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Special Equipment?


Don_J

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So, after reading these forums for awhile, it becomes clear that T1 is "accessible", and T5 is "Special equipment".

 

My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I placed a cache today that I am certain that 95% of the local hikers could not reach without an adjustable hiking stick. If they did, they would not be able to make it safely down. (Toz will leave his stick in the car, just to spite me) :laughing:

 

Seriously, if I had not had my stick, the hot topic this week would have been about Ventura County's, (CA) effort to retrieve a geocacher's body.

 

I plan on rating this cache as a T5, but I'm wondering if I'm stepping into sacred grounds here. After all, no kayaks, scuba, ropes, etc., are required. Just a three foot stick to get you up and an eight foot stick to get you down.

 

I plan on putting that it is REQUIRED, not suggested, in my cache description.

 

Don

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

 

I've found caches that required a screwdriver to open

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

 

I've found caches that required a screwdriver to open

 

All I have to say is ..... WHY!?

 

I suppose I need to get a broom handle to add to my normal caching tools.

~LOL~

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

 

I've found caches that required a screwdriver to open

 

All I have to say is ..... WHY!?

 

I suppose I need to get a broom handle to add to my normal caching tools.

~LOL~

 

I wouldn't call a broom special equipment unless it is for transportation purposes.

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You don't really explain the conditions, so it's tough for others to "see" where your thoughts are.

 

We have quite a few very steep terrain mountain area caches with slag, scree, wash-out, or solid rock.

90 % of cachers wouldn't hit them, as well as maybe 50% of hikers (most here stay on trail) - stick or not.

Most are rated 3.5-4.5 .

All are able to be accessed up/down with a normal hiking stick , though most folks around here don't use 'em.

On glacial (huuuuge) boulder ridges, at least around here, a stick is often in the way and usually gets put in the pack.

 

Even after removing the occassional rattler from a narrow pass, or poking in the hole for critters, I can't convince the majority here that a stick's a good idea.

 

Maybe a typo, couldn't find a "hiking" stick that expanded to eight feet. Why would 8' be needed ?

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

Screwdrivers????????????

You need to make sure those electrical boxes are real, don't you?
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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

 

I've found caches that required a screwdriver to open

 

All I have to say is ..... WHY!?

 

I suppose I need to get a broom handle to add to my normal caching tools.

~LOL~

 

In the instances I'm thinking of, the CO used a pipe as a container with a rubber cap as a lid. A hose clamp was used to seal the cap. You needed a screwdriver to loosen the hose clamp to get the lid off.

 

One CO in my area who uses this method ties a screwdriver to the container, but I've also found caches like this without the screwdriver attached.

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I've found caches that required a screwdriver to open

 

All I have to say is ..... WHY!?

 

I suppose I need to get a broom handle to add to my normal caching tools.

~LOL~

 

In the instances I'm thinking of, the CO used a pipe as a container with a rubber cap as a lid. A hose clamp was used to seal the cap. You needed a screwdriver to loosen the hose clamp to get the lid off.

 

One CO in my area who uses this method ties a screwdriver to the container, but I've also found caches like this without the screwdriver attached.

 

I thought about the rubber access plug on a pipe cache but thought

1) it's cost prohibitive vs the cost of an ammo can

2) I wouldn't expect people to carry a screwdriver with them to open it

3) It would resemble a pipe bomb

 

But I see your point.

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

 

Sometimes you need to stop, sit and have a drink before finding the cache.

Link to comment
My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

 

Sometimes you need to stop, sit and have a drink before finding the cache.

 

Oh great.... now I am gonna have to bring a tumbler and jigger with me next time....

Link to comment
My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

 

Sometimes you need to stop, sit and have a drink before finding the cache.

 

Oh great.... now I am gonna have to bring a tumbler and jigger with me next time....

Nah. Just mix 'em up bulk in a big thermos before you leave the house.

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

Screwdrivers????????????

 

Sometimes you need to stop, sit and have a drink before finding the cache.

LMAO

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So, after reading these forums for awhile, it becomes clear that T1 is "accessible", and T5 is "Special equipment".

 

My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

I don't think so!

 

For me T5 equipment means stuff that you need to get yourself to a certain location. i.e. climbing or scuba-diving equipment, a boat, submarine or spacecraft. But not a car, so Highway parking lot caches are not T5.

 

GermanSailor

Edited by GermanSailor
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So, after reading these forums for awhile, it becomes clear that T1 is "accessible", and T5 is "Special equipment".

 

My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I placed a cache today that I am certain that 95% of the local hikers could not reach without an adjustable hiking stick. If they did, they would not be able to make it safely down. (Toz will leave his stick in the car, just to spite me) :D

 

Seriously, if I had not had my stick, the hot topic this week would have been about Ventura County's, (CA) effort to retrieve a geocacher's body.

 

I plan on rating this cache as a T5, but I'm wondering if I'm stepping into sacred grounds here. After all, no kayaks, scuba, ropes, etc., are required. Just a three foot stick to get you up and an eight foot stick to get you down.

 

I plan on putting that it is REQUIRED, not suggested, in my cache description.

 

Don

 

Don't think a walking stick counts. + I have done about as tough of climbs as possible without ropes, and I have never used an adjustable hiking stick. That said, it could still be a level T5. But, I have did one prety tough one (1000m elevation scramble with a small section of scaling rock face) that was rated T3.5. Maybe they had is wrong though. Don't know. It is realy a judgment call. If it is really difficult, you should probably try to explain the difficulty on the cache page so people have an idea of what to expect before heading out. As you can see, the terrain raiting means different things to different people, so T4 (etc.) may not be a good enough indicator.

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Don't think a walking stick counts. + I have done about as tough of climbs as possible without ropes, and I have never used an adjustable hiking stick. That said, it could still be a level T5. But, I have did one prety tough one (1000m elevation scramble with a small section of scaling rock face) that was rated T3.5. Maybe they had is wrong though. Don't know. It is realy a judgment call. If it is really difficult, you should probably try to explain the difficulty on the cache page so people have an idea of what to expect before heading out. As you can see, the terrain raiting means different things to different people, so T4 (etc.) may not be a good enough indicator.

 

Actually I adjusted one of mine recently after a run in with a cache, it was on top of a torn down train bridge, the tracks were up a very steep hill, very tough climb especially now in the winter time, muddy, rocky, wet ivy. I probably would have gotten stuck up there if not for my husband, I am terrified of heights(yet I love to go rock climbing figure that one out). We thought that we have encountered at least a 4 terrain but we got home to find that it was only a 2.5. I lowered the terrain on one of my caches after that one, also recommended to up their terrain rating when I wrote my log for that cache.

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My question is: could an adjustable hiking stick be considered special equipment?

 

I think that what is meant by special equipment are things that the average geocacher is not likely to have with him, or have ready access to, and requires some level of specialized skill to use.

 

Flashlights, screwdrivers, hiking poles, broom sticks, tweezers, etc. are not specialized equipment.

 

Climbing equipment, canoes or kayaks, SCUBA gear and similar equipment would be.

 

I would assume a Telescoping Magnetic Retrieving Tool would not be considered special equipment.

 

I have had one in my geobag since day one.

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I can't determine from your post why you feel a hiking stick is necessary. I have tried hiking sticks and feel uncomfortable using them. Especially in difficult terrain I prefer to have my hands free for balance and to grab handholds. I have no opinion on your terrain rating based on the use of a hiking stick as I would not carry one unless there was an explicit reason for needing one given in the cache description.

 

That hexacopter thing reminds me of AIMEE's flying sensors in the movie RED PLANET of 2000 starring Val Kilmer, Carrie Moss, Tom Sizemore etal. WATCH OUT! the next thing AIMEE will be breaking your ribs.

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