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So when did Kazakhstan annex Nova Scotia?


LeoGeo
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The page for the new International Space Station cache states that it's located in Kazakhstan, but the posted coords put it in the water off Nova Scotia.

 

Pretty obviously this is a simple mistake: if you change the longitude from West to East, you're now looking at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, in Kazakhstan, which is where you can "catch the bus" to go to the Space Station, and a logical place to spot the coords for this moving cache.

 

I posted a note to this effect on the cache's page, but TPTB summarily deleted it without explanation (and without fixing the coords). :D

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:D

 

Which cache is this?

 

B)

 

A cache was published on the international space station today. Apparently TPTB got annoyed by people posting notes to the cache page, so they locked it from further log entries. Perhaps they deleted them too as the OP is saying. But when I looked earlier today, there was a bunch of annoying "hey, I want to find this thing" type notes posted. :(

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:D

 

Which cache is this?

 

B)

 

GC1BE91, "International Space Station," supposedly posted by astronaut Richard Garriott. It was approved earlier today by "iryshe" (who is presumably one of the top executives of Groundspeak). Various people posted notes; a couple of people posted "finds." "Iryshe" then deleted some but not all of the notes and logs, and locked the page for any further logs.

 

What confused me was why my note, which was substantive and in the nature of offering a correction to an error, got whacked along with the joke fake "finds," as if I'd posted a commercial ad or an obscene picture or something.

 

One of the selling points of geocaching is that in addition to being fun, it's often educational. Coords for a Space Station cache that point to the Baikonur Cosmodrome on earth would obviously be educational, even if in a small way, because it shows where many of the astronauts/cosmonauts get launched to the ISS; lets American kids learn that Cape Canaveral is not the only spaceport in the world; might lead some folks (especially born-after-the-fall-of-USSR kids) to wonder and find out why Russian spacecraft are launched from another country, Kazakhstan; etc. A set of coords pointing to a random spot in Canadian waters, on the other hand, just looks goofy.

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:D

 

Which cache is this?

 

B)

 

GC1BE91, "International Space Station," supposedly posted by astronaut Richard Garriott. It was approved earlier today by "iryshe" (who is presumably one of the top executives of Groundspeak). Various people posted notes; a couple of people posted "finds." "Iryshe" then deleted some but not all of the notes and logs, and locked the page for any further logs.

 

What confused me was why my note, which was substantive and in the nature of offering a correction to an error, got whacked along with the joke fake "finds," as if I'd posted a commercial ad or an obscene picture or something.

 

One of the selling points of geocaching is that in addition to being fun, it's often educational. Coords for a Space Station cache that point to the Baikonur Cosmodrome on earth would obviously be educational, even if in a small way, because it shows where many of the astronauts/cosmonauts get launched to the ISS; lets American kids learn that Cape Canaveral is not the only spaceport in the world; might lead some folks (especially born-after-the-fall-of-USSR kids) to wonder and find out why Russian spacecraft are launched from another country, Kazakhstan; etc. A set of coords pointing to a random spot in Canadian waters, on the other hand, just looks goofy.

Isn't iryshe Jeremy's admin account?

 

Richard Garriott is Lord British, of Ultima fame. More space tourist than astronaut. I know he had a TB on the ISS, thought he couldn't get it published as a cache. He has another one in one of the deep ocean thermal vents, I believe.

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TPTB shouldn' have published it. Most of us can see the cache container, on occasion, but we have no access to the special equipment to get to it. Plus, I doubt the tenants would open the door for us to enter the establishment.

Sure they would. For US$30 million, which is how much Garriott paid according to Wikipedia. Just because you need special equipment (truckloads of cash) doesn't mean it shouldn't be published.

 

Now, whether he has permission from the owners to place it there, that's another question.

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The cache seems to violate a number of guidelines. Not in a fixed location. Cache owner not able to provide prompt maintenance.

 

But I guess Groundspeak wants the publicity.

The Reviewers have the latitude to stretch the guidelines if they choose. So if Jeremy wants to approve a cache in space, I say more power to him.

 

I just can't figure out why so many people got their shorts in a twist over it. There's plenty of caches on Earth that are beyond my reach. So now there is one in space that I won't be able to reach either. My outlook on life is unchanged.

 

(But it would be good to get the coords changed to Baikonur...)

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(But it would be good to get the coords changed to Baikonur...)

Jeremy's reply:

Regarding the ISS Cache, I'm looking at a way to update the cache listing with the current location of the International Space Station. Although the coordinates are wrong they are just a placeholder for now. I don't think we need to worry about anyone unable to find the cache, and it doesn't end up listed anywhere that would show up on search results.

 

B):o:o

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What an amazing cache! I would love to someday get this. Of course, much like several 5/5 caches around the world, I simply don't have the money (whether it be $4000 or 40 million) to accomplish this.

 

Amazing. Truly, humanity is a wonder, whether it be because we have the capability to put a space station in orbit and visit it, or because we give people the freedom to complain about it being a moving cache violating the guidelines of our hobby.

 

lol

 

Just needed my monthly dose of 'why do I even bother to check these forums'. Found it.

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And now it has a SBA.

 

From reading the other thread, it had several SBA's. B) I thought TPTB locked the page because they were just ticked off about all the "cool, I'd like to find this" notes, when in reality, they were ticked off over SBA's, which have obviously been deleted.

 

Oh yeah, and iryshe who published the cache is definitely Jeremy's admin account. I don't know, maybe it's the phonetic pronunciation of Irish?

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Funny comment.

 

Ist der Cache nicht gegen die Guidelines

 

Even someone who doesn't know german can read that one!

 

What I find funny is the log that seems to lock it is in German. Aren't a lot of the problematic armchair virtual cachers from Germany? Maybe they should aim to fix that problem before complaining about a cache approved by THE POWER THAT BE not meeting guidelines.

 

I actually think it is kind of cool and locking the cache page seems a bit extreme for some notes from people wanting to find it (though at the same time, we know everyone would love to find this one...stating that on the cache page doesn't really advance your chances too much).

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Seems to me that listing this as a Traditional cache doesn't quite fit the spirit of the guidelines.

 

It's got to be an offset (Multi) or Mystery. The cache is not at the posted coordinates, after all.

 

"Go to the listed coordinates, where you are to take the next flight into space. Once you arrive at the ISS, you are to look for Locker #218. The commander of the station can probably help you if you need it."

 

Multiple steps to get to a cache not at the posted coordinates? It's a Multi in my book. B)

Edited by Too Tall John
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Forgetting all the angst over the publication of this cache, the only important matter to discuss is...who's gonna be FTF?

 

I'm certain that somewhere in the world, someone is planning an assault on this one.

I am!

 

One of the things I do when I teach amateur radio at schools is set up a radio station for the kids to talk to the ISS.

 

If I can recruit an astronaut to join and sign for a 'team' I will log an FTF for the school.

 

Having an astronaut team member sign for us shouldn't be any more bogus than the cache itself! :o

 

As to the SBAs... rotsa ruck finding a Reviewer who will archive Jeremy's cache! B)

 

73 de W4AGA

Edited by TheAlabamaRambler
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Forgetting all the angst over the publication of this cache, the only important matter to discuss is...who's gonna be FTF?

 

I'm certain that somewhere in the world, someone is planning an assault on this one.

I am!

 

One of the things I do when I teach amateur radio at schools is set up a radio station to talk to the ISS.

 

If I can recruit an astronaut to join and sign for a 'team' I will log an FTF for the school.

 

Having an astronaut team member sign for us shouldn't be any more bogus than the cache itself! :o

 

As to the SBAs... rotsa ruck finding a Reviewer who will archive Jeremy's cache! B)

 

73 de W4AGA

 

I was thinking the very same thing here, gives me a reason to try for ISS Contact with our local club. If nothing else, get a note written on the log for the actual FTF physical cacher.

VA3GDP

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I just love the "Moving Cache" argument...

 

Does the Earth not rotate...does it not revolve...seems to me the Earth is one big space station...our "precious" satelites just happen to use Earth as a reference and thus everything seems stationary...

 

Traditional seems like the logical choice to me...by reading the cache page, one knows exactly where the cache is...

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I just love the "Moving Cache" argument...

 

Does the Earth not rotate...does it not revolve...seems to me the Earth is one big space station...our "precious" satelites just happen to use Earth as a reference and thus everything seems stationary...

 

Traditional seems like the logical choice to me...by reading the cache page, one knows exactly where the cache is...

 

I think we're talking relative motion here..

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One of the things I do when I teach amateur radio at schools is set up a radio station for the kids to talk to the ISS.

 

If I can recruit an astronaut to join and sign for a 'team' I will log an FTF for the school.

 

Having an astronaut team member sign for us shouldn't be any more bogus than the cache itself! B)

 

But, when the cache owner does his maintenance run, will he see your signature on the log?

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I just love the "Moving Cache" argument...

 

Does the Earth not rotate...does it not revolve...seems to me the Earth is one big space station...our "precious" satelites just happen to use Earth as a reference and thus everything seems stationary...

 

Traditional seems like the logical choice to me...by reading the cache page, one knows exactly where the cache is...

 

I think we're talking relative motion here..

Agreed...and relative to the Space Station...Locker 218 is stationary...no one is phsically moving the locker to another part of the space station...

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I just love the "Moving Cache" argument...

 

Does the Earth not rotate...does it not revolve...seems to me the Earth is one big space station...our "precious" satellites just happen to use Earth as a reference and thus everything seems stationary...

 

Traditional seems like the logical choice to me...by reading the cache page, one knows exactly where the cache is...

 

I think we're talking relative motion here..

Agreed...and relative to the Space Station...Locker 218 is stationary...no one is physically moving the locker to another part of the space station...

 

Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

 

Addressing the cache in question:

 

Whatever Jeremy wants to do in his sandbox is up to him. I'm not going to spend too much time kvetching over it.

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and relative to the Space Station...Locker 218 is stationary...no one is phsically moving the locker to another part of the space station...
So does that mean I SHOULD submit my Staten Island Ferry cache?

Go ahead...good luck with it B)

 

I think Jeremy has made it pretty clear that the Guidelines as stated do not easily apply to everything (hence, guidelines...ie...outerspace)...what is fair is not always equal and what is equal is not always fair...

Edited by ArcherDragoon
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I just love the "Moving Cache" argument...

 

Does the Earth not rotate...does it not revolve...seems to me the Earth is one big space station...our "precious" satellites just happen to use Earth as a reference and thus everything seems stationary...

 

Traditional seems like the logical choice to me...by reading the cache page, one knows exactly where the cache is...

 

I think we're talking relative motion here..

Agreed...and relative to the Space Station...Locker 218 is stationary...no one is physically moving the locker to another part of the space station...

 

Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

 

Addressing the cache in question:

 

Whatever Jeremy wants to do in his sandbox is up to him. I'm not going to spend too much time kvetching over it.

Go ahead...good luck with it B)

 

I think Jeremy has made it pretty clear that the Guidelines as stated do not easily apply to everything (hence, guidelines...ie...outerspace)...what is fair is not always equal and what is equal is not always fair...

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Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

It's been done. There was a mystery cache near here (San Diego) that was attached to a vehicle. Most of the time, the cache was findable at or near a specific set of coordinates. But sometimes the cache was not there.

 

Not sure you could get that approved these days, though.

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Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

It's been done. There was a mystery cache near here (San Diego) that was attached to a vehicle. Most of the time, the cache was findable at or near a specific set of coordinates. But sometimes the cache was not there.

 

Not sure you could get that approved these days, though.

A cache called ClayJar's AlaskaQuest 2004 was also attached to a car, and drove across the country letting a couple of hundred cachers sign the log. I was fortunate enough to see that one right as it was starting the trip.

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Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

It's been done. There was a mystery cache near here (San Diego) that was attached to a vehicle. Most of the time, the cache was findable at or near a specific set of coordinates. But sometimes the cache was not there.

 

Not sure you could get that approved these days, though.

A cache called ClayJar's AlaskaQuest 2004 was also attached to a car, and drove across the country letting a couple of hundred cachers sign the log. I was fortunate enough to see that one right as it was starting the trip.

 

That looks more like a roaming event than an actual cache. Cool concept. Interesting idea.

 

I could be a goober and mention the whole, "there is no precedence thing", but my point was that a moving cache is a moving cache. To not call it a moving cache becuase it's not moving in relation to some other object (not the planet under our feet) is wacky moon-man logic. If it's at one set of coords today and then another tomorrow, etc it's a moving cache.

 

B)

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Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

It's been done. There was a mystery cache near here (San Diego) that was attached to a vehicle. Most of the time, the cache was findable at or near a specific set of coordinates. But sometimes the cache was not there.

 

Not sure you could get that approved these days, though.

A cache called ClayJar's AlaskaQuest 2004 was also attached to a car, and drove across the country letting a couple of hundred cachers sign the log. I was fortunate enough to see that one right as it was starting the trip.

That looks more like a roaming event than an actual cache. Cool concept. Interesting idea.

I could be a goober and mention the whole, "there is no precedence thing", but my point was that a moving cache is a moving cache. To not call it a moving cache becuase it's not moving in relation to some other object (not the planet under our feet) is wacky moon-man logic. If it's at one set of coords today and then another tomorrow, etc it's a moving cache.

B)

It doesn't even meet the requisite "option of using accurate GPS coordinates as an integral part of the cache hunt" part of the guidelines.

Question... would a GPS even work on the ISS? I doubt it.

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Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

It's been done. There was a mystery cache near here (San Diego) that was attached to a vehicle. Most of the time, the cache was findable at or near a specific set of coordinates. But sometimes the cache was not there.

 

Not sure you could get that approved these days, though.

A cache called ClayJar's AlaskaQuest 2004 was also attached to a car, and drove across the country letting a couple of hundred cachers sign the log. I was fortunate enough to see that one right as it was starting the trip.

 

That looks more like a roaming event than an actual cache. Cool concept. Interesting idea.

 

I could be a goober and mention the whole, "there is no precedence thing", but my point was that a moving cache is a moving cache. To not call it a moving cache becuase it's not moving in relation to some other object (not the planet under our feet) is wacky moon-man logic. If it's at one set of coords today and then another tomorrow, etc it's a moving cache.

 

:)

Ah...but if Jeremy gets the webpage to reflect the "coordinates" of the station...than it is always correct... :lol:;);)

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Question... would a GPS even work on the ISS? I doubt it.

Civilian unit, definitely not. Isn't the altitude restriction something like 60,000 ft? Anyway, I think there is a velocity restriction as well, but I'm not inspired enough to look it up. Finally, I'd hope the interior of the ISS is well shielded, which would interfere with reception.

 

Anyway, I totally agree with Castle Mischief.

 

What I really want to know is, do astronauts earn frequent flier miles for distance travelled?

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What I find funny is the log that seems to lock it is in German. Aren't a lot of the problematic armchair virtual cachers from Germany? Maybe they should aim to fix that problem before complaining about a cache approved by THE POWER THAT BE not meeting guidelines.

I'm aware of several armchair loggers from the UK, who write their armchair logs in English. Following your logic, nobody should express any opinion about geocaching in English until "something has been done" about the English-speaking armchair loggers.

 

Of course, some of the armchair loggers are Americans too. Again, your logic seems to imply that the entire nation should refrain from any comments on the game until there's been a collective national effort to stamp out armchair logging.

 

FWIW, I share your view that those comments on the cache are misplaced. But you don't do your argument any favours with this kind of semi-xenophobic comment.

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Question... would a GPS even work on the ISS? I doubt it.

 

The orbit of the ISS varies from 173 to 286 miles above the earth. The orbits of the GPS satellites are around 12,000 miles above the earth. So I would expect that a GPS would work on the ISS, unless the skin of the station blocks too much of the signal.

 

I think this calls for an experiment. Anyone want to fund a ticket to the ISS for me and my Garmin so we can check it out?

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Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

It's been done. There was a mystery cache near here (San Diego) that was attached to a vehicle. Most of the time, the cache was findable at or near a specific set of coordinates. But sometimes the cache was not there.

 

Not sure you could get that approved these days, though.

 

The infamous Ventura Kids had one attached to their purple jeep and it was logged at many events :lol:;)

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Question... would a GPS even work on the ISS? I doubt it.

 

The orbit of the ISS varies from 173 to 286 miles above the earth. The orbits of the GPS satellites are around 12,000 miles above the earth. So I would expect that a GPS would work on the ISS, unless the skin of the station blocks too much of the signal.

 

I think this calls for an experiment. Anyone want to fund a ticket to the ISS for me and my Garmin so we can check it out?

See my post #44 - I'm saving you the trouble and expense :lol:

 

Anyway found this : http://sci.tech-archive.net/Archive/sci.ge...4/msg00091.html

 

For velocity limit looks like 1159 mph. The ISS orbits the earth once approximately every 90 minutes - speed is about 17,500 mph. So the ISS exceeds both speed and altitude limit.

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He who has the gold makes the rules... a pretty simple concept, really!

 

Clayjar had an ammo can welded to his bumper hitch, folks could meet him along his route from New Orleans to Atlanta to the Arctic Circle and back to New Orleans.

 

I got to log it in my driveway as he was passing through Birmingham.

 

If I recall correctly he made that trip in 11 days then archived the cache.

 

Basically ANY cache can be approved if you have the blessing of the frog palace.

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Addressing your logic:

 

Okay, then I'll put a cache in my car. Relative to my car, it's not moving either. I'll even put it in the glove box so it's not moving to another part of the car. Wha-huh?

It's been done. There was a mystery cache near here (San Diego) that was attached to a vehicle. Most of the time, the cache was findable at or near a specific set of coordinates. But sometimes the cache was not there.

 

Not sure you could get that approved these days, though.

 

The infamous Ventura Kids had one attached to their purple jeep and it was logged at many events :lol:;)

 

Got a link?

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