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Is it just vegas?


Jtroia13
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They're everywhere.

 

I don't mind them in some situations, but when there are better places to hide a cache close by, they're annoying.

 

Exactly! I don't mind micros or even nanos. They have their place.

There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

I live downtown and someone managed to hide an ammo can in a tiny park within walking distance of my condo (walking distance is about 5 blocks for me).

It has survived for several years.

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There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

Sorry for the side track, but this makes me curious. If a ravine is deep enough does the 0.1 mile rule work vertically too?

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There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

Sorry for the side track, but this makes me curious. If a ravine is deep enough does the 0.1 mile rule work vertically too?

 

It does not from what I have been told and seen... It seems to be horizontal and they don't care about the vertical unless there is an "extreme" barrier between the two.

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It does not from what I have been told and seen... It seems to be horizontal and they don't care about the vertical unless there is an "extreme" barrier between the two.

indeed, because the GPS coordinates on gc.com are 2-dimensional only and have no altitude information.

 

i don't believe the difference between top-of-bridge and bottom-of-ravine qualifies as significant barrier.

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They're everywhere.

 

I don't mind them in some situations, but when there are better places to hide a cache close by, they're annoying.

 

Exactly! I don't mind micros or even nanos. They have their place.

There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

I live downtown and someone managed to hide an ammo can in a tiny park within walking distance of my condo (walking distance is about 5 blocks for me).

It has survived for several years.

 

The question wasn't about micrs or nanos. It was about LPCs. While an interesting micro hide isn't hard to accomplish interesting LPCs are near as hard to find as hens teeth.

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It does not from what I have been told and seen... It seems to be horizontal and they don't care about the vertical unless there is an "extreme" barrier between the two.

indeed, because the GPS coordinates on gc.com are 2-dimensional only and have no altitude information.

 

i don't believe the difference between top-of-bridge and bottom-of-ravine qualifies as significant barrier.

 

I would think a 600 foot drop is significant.

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I would think a 600 foot drop is significant.

well, by itself yeah, but how does a geocacher know which cache they're looking for, when they don't have the description with them? they look at the coords of the one at the bottom and are looking around on the bridge. they find the nano and log the one at the bottom as found, cause they don't know any better.

Edited by dfx
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I would think a 600 foot drop is significant.

well, by itself yeah, but how does a geocacher know which cache they're looking for, when they don't have the description with them? they look at the coords of the one at the bottom and are looking around on the bridge. they find the nano and log the one at the bottom as found, cause they don't know any better.

 

The key is "READ THE DESCRIPTION".

I have never looked for cache without doing so. To do so would be foolish. I do not just hunt whatever caches are loaded blindly into my GPSr...

 

I have even 'shudder' read a hint or two!

 

If they don't know any better then they will soon learn no? :P

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They're everywhere.

 

I don't mind them in some situations, but when there are better places to hide a cache close by, they're annoying.

 

Exactly! I don't mind micros or even nanos. They have their place.

There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

I live downtown and someone managed to hide an ammo can in a tiny park within walking distance of my condo (walking distance is about 5 blocks for me).

It has survived for several years.

 

The question wasn't about micrs or nanos. It was about LPCs. While an interesting micro hide isn't hard to accomplish interesting LPCs are near as hard to find as hens teeth.

 

Sorry. I equate LPCs and a micro in a spruce tree as the same thing.

In my area I find a lot more micros in spruce trees than LPC's...

 

I guess it's regional... :P

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The key is "READ THE DESCRIPTION".

I have never looked for cache without doing so. To do so would be foolish. I do not just hunt whatever caches are loaded blindly into my GPSr...

 

I have even 'shudder' read a hint or two!

 

If they don't know any better then they will soon learn no? :P

maybe you read descriptions and maybe most everybody else does, but there's always the exception to the rule.

 

and there is no learning factor. if i log a cache as found online with "tftc", how would anyone ever know if it was the right one or the wrong one? this kind of ambiguity is what the .1 mile rule wants to avoid.

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I would think a 600 foot drop is significant.

well, by itself yeah, but how does a geocacher know which cache they're looking for, when they don't have the description with them? they look at the coords of the one at the bottom and are looking around on the bridge. they find the nano and log the one at the bottom as found, cause they don't know any better.

 

The key is "READ THE DESCRIPTION".

I have never looked for cache without doing so. To do so would be foolish. I do not just hunt whatever caches are loaded blindly into my GPSr...

 

I have even 'shudder' read a hint or two!

 

If they don't know any better then they will soon learn no? :P

 

It took some of the romance out of the game when this started being necessary. When I first started most areas around here were fun without reading the descriptions. Just load up a bunch of caches and head on out. As time moved on and the number of assorted numbers type caches increased it got to the point that you just have to hand pick each cache before you go. Oh well. Everything changes.

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They're everywhere.

 

I don't mind them in some situations, but when there are better places to hide a cache close by, they're annoying.

 

Exactly! I don't mind micros or even nanos. They have their place.

There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

I live downtown and someone managed to hide an ammo can in a tiny park within walking distance of my condo (walking distance is about 5 blocks for me).

It has survived for several years.

 

The question wasn't about micrs or nanos. It was about LPCs. While an interesting micro hide isn't hard to accomplish interesting LPCs are near as hard to find as hens teeth.

 

Sorry. I equate LPCs and a micro in a spruce tree as the same thing.

In my area I find a lot more micros in spruce trees than LPC's...

 

I guess it's regional... :P

 

I suppose that would depend on where the spruce trees were planted. If they're in the mall parking lot then, not much different.

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I would think a 600 foot drop is significant.

well, by itself yeah, but how does a geocacher know which cache they're looking for, when they don't have the description with them? they look at the coords of the one at the bottom and are looking around on the bridge. they find the nano and log the one at the bottom as found, cause they don't know any better.

 

The key is "READ THE DESCRIPTION".

I have never looked for cache without doing so. To do so would be foolish. I do not just hunt whatever caches are loaded blindly into my GPSr...

 

I have even 'shudder' read a hint or two!

 

If they don't know any better then they will soon learn no? :P

 

It took some of the romance out of the game when this started being necessary. When I first started most areas around here were fun without reading the descriptions. Just load up a bunch of caches and head on out. As time moved on and the number of assorted numbers type caches increased it got to the point that you just have to hand pick each cache before you go. Oh well. Everything changes.

 

You pays your money, you takes your chances....

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They're everywhere.

 

I don't mind them in some situations, but when there are better places to hide a cache close by, they're annoying.

 

Exactly! I don't mind micros or even nanos. They have their place.

There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

I live downtown and someone managed to hide an ammo can in a tiny park within walking distance of my condo (walking distance is about 5 blocks for me).

It has survived for several years.

 

The question wasn't about micrs or nanos. It was about LPCs. While an interesting micro hide isn't hard to accomplish interesting LPCs are near as hard to find as hens teeth.

 

Sorry. I equate LPCs and a micro in a spruce tree as the same thing.

In my area I find a lot more micros in spruce trees than LPC's...

 

I guess it's regional... :P

 

I suppose that would depend on where the spruce trees were planted. If they're in the mall parking lot then, not much different.

 

I live in the great white north... spruce trees everywhere... parking lots... back yard... EVERYWHERE....

 

not so much as planted but there. not removed.

Link to comment

They're everywhere.

 

I don't mind them in some situations, but when there are better places to hide a cache close by, they're annoying.

 

Exactly! I don't mind micros or even nanos. They have their place.

There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

I live downtown and someone managed to hide an ammo can in a tiny park within walking distance of my condo (walking distance is about 5 blocks for me).

It has survived for several years.

 

The question wasn't about micrs or nanos. It was about LPCs. While an interesting micro hide isn't hard to accomplish interesting LPCs are near as hard to find as hens teeth.

 

Sorry. I equate LPCs and a micro in a spruce tree as the same thing.

In my area I find a lot more micros in spruce trees than LPC's...

 

I guess it's regional... :P

 

I suppose that would depend on where the spruce trees were planted. If they're in the mall parking lot then, not much different.

 

I live in the great white north... spruce trees everywhere... parking lots... back yard... EVERYWHERE....

 

not so much as planted but there. not removed.

 

Yeah, you guys never cut those thinks down. Too much soot in the chimney.

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It took some of the romance out of the game when this started being necessary. When I first started most areas around here were fun without reading the descriptions. Just load up a bunch of caches and head on out. As time moved on and the number of assorted numbers type caches increased it got to the point that you just have to hand pick each cache before you go. Oh well. Everything changes.

 

When I first started caching, I hand-picked every cache before heading out, because I had an eXplorist 100 and had to enter coordinates manually. A few GPSrs later, I tend to load up my GPS, and if I feel like caching, I see what's nearby, read the descriptions and decide where to go. I still look somewhat in advance, but I don't do nearly as much planning as I had to in the old days.

 

Sometimes I kind of miss the craziness of following my eXplorist's navigation arrow with no maps whatsoever.

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or are there a lot of geocaches under light post?

 

Funny, some of the best caches I've ever found have been in the vacinity of Vegas... I don't remember ever hunting an LPC there.... I wonnnnder how that happened? :P

 

Oh, I remember. I chose carefully how I would spend my free quality time to cache. :lol:

Edited by Snoogans
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They're everywhere.

 

I don't mind them in some situations, but when there are better places to hide a cache close by, they're annoying.

 

Exactly! I don't mind micros or even nanos. They have their place.

There is a rather large ravine near me that has a very old wooden foot bridge that crosses it. Someone decided to place a nano stuck to the underside of the hand railing rather than hide a regular or larger (easily doable) in the ravine instead.

 

I live downtown and someone managed to hide an ammo can in a tiny park within walking distance of my condo (walking distance is about 5 blocks for me).

It has survived for several years.

 

The question wasn't about micrs or nanos. It was about LPCs. While an interesting micro hide isn't hard to accomplish interesting LPCs are near as hard to find as hens teeth.

 

Sorry. I equate LPCs and a micro in a spruce tree as the same thing.

In my area I find a lot more micros in spruce trees than LPC's...

 

I guess it's regional... :lol:

 

One of these days, I'm going to have to figure out the difference between Spruces and Pines.

 

I agree, regional. Some areas have many more LPC's than others. Like Vegas, I suppose. Or like the Entire State of Florida. :P

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One of these days, I'm going to have to figure out the difference between Spruces and Pines.
Pine needles grow out of the branch in groups of two, three, or five. Spruce and fir needles come out of the branch singly. Spruce needles have a square cross-section, while fir and pine needles are flat.
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The question wasn't about micrs or nanos. It was about LPCs. While an interesting micro hide isn't hard to accomplish interesting LPCs are near as hard to find as hens teeth.

 

In my eyes is an intresting LPC is impossible. The fun of geocaching for me personally is trying to find it, the location it brings me too is just, simply a bonus. I don't care where you put your LPC it can't be fun to find because it is so obvious.

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In my eyes is an intresting LPC is impossible. The fun of geocaching for me personally is trying to find it, the location it brings me too is just, simply a bonus. I don't care where you put your LPC it can't be fun to find because it is so obvious.

 

That's if you use the skirt - THAT is pretty uninteresting. But using the lamppost as a diversion for a different hide is quite common, so watch out, that assumed lampost cache that you rolled up to (and rolled your eyes at) might not be in the skirt cache at all, but a hanger in the tree next to it, or a mag box somewhere higher up on the pole, or a blinkie cunningly painted to look like concrete and inserted into a crevice in the base. Those are the fun ones. We have the second kind in a GREAT location, scenic as all get out, and it's been dnfed! Hiding in plain site seven feet up on the light pole. Wish I could have put a camera on the thing. Geocaching Funniest Home Videos would ensue. :)

 

as for Vegas, the real fun is out in the desert (same as Reno).

 

Camels & Steam Trains

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