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Any military cahers out there?


D0kt0r_D
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You are not the only one .

 

I taught PLGR when it was first introduced in 1996,

 

Now I am retired and have a great time Geocaching

 

22 yrs. in the U.S. Army Reserve (what you would call the militia in Canada). That's the U.S. Army Signal Corps Insignia for my avatar.

 

But why I'm really posting is the PLGR GPS as quoted above. Was that thing huge or what? The Wikipedia article claims it only weighs 3 pounds. Seemed like about 10 to me. That and I trained at CFB Borden 3 times. :P

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The PLGR was just entering service as I was exiting, so I only played with it a few times and it seemed at the time to be voodoo-magic so we relied on map and compass more often than not...

 

And yes, it was one heavy, and clumbsy piece of kit LOL

 

You are not the only one .

 

I taught PLGR when it was first introduced in 1996,

 

Now I am retired and have a great time Geocaching

 

22 yrs. in the U.S. Army Reserve (what you would call the militia in Canada). That's the U.S. Army Signal Corps Insignia for my avatar.

 

But why I'm really posting is the PLGR GPS as quoted above. Was that thing huge or what? The Wikipedia article claims it only weighs 3 pounds. Seemed like about 10 to me. That and I trained at CFB Borden 3 times. :wub:

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Precision Lightweight GPS Receiver PLGR

 

hahahaaa it was light compared to a normal GPSr that we used back then.

 

It was bulky and did not like the cold but it worked great

 

I was an Artillery surveyor for several years and used all types of GPSR, the smallest we used were the old 1 channel Magellans.

 

Then the CF bought the PLGR a godsend for positioning,, with less than 1 -3 meters accuracy

Now they are using smaller receivers and lots of soldiers have their own either Garmin or Magellan,,

 

now they use GPSr in everything from weather balloon telemetry trackers to Artillery guided projectiles,,

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But why I'm really posting is the PLGR GPS as quoted above. Was that thing huge or what? The Wikipedia article claims it only weighs 3 pounds. Seemed like about 10 to me. That and I trained at CFB Borden 3 times. :P

 

Never actually seen one... but it bears a striking resemblance to my Garmin 45xl... size and weight to boot.

 

Glad to hear you liked (and escaped from) Camp Boredom... that was sort of home base for our training when I was in reserve/militia during the 60's and again for when I joined the Cadet Instructors Cadre thru the 70's into the 2000's ( last in 2006). I was RCEME (we fixed things the 'real' engineers and everyone else messed up), later on with the Air Cadets (occasionally other services) taught range and flying theory, survival and navigation amongst other things.

 

Doug

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Precision Lightweight GPS Receiver PLGR

 

hahahaaa it was light compared to a normal GPSr that we used back then.

 

It was bulky and did not like the cold but it worked great

 

I was an Artillery surveyor for several years and used all types of GPSR, the smallest we used were the old 1 channel Magellans.

 

Then the CF bought the PLGR a godsend for positioning,, with less than 1 -3 meters accuracy

Now they are using smaller receivers and lots of soldiers have their own either Garmin or Magellan,,

 

now they use GPSr in everything from weather balloon telemetry trackers to Artillery guided projectiles,,

 

My sister-in-law is 2RCHA. She uses the DAGR and loves it. Says she'll let me use one to cache with next time I visit. :D Apparently it keeps tracking satellites even when turned off for near-instant acquisition when you turn it on. It can also superimpose its map over satellite imagery (ie. this morning's intel pass).

 

BTW, I was in the militia when I went to university.

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But why I'm really posting is the PLGR GPS as quoted above. Was that thing huge or what? The Wikipedia article claims it only weighs 3 pounds. Seemed like about 10 to me. That and I trained at CFB Borden 3 times. :blink:

 

Never actually seen one... but it bears a striking resemblance to my Garmin 45xl... size and weight to boot.

 

Glad to hear you liked (and escaped from) Camp Boredom... that was sort of home base for our training when I was in reserve/militia during the 60's and again for when I joined the Cadet Instructors Cadre thru the 70's into the 2000's ( last in 2006). I was RCEME (we fixed things the 'real' engineers and everyone else messed up), later on with the Air Cadets (occasionally other services) taught range and flying theory, survival and navigation amongst other things.

 

Doug

 

Oh, I only did 3 long weekends. As I said, it was a Militia (or reserves in the U.S.) thing. We trained with the Hamilton Military Police Regiment. There were only like 15 of them, and about 125 of us. :laughing: I do definitely remember the skies being filled all 3 weekends with Cadets being towed around in gliders.

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But why I'm really posting is the PLGR GPS as quoted above. Was that thing huge or what? The Wikipedia article claims it only weighs 3 pounds. Seemed like about 10 to me. That and I trained at CFB Borden 3 times. ;)

 

Never actually seen one... but it bears a striking resemblance to my Garmin 45xl... size and weight to boot.

 

Glad to hear you liked (and escaped from) Camp Boredom... that was sort of home base for our training when I was in reserve/militia during the 60's and again for when I joined the Cadet Instructors Cadre thru the 70's into the 2000's ( last in 2006). I was RCEME (we fixed things the 'real' engineers and everyone else messed up), later on with the Air Cadets (occasionally other services) taught range and flying theory, survival and navigation amongst other things.

 

Doug

 

Oh, I only did 3 long weekends. As I said, it was a Militia (or reserves in the U.S.) thing. We trained with the Hamilton Military Police Regiment. There were only like 15 of them, and about 125 of us. :laughing: I do definitely remember the skies being filled all 3 weekends with Cadets being towed around in gliders.

 

I lived in Borden for 5 years. But that was when I was a kid. :blink:

There was precious little for a kid to do there in the 70s. Can't imagine what it must have been like as an adult!

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But why I'm really posting is the PLGR GPS as quoted above. Was that thing huge or what? The Wikipedia article claims it only weighs 3 pounds. Seemed like about 10 to me. That and I trained at CFB Borden 3 times. :D

 

Never actually seen one... but it bears a striking resemblance to my Garmin 45xl... size and weight to boot.

 

Glad to hear you liked (and escaped from) Camp Boredom... that was sort of home base for our training when I was in reserve/militia during the 60's and again for when I joined the Cadet Instructors Cadre thru the 70's into the 2000's ( last in 2006). I was RCEME (we fixed things the 'real' engineers and everyone else messed up), later on with the Air Cadets (occasionally other services) taught range and flying theory, survival and navigation amongst other things.

 

Doug

 

Oh, I only did 3 long weekends. As I said, it was a Militia (or reserves in the U.S.) thing. We trained with the Hamilton Military Police Regiment. There were only like 15 of them, and about 125 of us. :lol: I do definitely remember the skies being filled all 3 weekends with Cadets being towed around in gliders.

 

I lived in Borden for 5 years. But that was when I was a kid. ;)

There was precious little for a kid to do there in the 70s. Can't imagine what it must have been like as an adult!

 

I recall the Rod and Gun Club fondly... Spent a lot of time there when I wasn't too busy studying at the CFMS School.

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Ex 81A Security and Military Police officer here.. (braces for the flood of meathead jokes)

When they found out I could spell computer, they put me into IT security right away and I spend the rest of my days at NDHQ.

I work for Bell as an network security consulting analyst now. Having fun now caching with the kids in Ottawa, where there's a plethora of caches to be found.

Tyg

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