads to too many P & Gs and not enough adventure. What I think needs to be stressed is as I tell my scouts, "Its all about the journey." I include here both your own journey but also the journey you want others to take when you plan your caches. I will be the geocaching merit badge coiunselor for Troop 627 in Vermont and we will certainly be doing more than one!

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I pretty much like the badge but I do have a question about the UTM requirement. Can anyone shed any light on why that is in there? I thought it might be because TOPO maps use UTM but the ones from the USGS are not UTM.

 

The only time I've cared about UTM was when we were at Philmont last summer and used it to double-check ourselves on their topo maps.

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I'm thrilled that BSA is embracing geocaching this year but I also wondered about the UTM requirement. I've been a scout leader for about ten years and a cacher for two, and I'd never heard of UTM. It's always good to learn something new, I just wonder what value it has.

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I, too have been anxiously awaiting the final version of the requirements. I've already filled out the paperwork to be a counselor and all 5 of my current Wood Badge ticket items revolve around geocaching. One of them is to set up a Cache to Eagle series in my council. I guess I'd better hurry on that one.

 

I'm a bit flumoxed on the UTM requirement, too. I'm going to have to brush up on what it is and how to plot it on a map. Never had to deal with that in the 4 years and 1,500 or so caches we've been at this.

 

I think the pamphlet will be an interesting read and will help us counselors-to-be understand the direction the creators of the badge were trying to go.

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I'm thrilled that BSA is embracing geocaching this year but I also wondered about the UTM requirement. I've been a scout leader for about ten years and a cacher for two, and I'd never heard of UTM. It's always good to learn something new, I just wonder what value it has.

 

Its a lot easier to calculate the distance between points, but of course the GPS does that for you as long as you have batteries. :)

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no amount of requirements will make everyone happy. ultimately, it all falls to the counselor and scout. if it is handled at one of those merit badge day events, it'll be severely lacking in quality. at this point though, my son could do most of this today - and WE are preparing to release our first hide - with or without the badge. i've also volunteered to be the counselor, as i'd hate for any scout to venture onto this forum asking questions.

 

as for those that think the GC realm will now be cluttered with poorly executed caches by 14 year olds must be living in the dream land of professional geocachers where all hides are a 5/5 - and there are zero 35 mm film cans strapped to fence posts. <_<

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I assume the badge is for 'geocaching' not 'signing up to geocaching.com website'.

 

I see no reason why the scouts should need to follow any Groundspeak guidelines or demands of the geocaching community. They could just as easily place their own temporary geocaches wherever they liked and keep it all in the scout community.

 

Granted having them list on geocaching.com would be a boon, but it's not necessary. It's a bit like getting a merit for camping, but only if you purchase a Vango Tent and camp at Vango approved camp sites.

 

Some of us may be more experienced at doing this but we don't own the hobby, it's something anyone can take part with or without our permission, way of doing things, or a specific website.

 

Flame-suit on. <_<

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I assume the badge is for 'geocaching' not 'signing up to geocaching.com website'.

 

I see no reason why the scouts should need to follow any Groundspeak guidelines or demands of the geocaching community. They could just as easily place their own temporary geocaches wherever they liked and keep it all in the scout community.

 

Granted having them list on geocaching.com would be a boon, but it's not necessary. It's a bit like getting a merit for camping, but only if you purchase a Vango Tent and camp at Vango approved camp sites.

 

Some of us may be more experienced at doing this but we don't own the hobby, it's something anyone can take part with or without our permission, way of doing things, or a specific website.

 

Flame-suit on. <_<

 

The guidelines actually do specify logging on and signing up.

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I assume the badge is for 'geocaching' not 'signing up to geocaching.com website'.

 

I see no reason why the scouts should need to follow any Groundspeak guidelines or demands of the geocaching community. They could just as easily place their own temporary geocaches wherever they liked and keep it all in the scout community.

 

Granted having them list on geocaching.com would be a boon, but it's not necessary. It's a bit like getting a merit for camping, but only if you purchase a Vango Tent and camp at Vango approved camp sites.

 

Some of us may be more experienced at doing this but we don't own the hobby, it's something anyone can take part with or without our permission, way of doing things, or a specific website.

 

Flame-suit on. <_<

 

The guidelines actually do specify logging on and signing up.

 

I see. Didn't click through to the guidelines link as I didn't have the time to study it... I'm surprised signing up to the website would be part of the requirement.

 

Are other scouting activities commercialised in this way? Sorry I was in boy scouts and it's been a while since I did that anyway.

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I assume the badge is for 'geocaching' not 'signing up to geocaching.com website'.

 

I see no reason why the scouts should need to follow any Groundspeak guidelines or demands of the geocaching community. They could just as easily place their own temporary geocaches wherever they liked and keep it all in the scout community.

 

Granted having them list on geocaching.com would be a boon, but it's not necessary. It's a bit like getting a merit for camping, but only if you purchase a Vango Tent and camp at Vango approved camp sites.

 

Some of us may be more experienced at doing this but we don't own the hobby, it's something anyone can take part with or without our permission, way of doing things, or a specific website.

 

Flame-suit on. <_<

 

The guidelines actually do specify logging on and signing up.

 

Are there guidelines on the geocaching site about how old you have to be to create an account? On the letterboxing site I'm a member of, it's 13 years or older.

 

Also, is maintenance specifically mentioned in the Scout guidelines? If so, are children expected to be able to maintain a cache they likely can't maintain without the help of an adult (driving, accompanying them to the cache location, purchasing supplies container, swag, logbook).

Edited by Lone R
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I assume the badge is for 'geocaching' not 'signing up to geocaching.com website'.

 

I see no reason why the scouts should need to follow any Groundspeak guidelines or demands of the geocaching community. They could just as easily place their own temporary geocaches wherever they liked and keep it all in the scout community.

 

Granted having them list on geocaching.com would be a boon, but it's not necessary. It's a bit like getting a merit for camping, but only if you purchase a Vango Tent and camp at Vango approved camp sites.

 

Some of us may be more experienced at doing this but we don't own the hobby, it's something anyone can take part with or without our permission, way of doing things, or a specific website.

 

Flame-suit on. <_<

 

The guidelines actually do specify logging on and signing up.

 

Are there guidelines on the geocaching site about how old you have to be to create an account? On the letterboxing site I'm a member of, it's 13 years or older.

 

Also, is maintenance specifically mentioned in the Scout guidelines? If so, are children expected to be able to maintain a cache they likely can't maintain without the help of an adult (driving, accompanying them to the cache location, purchasing supplies container, swag, logbook).

 

First, I can't find anything on the website about a minimum age requirement.

 

Second, requirement #2:

2. Discuss the following with your counselor:

a. Why you should never bury a cache

b. How to use proper geocaching etiquette when hiding or seeking a cache, and how to properly hide, post, maintain, and dismantle a geocache

c. The principles of Leave No Trace as they apply to geocaching

so the Scout must at least have had a discussion regarding maintenance.

 

Third, they don't HAVE to hide a cache to get the badge. Requirement #8:

8. Do ONE of the following:

a. If a Cache to Eagle series exists in your council, visit at least three of the locations in the series. Describe the projects that each cache you visit highlights, and explain how the Cache to Eagle program helps share our Scouting service with the public.

b. Create a Scouting-related Travel Bug® that promotes one of the values of Scouting. "Release" your Travel Bug into a public geocache and, with your parent's permission, monitor its progress at www.geocaching.com for 30 days. Keep a log, and share this with your counselor at the end of the 30-day period.

c. Set up and hide a public geocache, following the guidelines in the Geocaching merit badge pamphlet. Before doing so, share with your counselor a six-month maintenance plan for the geocache where you are personally responsible for the first three months. After setting up the geocache, with your parent's permission, follow the logs online for 30 days and share them with your counselor.

d. Explain what Cache in Trash Out (CITO) means, and describe how you have practiced CITO at public geocaches or at a CITO event. Then, either create CITO containers to leave at public caches, or host a CITO event for your unit or for the public.

Hope this helps.

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I assume the badge is for 'geocaching' not 'signing up to geocaching.com website'.

 

I see no reason why the scouts should need to follow any Groundspeak guidelines or demands of the geocaching community. They could just as easily place their own temporary geocaches wherever they liked and keep it all in the scout community.

 

Granted having them list on geocaching.com would be a boon, but it's not necessary. It's a bit like getting a merit for camping, but only if you purchase a Vango Tent and camp at Vango approved camp sites.

 

Some of us may be more experienced at doing this but we don't own the hobby, it's something anyone can take part with or without our permission, way of doing things, or a specific website.

 

Flame-suit on. :P

 

The guidelines actually do specify logging on and signing up.

 

Are there guidelines on the geocaching site about how old you have to be to create an account? On the letterboxing site I'm a member of, it's 13 years or older.

 

Also, is maintenance specifically mentioned in the Scout guidelines? If so, are children expected to be able to maintain a cache they likely can't maintain without the help of an adult (driving, accompanying them to the cache location, purchasing supplies container, swag, logbook).

 

First, I can't find anything on the website about a minimum age requirement.

 

Second, requirement #2:

2. Discuss the following with your counselor:

a. Why you should never bury a cache

b. How to use proper geocaching etiquette when hiding or seeking a cache, and how to properly hide, post, maintain, and dismantle a geocache

c. The principles of Leave No Trace as they apply to geocaching

so the Scout must at least have had a discussion regarding maintenance.

 

Third, they don't HAVE to hide a cache to get the badge. Requirement #8:

8. Do ONE of the following:

a. If a Cache to Eagle series exists in your council, visit at least three of the locations in the series. Describe the projects that each cache you visit highlights, and explain how the Cache to Eagle program helps share our Scouting service with the public.

b. Create a Scouting-related Travel Bug® that promotes one of the values of Scouting. "Release" your Travel Bug into a public geocache and, with your parent's permission, monitor its progress at www.geocaching.com for 30 days. Keep a log, and share this with your counselor at the end of the 30-day period.

c. Set up and hide a public geocache, following the guidelines in the Geocaching merit badge pamphlet. Before doing so, share with your counselor a six-month maintenance plan for the geocache where you are personally responsible for the first three months. After setting up the geocache, with your parent's permission, follow the logs online for 30 days and share them with your counselor.

d. Explain what Cache in Trash Out (CITO) means, and describe how you have practiced CITO at public geocaches or at a CITO event. Then, either create CITO containers to leave at public caches, or host a CITO event for your unit or for the public.

Hope this helps.

 

Thanks for that. I'm still having a hard time grasping how a child is expected to maintain a cache. If there's a report 3 weeks after the hide that the container's lid had cracked and the container needs replacing, what is the child expected to do? It's not spelled out in the above guidelines. If the child talks to the scout leader and it is determined that the child can't maintain the cache, does that mean he doesn't get the merit badge?

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I agree that the badge requirements should include finding at least one of each type of geocache...a well-rounded Scout.

 

As for counciling of this new merit badge, IMHO, a well prepared Geocaching Counselor should be able to guide a Scout in all aspects of this merit badge (planning, construction, placement and maintenance) so that a scout can produce a well executed cache container using scout skills, e.g., those learned from other merit badges (there are over 100!). If one were to plan out a scout's activity in this merit badge well enough, a scout going for this merit badge could learn/use skills that can be applied to/from other merit badges (e.g., geology, woodworking, drafting, forestry, hiking surveying). The possibilities for engaging a scout in this hobby are as various as the merit badges themselves.

 

I'm thinking of becoming a counselor for my son's troop. :P

Edited by Geoides
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I agree that the badge requirements should include finding at least one of each type of geocache...a well-rounded Scout.

 

As for counciling of this new merit badge, IMHO, a well prepared Geocaching Counselor should be able to guide a Scout in all aspects of this merit badge (planning, construction, placement and maintenance) so that a scout can produce a well executed cache container using scout skills, e.g., those learned from other merit badges (there are over 100!). If one were to plan out a scout's activity in this merit badge well enough, a scout going for this merit badge could learn/use skills that can be applied to/from other merit badges (e.g., geology, woodworking, drafting, forestry, hiking surveying). The possibilities for engaging a scout in this hobby are as various as the merit badges themselves.

 

I'm thinking of becoming a counselor for my son's troop. :)

 

A few notes.. Some areas do not have many caches at all, and do not have different kinds. Making the requirement to visit a specific kind or type of cache would be foolish, and put it out of the range of many youth.

 

Remember as a merit badge you cannot require more, nor can you accept less then their best to accomplish the badge. As a scoutmaster if I find a chancellor requires more then the book, I call the councilor and if they don't change, I will send the youth to another.

 

Some of the people approving the badge have an "old map" mentality. Remember geocachers present the idea and come up with initial requirements, but a committee reviews the requirements. In this case the committee felt there needed to be some "old school" understanding of maps, even if we, as cachers never use it.

 

I have already heard whining about not allowing other web sites. This site is free for all, anyone can sign up and place, and the guidelines promote responsible use, and permission being obtained. That fits the mission of the BSA. No money is required, no sponsors, and lots of caches about everywhere.

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As an Assistant Scoutmaster I am excited that BSA has embraced Geocaching. As a matter of fact I was introduced to caching while on a campout with our troop. Are the requirements perfect, who knows, everyone's ideal is different. BSA will most likely tweak things over the next few years anyways. They can sell more booklets that way (ok off soapbox, back on topic) As many have stated hopefully the counselors will do right by the sport and encourage the scouts to be good stewards. I think it's great and will entice more scouts to consider caching as an activity with the extra motivation to earn the badge.

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I hope Scouts Canada hops on board. I've already did a little introduction with our troup. A badge might help them focus more.

 

I know of troops that use the troop specialty badge for this. As you already know that badge is at the discretion of the troop to make their own requirements for something that they do of their own interests. This is a perfect place to use the specialty badge and make appropriate requirements such as number of finds or quality of hide, etc.

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I would object to making at least one hide as a requirement because that is the wrong reason to make a hide and it might not be maintained after all the requirement are met. Cache should be hidden after a passionate desire to take someone to this place is established. However the scout should be able to discuss the requirement to hide one and the methods to carry that out!

 

I would like to see 10 finds and the ability to get the co-ordinates in without assistance. Also 1 bag of CITO is a must.

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I would object to making at least one hide as a requirement because that is the wrong reason to make a hide and it might not be maintained after all the requirement are met. Cache should be hidden after a passionate desire to take someone to this place is established. However the scout should be able to discuss the requirement to hide one and the methods to carry that out!

 

I would like to see 10 finds and the ability to get the co-ordinates in without assistance. Also 1 bag of CITO is a must.

 

I agree completely. I remember Basketry merit badge at summer camp as one of those quick and easy badges that many of us got just to fufill a requirement. Hiding a cache, and forgetting about it would occur all too easy. Perhaps a requirement to maintain it for 6 mos. would work.

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When I heard about the new Centennial Merit Badges last year, I was happy to hear that it would be a GPS navigation badge. I thought it could have one of the requirements geocaching related. I did not know what the requirements would be so I thought I would get a head start and wrote up some GPS basics that we have worked on during some hikes. We started with saving tracks, converting them and displaying them on some mapping programs. I convinced some fathers to buy GPSrs (2 got PN40s.) One brings his laptop to meetings and plots out planned hikes on the Delorme Topo program.

 

I just saw the Geocache MB requirements a few days ago. Of course I would have some items different, but it looks good. I will be signing up as a counselor --actually swapping because in our Council we are allowed to be counselor for 6 badges at a time. It should be fun and it will be, and Scouts will learn some GPS navigation skills.

 

EScout: Troop Committee Chair, Merit Badge Counselor, former Scoutmaster, father of two Eagle Scouts.

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I have a related question and apologize if this is not the correct place to post. Our local Cub Scout pack held an event on learning geocaching and hid and found some temporary caches. They would like to place a TB with some goals of where to travel. I'd like to set up an account so all of them can log in (but not edit or manage) to see where the TB is traveling. Is this possible, or do I just register the TB to my account and provide updates to the pack?

 

Again, I apologize if I should not have posted in this thread, but knew you all would be able to point me in the right direction. Thank you for any help you can provide!

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I have a related question and apologize if this is not the correct place to post. Our local Cub Scout pack held an event on learning geocaching and hid and found some temporary caches. They would like to place a TB with some goals of where to travel. I'd like to set up an account so all of them can log in (but not edit or manage) to see where the TB is traveling. Is this possible, or do I just register the TB to my account and provide updates to the pack?

 

Again, I apologize if I should not have posted in this thread, but knew you all would be able to point me in the right direction. Thank you for any help you can provide!

 

Someone with more experience can correct me if I'm wrong but there should be 2 numbers for a TB, one is a reference number and if you create a generic account for them they could use the ref# to go online and read the details of a TB and its travels. The actual tracking number on the TB I would register and keep on your account or another "administrator" type account because with the tracking number you can log finds and everything else and the actual owner account could edit everything about the TB and delete/modify logs, etc.

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I would have the scout find a Traditional Cache, a Multi-Cache (Offset Cache), and a Puzzle Cache and the explain why someone might hide those different types. Convert from Decimal minutes to Decimal Degrees and back using only pencil and paper. Explain why someone might want to become a geocacher.

 

Just my thoughts.

Very good thoughts. As it stands, a Scout can find a single lamppost cache and be finished - missing the point entirely, IMHO.

 

I dislike the direct tie-in to geocaching.com. Merit Badge Counselors have some discretion with the requirements (or at least used to, when I earned my Eagle 15 years ago), and shouldn't fault a Scout for using one of the other listing services/websites that are out there.

 

I'm having a hard time understanding #6:

Describe the four steps to finding your first cache to your counselor. Then mark and edit a waypoint.
How does one relate to the other specifically for caching?

 

I like that trackables are part of the requirements, but a 30-day log of a trackable the Scout sends out into the wild? That could be pretty disappointing - many trackables get lost quickly, and many sit idle for a very long time. What if your log consists of "Day 1: Released travel bug. Day 30: Travel bug still sitting where I left it. Remind me why I did this again?"

 

The badge is a good start, I just worry about caches created for it becoming abandoned quickly (or generally being poor quality), or caches hunted poorly & quickly muggled afterward. The requirements seem very disjointed, definitely drawn up by committee.

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Do the Scouts still actively discriminate against homosexuals and agnostics and atheists? I'd think Groundspeak wouldn't want to be associated with such bigotry, but perhaps that's just me....

That's the official policy at the national level, but the individual councils & troops tend to not be as discriminatory, from what I have heard. I think the troops which are chartered by non-religious organizations are more liberal (for lack of a better word - I'm not trying to use it in the strictly political sense) than those which are sponsored by churches (a majority probably are still church-sponsored though).

 

I spent a large part of my childhood in the BSA; either it was before such policies came about, or my local troop & council didn't actively participate in those policies (we were not sponsored by a religious organization at all).

 

Fortunately I have a few more years before I have to decide whether my son will participate in Scouts or not, so I've got some time to check out the local leadership on these policies.

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The Bay Area council here in Texas is getting in the game and we are making a "practice" course for the boys to hunt and find as part of their class for the badge. They will have to hide caches for their event that they will hold for other scouts if that event is at a scout camp. We are all pumped and have just started a committee to get things going. My co-chair and I have come up with a great worksheet to aid the boys and has sent it to the merit badge powers that be, so hopefully you all can use it. The badge is a great way for the scouts to practice all those wonderful skills they have been learning over the years and can make attaining other requirements fun also. You can have them geocache while finding native plants or animals for example. On a personal note, I like it because as a geocacher/scout mom, I am able to become more involved in his patrol and our council. It is a bonding time for parents and kids when you share a hobby.

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My quick idea...It should be a point system.....You need 15 points to get your badge. You get 1 point for each star of your cache. so a 1 terrain + 1 difficulty gives you 2 points....

 

2 terrain and a 4 1/2 difficulty gives you 6 1/2 points. That way they can get their experience. Each scout must turn in at least TWO different types as well, regular and a multi? Maybe throw in a benchmark?

 

I dunno, just my idea...That way they can't go out and get only 1 or 2 easy quick grabs.....They have to put some effort into it.

 

Someone with little to no experience should be hiding caches either.....Just my opinion! I'm glad the sport is getting some recognition!

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