Jump to content

What is "In the top of the NE abutment of bridge #"?


Weather Wimps
Followers 0

Recommended Posts

OK, thought I would try my first benchmark. Plugged in the coordinates, drove to near the location, was pleased there was a bike path, took it to within 20 feet of the mark, which was next to a newish looking automobile bridge surrounded by 5 feet tall weeds/grass/etc.

 

THEN I read the description again and noted that it said the marker is in the top of the NE abutment of the bridge. What in the heck is an abutment?? I didn't go pounding in the weeds as I didn't know what this meant.

 

Is it on top of the bridge where the traffic goes, or is it underneath? And what are the chances of the marker being there if this thing was last found in 1934 and the bridge is modern?

 

Thanks,

 

Bob

 

Cache Long and Prosper

Link to comment

The abutment(sp?) is where the bridge starts/ends. It is where the roadway leaves the ground and goes onto the bridge. It is usually a substantial concrete wall. I found two markers within the last week that were on abutments.

 

And if I'm wrong, I'm sure survey tech will correct me soon enough.

 

rdw

 

Abutment --          |          |          V---------------------------------------------##########       |       |       /#####################      |       |      /#######################     |       |     /#########################    |       |    /###########################~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~/##############
Link to comment

a·but·ment Pronunciation Key (-btmnt)

n.

The act or process of abutting.

 

Something that abuts.

The point of contact of two abutting objects or parts.

 

The part of a structure that bears the weight or pressure of an arch.

---> A structure that supports the end of a bridge.

A structure that anchors the cables of a suspension bridge.

Link to comment

Ok, so if the abutment is the part that takes the weight of the bridge - I understand this part - then how could a benchmark be on the TOP of an abutment? Wouldn't the road be on top of it?? Don't recall the mark I was looking for when I saw 'mark in top of NE abutment', but I do remember not finding it since I was looking at the wing walls of the bridge. Hmmm.

 

Juanbob icon_confused.gif

Link to comment

Ok, so if the abutment is the part that takes the weight of the bridge - I understand this part - then how could a benchmark be on the TOP of an abutment? Wouldn't the road be on top of it?? Don't recall the mark I was looking for when I saw 'mark in top of NE abutment', but I do remember not finding it since I was looking at the wing walls of the bridge. Hmmm.

 

Juanbob icon_confused.gif

Link to comment

Thanks for all the replies!! And the nice drawing. :-)

 

Those weeds were quite a bit taller than 5 ft too (well over my head). Anyway, I looked under the bridge, up where the road/pillars first leave the hill, along the ground/rocks there, even climbed under the bridge and tried to look up. Next went on top along the side of the bike path/sidewalk.

 

No luck. :-( I have a feeling that they widened the bridge and added the sidewalks on both sides since 1934 ;-) and in doing so possible destroyed the marker??

 

At least I know what the underside of a bridge looks like now. If anyone has any other suggestions I will try again, but I am probably going to write this one off.

 

Bob

 

Cache Long and Prosper

Link to comment

I was out and about on Labor Day and found this benchmark, HR0917, on a bridge abutment. I took a few pics. Take a look at them along with TeacherMatt's pics.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/mark/details.asp?PID=HR0917

 

It is not uncommon to put benchmarks in bridge abutments, sometimes called the deck or headwall, as they are usually built VERY well - thick, heavy, and deep into the ground - and therefore less susceptable to motion.

 

Keep on Caching!

- Kewaneh

Link to comment

Things that can happen to 'abutment' disks:

 

1) The bridge gets 'modernized' and the abutments are extended vertically to support the addition of quardrails. The disk gets covered in concrete.

 

2) The bridge is replaced and widened and the disk ends up being covered by the new bridge.

 

3) A series of bridges over a set of local tracks were raised to allow car carriers to pass underneath. Again, the abutments had to be extended vertically and most of the disks were covered. One disk was far enough out on the abutment to survive, and I found another in the LOWER end of the abutment.

 

WR

 

"Why worry when you can obsess?"

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 0
×
×
  • Create New...