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New 'Caches in a Day' Record Imminent?


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:) Been reading along with this thread with little comment, but I have to say, whether or not you like power trails or hate them, I am impressed with the amount of effort that had to go into a thing like this. Just the containers and the logs would be a pretty good project. Not to mention placing them and taking coords, the web listing pages they had to write. Even coming up with 500 names like this would be a pretty good chore.

 

This is a magnificent feat!!

 

My hat is off to the people behind this project. Like it or not, I am in awe!! ;)

Edited by NeecesandNephews
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A-yup just goes to show how cache barren the area is.

The power line road is at least 7 miles away from I15 so I don't believe it's going to bother anyone doing a route through there, I know if it was me Id do a Barstow to Vegas and have it set for 1/2 mile to the side, also remember high ground clearance vehicles are recommended.

It's not something the average cacher is going to do. also a little over 4000 ft elevation change ;)

It passes through some areas where a terrain 3-4.5 can easilly be placed very nearby for those who want the extra challenges.

Yes and there is room for them also

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Yes and there is room for them also

That's what I meant...anyone who wants to will not be prevented from hiding all the kinds of Caches they also like in the same area, unless the kind they like to hide require them to be far away from others, or the first one in an area. I can see some reservations against pewer trails, but it really doesn't hurt anything in this area. It's a well done example of something that wouldn't work just anywhere.

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I see a bicycling cache trip as the best way to go on this trail. A motor vehicle (aside from a golf cart) would be a pain in the neck.

I think the terrain will rule out the golf cart...should we meet there next winter for an ATV weekend?? Hey, maybe there can be a Mega Event in Primm!!

Yeah, I haven't looked at the terrain closely but suspect it's too rough for a golf cart too. Might even need a couple tanks of fuel for the ATVs but if there was a way to swing it, I'd do it. Winter though because I remember the 115 average daytime temps down there. I don't want to be riding an ATV in short stops in 115.

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Yeah, I haven't looked at the terrain closely but suspect it's too rough for a golf cart too. Might even need a couple tanks of fuel for the ATVs but if there was a way to swing it, I'd do it. Winter though because I remember the 115 average daytime temps down there. I don't want to be riding an ATV in short stops in 115.

We'll have to work on this!!

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For those that haven't yet checked, the Google Street View pictures are available along the highway if you want a good idea of the terrain. Of course, Street View doesn't mention the heat....

 

Best time is now or in October/November. Too late in the year and your days get very short.

 

Oh, night is no problem. around 80% of my finds have been done at night. Night might be better to avoid rattlesnakes but cougars and such might be a problem.

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For those that haven't yet checked, the Google Street View pictures are available along the highway if you want a good idea of the terrain. Of course, Street View doesn't mention the heat....

 

Best time is now or in October/November. Too late in the year and your days get very short.

 

Oh, night is no problem. around 80% of my finds have been done at night. Night might be better to avoid rattlesnakes but cougars and such might be a problem.

Shouldn't be any cougars there, buy coyotes might. In fact, the rattlers might be just as busy at night since it's too hot in the day. That might be a cool trip during a full moon.

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Oh, night is no problem. around 80% of my finds have been done at night. Night might be better to avoid rattlesnakes but cougars and such might be a problem.

Shouldn't be any cougars there, buy coyotes might. In fact, the rattlers might be just as busy at night since it's too hot in the day. That might be a cool trip during a full moon.

Well, in October or later the rattlers shouldn't be out much at all. Also, the desert can get VERY cold at night. Rattlers would rather hunt when it's warm than when it's cold.

and that highway is on s less rugged path than the powerline

I used to ride my ATCs on a powerline road. It's perfect for ATVs. In fact I would bet good money that they used ATVs to make the trail.

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I would say ignore them, but how do you run a PQ to do that, or how long would it take to put each one on ignore? Spending one minute per page is an 8+ hour task. ;)

Do you plan to be caching in the open desert 40-some miles west of Vegas? Ever?

 

If not then ignoring these isn't even an issue for the vast majority of you. ;)

Sure you can... at least if you use Pocket Queries and GSAK. Set a filter to owner="NGA" and poof! they're gone.

 

OK so you live in or are visiting the area. You run a PQ of the 500 nearest caches. 490 are the NGA caches. Filter them in GSAK and that doesn't leave you a heck of a lot of caches. That is assuming you have the technical know how to use GSAK. It's an app with steep learning curve for the technologically challenged.

A-yup. I've thought for years that Pocket Queries should have a "Cache Owner is/is not" selection.

A-yup just goes to show how cache barren the area is.

The power line road is at least 7 miles away from I15 so I don't believe it's going to bother anyone doing a route through there, I know if it was me Id do a Barstow to Vegas and have it set for 1/2 mile to the side, also remember high ground clearance vehicles are recommended.

It's not something the average cacher is going to do. also a little over 4000 ft elevation change :)

 

Well if it's way out in the desert, it doesn't seem that bad. Just a bit of a cheesy way to boost numbers. Do the numbers really mean that much to spend a few days in the desert to repetitiously do the same thing over and over.. If you log the finds a month later nobody will even notice if you really found them. :mad:

 

I was flipping through the tv channels and there was a show where this big burly guy with tattoos and a goatee was getting calf implants.. Calf implants I don't know, it seems similar, I just don't understand what the absurd showing off is about. :mad:

 

100 finds in 2000 meant you were a pro, by 2004 it was 1000. Now it is 7500 or so. They keep publishing tons of easy hides and it really devaluates the value of the numbers anyhow. Like if they just printed up an unlimited amount of cash. :wub: The more powertrails there are to boost the numbers, the less the numbers mean...

 

I have several thousand finds and a few hundred hides, but since they are spread out over a half dozen accounts, it really doesn't matter... :wub:

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Well, in October or later the rattlers shouldn't be out much at all. Also, the desert can get VERY cold at night. Rattlers would rather hunt when it's warm than when it's cold.

 

If I remember right, this area can still be 80-90 degrees at night, even in Mid to Late October. I'll look into it.

 

Tonight it's supposed to get to 44 in Palm Springs if that's any indicator...

 

I haven't been in the Cal desert area in a bunch of years. It might have changed with global warming and all...

 

;)

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I see a bicycling cache trip as the best way to go on this trail. A motor vehicle (aside from a golf cart) would be a pain in the neck.

 

bittsen- I'm back in PDX pretty soon. Anytime after Memorial Day let me know, I'll travel with you to hit all these caches. We can hit up Vegas afterward as a reward.

If your serious think about the temps during the summer

and a soft top jeep with the doors off would be about the perfect vehicle ;)

Yeah, or maybe motorcycle and LOTs of sunscreen.

 

At first I thought it was doable on a bicycle...not so much now.

 

Mountain Bike, now would be the perfect time.

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I see a bicycling cache trip as the best way to go on this trail. A motor vehicle (aside from a golf cart) would be a pain in the neck.

 

bittsen- I'm back in PDX pretty soon. Anytime after Memorial Day let me know, I'll travel with you to hit all these caches. We can hit up Vegas afterward as a reward.

If your serious think about the temps during the summer

and a soft top jeep with the doors off would be about the perfect vehicle ;)

Yeah, or maybe motorcycle and LOTs of sunscreen.

 

At first I thought it was doable on a bicycle...not so much now.

 

Mountain Bike, now would be the perfect time.

If I were still younger than 20....

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Looks painful to me :) I did a series of 29 once along a highway and that was enough to give my caching buddy and I both huge headaches ;) It might be different if it's a very quiet rural highway but cars zooming by while I cache is not my idea of fun.

 

I did some of that trail. My cousin lives right next to it so I walked it. I can't imagine trying to drive it. Either way, I started with #1 and by the time I got to #8 I was losing interest. Pushed on, but by #13 I was done and thought the heck with the rest.

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I have to agree with you, TWU. It is one of the oddest unspoken turnarounds that I have seen here. First, even the term Power Trail was unheard of. Then suddenly, without warning, clusters of caches began to be turned down because they were deemed to be Power Trails. For a while there, questions were buzzing about what exactly constituted a "Power Trail", but it was defined, and the questions settled down.

 

Then all of a sudden, again, with no notice, not only were they being allowed again, but it almost seems that they are being encouraged! HUGE power trails.

 

I really don't care one way or the other, but consistency and communication, and advance notice of these decisions, where possible, would sure be very much appreciated.

That, to me, is the biggest issue here. Try to place a new cache 500' or less from an existing physical and it won't get published because it violates the guidelines.

 

Although some may come up with all sorts of interpretations of "don't hide a cache every 600 feet just because you can" I fail see how this series and others like it do not violate the spirit of what this guideline is all about.

I suspect that the reason that you believe that these caches violate some guideilne is because you have misread the guidelines. They simply do not say what you are presenting them as saying. You state that the guidelines say 'don't hide a cache every 600 feet just because you can' when in fact the actual verbiage is 'Please don't hide a cache every 600 feet just because you can'. The simple addition of 'please' to that sentence makes it a request, not a requirement.

 

What is a geocaching newbie to think when some guidelines are strictly enforced while others seem to be ignored?

No guideline is being ignored. The recent change merely takes the reviewers off the hook in determining when a power trail exists. Similar to the old 'wow' requirement, this was difficult to manage and created undue angst. The moment that you require the reviewers to approve based on the 'spirit' of the guidelines rather than the actual written document, you are asking for an angst sandwich. With the change, TPTB merely has to deal with 'problem' areas that are reported to them or cache submissions that violate requests made by landowners.

 

Further, it should be noted that even if there were a guideline which stated that power trails were verboten, they still would be allowed with prior approval, just like every other geocache that is seemingly against the guidelines. (That's actually why they are called guidelines.)

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Well, in October or later the rattlers shouldn't be out much at all. Also, the desert can get VERY cold at night. Rattlers would rather hunt when it's warm than when it's cold.

If I remember right, this area can still be 80-90 degrees at night, even in Mid to Late October. I'll look into it.
Even though the optimum temperature for rattlesnakes is around 77oto 89o F (25o to 32o C), the greatest period of activity is spring, when they come out of hibernation and are seeking food.
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Stories? Answers to questions?

 

We used the names of ancient gods because it is the first/best list we found with an abundance of names. We hate numbers, so we avoided names like "Stamina Test #042" or whatever.

 

We stopped where we did because the "low fuel" buzzer/light came on and the nearest gas station was 25 road miles away. Not worth the risk.

 

We drove to Baker for fuel and food. Instead of continuing the run, we decided to place caches near the interstate. - thus the Road to the White house was born. It started raining w/sleet so we stopped and drove to Primm and placed the Trail of Fears (Phobias)

 

There are no plans to continue this trail, but there are gaps and we suspect that we may have forgot to hit the Mark Waypoint button.

 

We averaged one placement every 55 seconds.

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:) Been reading along with this thread with little comment, but I have to say, whether or not you like power trails or hate them, I am impressed with the amount of effort that had to go into a thing like this. Just the containers and the logs would be a pretty good project. Not to mention placing them and taking coords, the web listing pages they had to write. Even coming up with 500 names like this would be a pretty good chore.

 

This is a magnificent feat!!

 

My hat is off to the people behind this project. Like it or not, I am in awe!! ;)

 

I have to admit that I'm a little impressed too. I'm going to be even more impressed when all of these are still collecting logs in a year and exponentially impressed every year after that.

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We averaged one placement every 55 seconds.

Ahh, so you actually gave some thought to hiding them ;) Sorry... that was unavoidable.

 

How long did it take to get so many containers together? We are assuming that these are film cannisters... is that correct?

I wouldn't have said it so snarky but I did think it.

With 55 seconds per hide, and cloud cover (they said it was sleeting later), I'm sure the coordinates are flaky, at best.

I have to assume these are just toss downs and not hid under rocks or anything so they might just mighrate with each rainfall.

 

Assumptions, of course, until told otherwise.

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We averaged one placement every 55 seconds.

Ahh, so you actually gave some thought to hiding them ;) Sorry... that was unavoidable.

 

How long did it take to get so many containers together? We are assuming that these are film cannisters... is that correct?

I wouldn't have said it so snarky but I did think it.

With 55 seconds per hide, and cloud cover (they said it was sleeting later), I'm sure the coordinates are flaky, at best.

I have to assume these are just toss downs and not hid under rocks or anything so they might just mighrate with each rainfall.

 

Assumptions, of course, until told otherwise.

I have read your assumptions before, and as expected, need to be corrected.

 

The drive time was about 40-45 seconds. The GPS had 5-10 seconds to stabalize. Clouds do not effect GPS reception, metal and body position do. We compensated for that and test are showing we are very accurate.

 

If you zoom in on sat pics, it was not a straight line. This would explain the extremely poor gas mileage. Sometimes we had to double back a half mile to get the proper road.

 

Film canisters represent less than 5% of the hides. There are some regular/large containers that require a significant climb. Keep an eye on terrain ratings, they will help you know what is coming up.

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We averaged one placement every 55 seconds.

Ahh, so you actually gave some thought to hiding them ;) Sorry... that was unavoidable.

 

How long did it take to get so many containers together? We are assuming that these are film cannisters... is that correct?

I wouldn't have said it so snarky but I did think it.

With 55 seconds per hide, and cloud cover (they said it was sleeting later), I'm sure the coordinates are flaky, at best.

I have to assume these are just toss downs and not hid under rocks or anything so they might just mighrate with each rainfall.

 

Assumptions, of course, until told otherwise.

I didn't think I said it "snarky" at all. But anyway... I'm over it already. :)

 

GPS experts say that cloud cover has absolutely no bearing on GPS accuracy, BTW.

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We averaged one placement every 55 seconds.

Ahh, so you actually gave some thought to hiding them ;) Sorry... that was unavoidable.

 

How long did it take to get so many containers together? We are assuming that these are film cannisters... is that correct?

I wouldn't have said it so snarky but I did think it.

With 55 seconds per hide, and cloud cover (they said it was sleeting later), I'm sure the coordinates are flaky, at best.

I have to assume these are just toss downs and not hid under rocks or anything so they might just mighrate with each rainfall.

 

Assumptions, of course, until told otherwise.

I didn't think I said it "snarky" at all. But anyway... I'm over it already. :)

 

GPS experts say that cloud cover has absolutely no bearing on GPS accuracy, BTW.

We didn't think it was snarky either.

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First, I think you may have created one of more interesting power trails I've seen . I suspect that you were trying to create a record that won't be broken but the fact that they're all along a $WD road int the desert is certainly unique.

 

I do have one question though. What's with the first log on most of them from someone that claimed to be one of the hiders? Is it a common practice out that way to log finds on your own caches? Personally, I'd be embarrassed to claim 600 something finds on caches that I hid myself.

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GPS experts say that cloud cover has absolutely no bearing on GPS accuracy, BTW.

 

Yeah, I know what the experts say.

I also know what I have experienced.

 

So let's just not even get into that debate.

 

I still think that 5-10 seconds for a GPS to "stabilize" isn't even close to enough time. But, hey, what do I know.

You shouldn't leave yourself open like that.

 

Like I said, the coordinates have tested accurate so far, clouds and all. Maybe your inaccuracy isn't from the clouds? Maybe try a different technique?

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First, I think you may have created one of more interesting power trails I've seen . I suspect that you were trying to create a record that won't be broken but the fact that they're all along a $WD road int the desert is certainly unique.

 

I do have one question though. What's with the first log on most of them from someone that claimed to be one of the hiders? Is it a common practice out that way to log finds on your own caches? Personally, I'd be embarrassed to claim 600 something finds on caches that I hid myself.

I believe that is common practice in most places, but not with all people. Currently the only way to get a cache to show up in stats is to either find it or be the hider. When Groundspeak creates a method of having multiple hiders then I am sure it will change, but that is a different time and a different topic.

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NGA

Seems like a difficult task to prep and set out all those caches - let alone in such a short time.

 

Your description states words to the effect of: High clearance and 4WD. Does that only apply to some areas of the trail or are they needed througout? I've driven on some of those "roads" in that area and they seem to be a mix of rough terrain, sand, or dry stream beds. Do all of these apply?

 

Thanks

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First, I think you may have created one of more interesting power trails I've seen . I suspect that you were trying to create a record that won't be broken but the fact that they're all along a $WD road int the desert is certainly unique.

 

I do have one question though. What's with the first log on most of them from someone that claimed to be one of the hiders? Is it a common practice out that way to log finds on your own caches? Personally, I'd be embarrassed to claim 600 something finds on caches that I hid myself.

I believe that is common practice in most places, but not with all people. Currently the only way to get a cache to show up in stats is to either find it or be the hider. When Groundspeak creates a method of having multiple hiders then I am sure it will change, but that is a different time and a different topic.

 

I don't think the practice of logging a find on your own cache is that common. Whenever the topic comes up in the forum the response which suggest that it shouldn't be done are mostly something like "If that's how want to play the game, there's nothing stopping you from doing so."

 

I understand that the site doesn't provide a mechanism of associating a hide with multiple accounts, and I don't know how many hiders were involved, but one way to deal with it would be to split up the hides among those that were involved, and because the site allows you to put any string you want in the "Who Placed The Cache" box they all could have used "NGA". Assuming that there were three hiders involved, each would then be credited with 200 something hides.

 

As far as getting the caches to show up in stats, statistics are pretty meaningless unless everyone is playing the game according to the same guidelines.

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First, I think you may have created one of more interesting power trails I've seen . I suspect that you were trying to create a record that won't be broken but the fact that they're all along a $WD road int the desert is certainly unique.

 

I do have one question though. What's with the first log on most of them from someone that claimed to be one of the hiders? Is it a common practice out that way to log finds on your own caches? Personally, I'd be embarrassed to claim 600 something finds on caches that I hid myself.

I believe that is common practice in most places, but not with all people. Currently the only way to get a cache to show up in stats is to either find it or be the hider. When Groundspeak creates a method of having multiple hiders then I am sure it will change, but that is a different time and a different topic.

 

I don't think the practice of logging a find on your own cache is that common. Whenever the topic comes up in the forum the response which suggest that it shouldn't be done are mostly something like "If that's how want to play the game, there's nothing stopping you from doing so."

 

I understand that the site doesn't provide a mechanism of associating a hide with multiple accounts, and I don't know how many hiders were involved, but one way to deal with it would be to split up the hides among those that were involved, and because the site allows you to put any string you want in the "Who Placed The Cache" box they all could have used "NGA". Assuming that there were three hiders involved, each would then be credited with 200 something hides.

 

As far as getting the caches to show up in stats, statistics are pretty meaningless unless everyone is playing the game according to the same guidelines.

When you click on the person that has their name up their it brings up one profile. According to this website, that is "THE" cache owner. That is the hider. Nobody else has a profile pop up, just one hider. One profile. That is a rule. If that person logs a find, then I will recognize your point.

 

It is extremely common that people that were present during the hide to log that cache as a find.

 

Sorry if I sound a bit rough but you asked one question and applied the answer elsewhere. Very deceiving and I take offense to that. The hider is the person that owns th cache. Co-hiders are present when the hider places the cache. Don't ask about co-hiders then apply the answer as if they owned the cache. Please understand the difference.

 

Also, be careful of the forums. These represent 1% of the community and many are here just to hear themselves talk. What you hear may or may apply to the situation at hand. Please learn the difference.

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NGA

Seems like a difficult task to prep and set out all those caches - let alone in such a short time.

 

Your description states words to the effect of: High clearance and 4WD. Does that only apply to some areas of the trail or are they needed througout? I've driven on some of those "roads" in that area and they seem to be a mix of rough terrain, sand, or dry stream beds. Do all of these apply?

 

Thanks

There was a lot of prep and planning. Even the warnings had a lot of thought. Warn too much and it all gets ignored, warn too little and folks get themselves into trouble.

 

You can do this road in a minivan if you drive real slow and walk to 15-20% of the caches. I guess you can ignore them, you don't have to get them all. There are no boulders or major washouts on the main road. The side roads can get a bit rough. If you have an SUV, you could do 45 on the long stretches. 80% of the main road is pretty smooth, but when you that one small washout, you will shake up your suspension. The paved road will also sneak up on you so watch for cross traffic.

 

Long story short, the road is pretty darned good for a dirt road. Just be carfeful of the rough spots.

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When you click on the person that has their name up their it brings up one profile. According to this website, that is "THE" cache owner. That is the hider. Nobody else has a profile pop up, just one hider. One profile. That is a rule. If that person logs a find, then I will recognize your point.

 

It is extremely common that people that were present during the hide to log that cache as a find.

 

Sorry if I sound a bit rough but you asked one question and applied the answer elsewhere. Very deceiving and I take offense to that. The hider is the person that owns th cache. Co-hiders are present when the hider places the cache. Don't ask about co-hiders then apply the answer as if they owned the cache. Please understand the difference.

 

Also, be careful of the forums. These represent 1% of the community and many are here just to hear themselves talk. What you hear may or may apply to the situation at hand. Please learn the difference.

 

It's very easy to set email up so that everyone in a group gets an Email whenever someone logs a note on the cache. There's no valid reason for a cache owner to log a find on it.

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When you click on the person that has their name up their it brings up one profile. According to this website, that is "THE" cache owner. That is the hider. Nobody else has a profile pop up, just one hider. One profile. That is a rule. If that person logs a find, then I will recognize your point.

 

It is extremely common that people that were present during the hide to log that cache as a find.

 

Sorry if I sound a bit rough but you asked one question and applied the answer elsewhere. Very deceiving and I take offense to that. The hider is the person that owns th cache. Co-hiders are present when the hider places the cache. Don't ask about co-hiders then apply the answer as if they owned the cache. Please understand the difference.

 

Also, be careful of the forums. These represent 1% of the community and many are here just to hear themselves talk. What you hear may or may apply to the situation at hand. Please learn the difference.

 

It's very easy to set email up so that everyone in a group gets an Email whenever someone logs a note on the cache. There's no valid reason for a cache owner to log a find on it.

The cache owner is not logging a find.

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NGA

Seems like a difficult task to prep and set out all those caches - let alone in such a short time.

 

Your description states words to the effect of: High clearance and 4WD. Does that only apply to some areas of the trail or are they needed througout? I've driven on some of those "roads" in that area and they seem to be a mix of rough terrain, sand, or dry stream beds. Do all of these apply?

 

Thanks

There was a lot of prep and planning. Even the warnings had a lot of thought. Warn too much and it all gets ignored, warn too little and folks get themselves into trouble.

 

You can do this road in a minivan if you drive real slow and walk to 15-20% of the caches. I guess you can ignore them, you don't have to get them all. There are no boulders or major washouts on the main road. The side roads can get a bit rough. If you have an SUV, you could do 45 on the long stretches. 80% of the main road is pretty smooth, but when you that one small washout, you will shake up your suspension. The paved road will also sneak up on you so watch for cross traffic.

 

Long story short, the road is pretty darned good for a dirt road. Just be carfeful of the rough spots.

Thank you,

 

That is a beautiful, quiet area. I plan to pick up a few in the near future.

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It is extremely common that people that were present during the hide to log that cache as a find.

 

Hey, I am pretty new here, and was really impressed with your accomplishment, but that is just lame!!! ;)

Interesting.. I would estimate that 99.9% of the cachers I have talked to do this. The ones that I know that do not I can count on one hand. And I know a lot of cachers.

 

Is this practice more regional than I thought? Or is it just a forum frequenter thing?

 

Edit to add:

As far as the "Lame" comment, I will discount that. In some cultures it is OK for it's citizens to run around naked, but around here we call it indecent exposure. Different cultures are just different. I will do some surveys on some local boards and see how they respond.

Edited by NGA
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It is extremely common that people that were present during the hide to log that cache as a find.

 

Hey, I am pretty new here, and was really impressed with your accomplishment, but that is just lame!!! ;)

Interesting.. I would estimate that 99.9% of the cachers I have talked to do this. The ones that I know that do not I can count on one hand. And I know a lot of cachers.

 

Is this practice more regional than I thought? Or is it just a forum frequenter thing?

 

 

That I really can't answer. As far as it being a "forum frequenter" thing, I won't be offended by you saying that, if you wont be offended by my saying I think for myself, and the opinion I expressed, is just that, an opinion. If it makes you feel better to categorize it as a strictly "forum" opinion, I guess your entitled. :)

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That I really can't answer. As far as it being a "forum frequenter" thing, I won't be offended by you saying that, if you wont be offended by my saying I think for myself, and the opinion I expressed, is just that, an opinion. If it makes you feel better to categorize it as a strictly "forum" opinion, I guess your entitled. ;)

 

I have been geocaching for 6 years. My direct observation is that the real world is quite different that what you read in the forums. For one, most of us don't argue with each other over petty stuff.

 

Edit to add: I wasn't calling you a forum frequenter, sorry if it came out that way. I was only referring to the vocal minority that spends countless hours here. Some have their head on pretty good, others still need adjusted.

Edited by NGA
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Interesting.. I would estimate that 99.9% of the cachers I have talked to do this. The ones that I know that do not I can count on one hand. And I know a lot of cachers.

 

Is this practice more regional than I thought? Or is it just a forum frequenter thing?

It might be regional. In New York I've co-hidden caches that are owned by other accounts, and decline to log them as finds. I've also done the reverse, and AFAIK the co-hiders have declined to log them as finds either.

 

My co-hides are perpetually my 'closest unfound' caches. I add them to my watchlist so that I can get emails along with the technical owner, and can help keep an eye on maintenance issues.

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It is extremely common that people that were present during the hide to log that cache as a find.

 

Hey, I am pretty new here, and was really impressed with your accomplishment, but that is just lame!!! ;)

It's actually fairly common. If you're out with a group and one person hides a Cache, it's not at all uncommon for the others in the group to log a find. I'm not saying whether it's lame or not, just that it's done a lot, all over.

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It is extremely common that people that were present during the hide to log that cache as a find.

 

Hey, I am pretty new here, and was really impressed with your accomplishment, but that is just lame!!! ;)

 

If you mean it's lame for someone to log a find when they were there when the cache was placed (essentially helping the cache to be placed) whether they own the cache or not, I would agree.

 

And that is what I meant when I said "owners". I should have said "placers", I guess.

 

As for the comment that "It is extremely common that people that were present during the hide to log that cache as a find.", I find that it is "extremely common" as surprising.

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