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purplywurply

How to hide in a stone wall

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Hi

 

I haven't hidden a cache before but have found a lovely square hole in a stone wall (Yorkshire, UK) just right for a cache box. I would need to put something such as a block of stone to conceal the cache.

 

How would the reviewers look on this when I submit the cache? Obviously I don't want people taking the wall apart (in this case that would be impossible anyway.)

 

How hard do people like the caches to be? I could mark the stone that hides it with an x or use wood or a different and distinctive type of stone?

 

I want people to be able to find this quite easily. What does anyone think?

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Hi

 

I haven't hidden a cache before but have found a lovely square hole in a stone wall (Yorkshire, UK) just right for a cache box. I would need to put something such as a block of stone to conceal the cache.

 

How would the reviewers look on this when I submit the cache? Obviously I don't want people taking the wall apart (in this case that would be impossible anyway.)

 

How hard do people like the caches to be? I could mark the stone that hides it with an x or use wood or a different and distinctive type of stone?

 

I want people to be able to find this quite easily. What does anyone think?

 

Please don't hide a cache container on, in or very near stone fences or walls. Such hides, in virtually all instances lead to drawing cache hunters to unintended hide spots and the removal of rocks or their disturbance and thus the defacing and damaging of the fence or wall.

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Although you are on the right track in making it easy to find, there are some that would make it difficult anyway, either by not reading the description or just suffering a case of cranial/rectal inversion.

 

Hiding in stone walls is not the best idea for this reason. Cachers pulling and prodding trying to get the right stone out, or trying to return it square peg/round hole style can damage these structures. A well built stone wall is a joy to look at and admire. Let's put the cache under the bushes at least 30 feet away to protect the wall but still let cachers enjoy to location.

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Hi

 

I haven't hidden a cache before but have found a lovely square hole in a stone wall (Yorkshire, UK) just right for a cache box. I would need to put something such as a block of stone to conceal the cache.

 

How would the reviewers look on this when I submit the cache? Obviously I don't want people taking the wall apart (in this case that would be impossible anyway.)

 

How hard do people like the caches to be? I could mark the stone that hides it with an x or use wood or a different and distinctive type of stone?

 

I want people to be able to find this quite easily. What does anyone think?

 

Please don't hide a cache container on, in or very near stone fences or walls. Such hides, in virtually all instances lead to drawing cache hunters to unintended hide spots and the removal of rocks or their disturbance and thus the defacing and damaging of the fence or wall.

That is what I was about to say as well, even to the point of posting a link to one of the stone wall threads, but a closer reading of the question makes me believe that this is not a "dry stone" wall, but a modern mortared wall that has an existing hole that he wants to fill with a fake block.

 

If you are indeed talking about one of your countries ancient hand-laid drystone walls... please don't even think about it.

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Hi

 

I haven't hidden a cache before but have found a lovely square hole in a stone wall (Yorkshire, UK) just right for a cache box. I would need to put something such as a block of stone to conceal the cache.

 

How would the reviewers look on this when I submit the cache? Obviously I don't want people taking the wall apart (in this case that would be impossible anyway.)

 

How hard do people like the caches to be? I could mark the stone that hides it with an x or use wood or a different and distinctive type of stone?

 

I want people to be able to find this quite easily. What does anyone think?

 

the spot you mention sounds like could be a good one for a high difficulty rating, and you could make it a micro

 

i think most people like a challenge with a higher difficulty, but it depends on what the trends are in your area

 

but if you choose to make it an easy find than since taking the wall apart is impossible you could put that in the description as well as "doesn't require climbing, tools" etc...instead of marking the spot with an X you could just provide a good hint

 

i don't foresee any objections from the reviewer as long as the place is not part of a historical/archeological structure, or anything to that effect that would go against the guidelines

 

Please don't hide a cache container on, in or very near stone fences or walls. Such hides, in virtually all instances lead to drawing cache hunters to unintended hide spots and the removal of rocks or their disturbance and thus the defacing and damaging of the fence or wall.

 

without knowing the location you can't assume will cause damage

 

there's plenty of hides in stone walls that work just fine

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Hi

 

I haven't hidden a cache before but have found a lovely square hole in a stone wall (Yorkshire, UK) just right for a cache box. I would need to put something such as a block of stone to conceal the cache.

 

How would the reviewers look on this when I submit the cache? Obviously I don't want people taking the wall apart (in this case that would be impossible anyway.)

 

How hard do people like the caches to be? I could mark the stone that hides it with an x or use wood or a different and distinctive type of stone?

 

I want people to be able to find this quite easily. What does anyone think?

 

When you submit your cache for review you will find that this is already disallowed in the UK - if it's a dry stone wall.

I'm not aware of any restrictions with mortared walls - other than the need to get the wall owners permission :D

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Based on the strong wording of previous discussions on this subject --- I would strongly encourage you to hide it well away from the wall with some kind of clue that seekers should not touch the wall.

 

This subject comes up a few times per year.

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I realised this needed careful thought - so thanks for all your comments. I'm just trying to be responsible. I'll check the wall out carefully..... if not no worries...... so many great places to hide caches around Yorkshire.

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As mentioned above by my honourable colleague Mr Keehotee, caches reviewed by the UK Reviewers not only have to follow the Groundspeak Cache Listing Requirements / Guidelines but also the UK-specific Guidelines set by the Geocaching Association of Great Britain. You will see that they are very similar to the Groundspeak ones but they also include a few extras such as

 

14. No cache should be placed in or on a dry stone wall.

 

MrsB

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Hi

 

I haven't hidden a cache before but have found a lovely square hole in a stone wall (Yorkshire, UK) just right for a cache box. I would need to put something such as a block of stone to conceal the cache.

 

How would the reviewers look on this when I submit the cache? Obviously I don't want people taking the wall apart (in this case that would be impossible anyway.)

 

How hard do people like the caches to be? I could mark the stone that hides it with an x or use wood or a different and distinctive type of stone?

 

I want people to be able to find this quite easily. What does anyone think?

 

the spot you mention sounds like could be a good one for a high difficulty rating, and you could make it a micro

 

i think most people like a challenge with a higher difficulty, but it depends on what the trends are in your area

 

but if you choose to make it an easy find than since taking the wall apart is impossible you could put that in the description as well as "doesn't require climbing, tools" etc...instead of marking the spot with an X you could just provide a good hint

 

i don't foresee any objections from the reviewer as long as the place is not part of a historical/archeological structure, or anything to that effect that would go against the guidelines

 

Please don't hide a cache container on, in or very near stone fences or walls. Such hides, in virtually all instances lead to drawing cache hunters to unintended hide spots and the removal of rocks or their disturbance and thus the defacing and damaging of the fence or wall.

 

without knowing the location you can't assume will cause damage

 

there's plenty of hides in stone walls that work just fine

 

Yes, I'm sure that there are. In geocaching, exceptions always seem to make the rule. This is true even in face of increasing evidence to the contrary that all responsible geocachers have been observing over the past 4-5 years. This game has become mainstream to the extent that proffering that such hides can be 'responsibly' placed as a matter of routine, is itself irresponsible on the face of it. Irresponsible in the extreme.

 

People, including geocache hiders have no business messing with, on or in close proximity to stone fences and/or walls, period. What's with that any way?

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You're kidding me, right?

 

Rectal/cranial inversions?

 

Some of you make it sound like it isn't even safe to go outside anymore.

 

I say go ahead and hide the cache in the wall, I've seen lots of well-done geocaches like that. It it's in a location away from the general public, you don't need to conceal it much at all. Another rock or chunk of wood/bark will do. Nothing too obvious.

 

Anyone who would start defacing a wall in the act of looking fo a geocache should stay home and type replies to this message board.

 

Geez.

 

:D

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You're kidding me, right?

 

Rectal/cranial inversions?

 

Some of you make it sound like it isn't even safe to go outside anymore.

 

I say go ahead and hide the cache in the wall, I've seen lots of well-done geocaches like that. It it's in a location away from the general public, you don't need to conceal it much at all. Another rock or chunk of wood/bark will do. Nothing too obvious.

 

Anyone who would start defacing a wall in the act of looking fo a geocache should stay home and type replies to this message board.

 

Geez.

 

:D

 

I agree, that's what they should do.

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You're kidding me, right?

 

Rectal/cranial inversions?

 

Some of you make it sound like it isn't even safe to go outside anymore.

 

I say go ahead and hide the cache in the wall, I've seen lots of well-done geocaches like that. It it's in a location away from the general public, you don't need to conceal it much at all. Another rock or chunk of wood/bark will do. Nothing too obvious.

 

Anyone who would start defacing a wall in the act of looking fo a geocache should stay home and type replies to this message board.

 

Geez.

 

:D

 

You might have missed the part where it was mentioned that it won't be published. He can hide if he likes, but it won't be published here. In the UK they are very protective of their dry stone walls. Some go back hundreds of years and are considered archaeological artifacts.

 

Like it or not, there are irresponsible geocachers who will dismantle a stone wall to find a cache. Hiders need to account for these types.

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You're kidding me, right?

Rectal/cranial inversions?

Some of you make it sound like it isn't even safe to go outside anymore.

I say go ahead and hide the cache in the wall, I've seen lots of well-done geocaches like that. It it's in a location away from the general public, you don't need to conceal it much at all. Another rock or chunk of wood/bark will do. Nothing too obvious.

Anyone who would start defacing a wall in the act of looking fo a geocache should stay home and type replies to this message board.

Geez. :D

If the coordinates put you at or very near a loose stone wall, and you can't find the cache, you aren't going to be tempted to poke around the wall? The type of stone wall that we are referring to as being disallowed can be centuries old.

dry_stone_wall.jpg

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That is a picture of a dry stone wall. I'm sure the OP knows the difference between a dry stone wall - which should not be used for a hide - and a mortared wall, which I have found quite a few caches in.

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That is a picture of a dry stone wall. I'm sure the OP knows the difference between a dry stone wall - which should not be used for a hide - and a mortared wall, which I have found quite a few caches in.

 

How do you keep them dry? I thought you guys got a lot of rain over there.

 

One of the three oldest caches that I've found (and the oldest in that state) is hidden right next to a stone wall. I've found a few caches hidden in stone walls but if there is another spot within 50-100' feet or so from the wall where it may be hidden, it seems to me that there isn't any benefit in hiding it there with a possibility that the hide could result in damage to the wall.

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I haven't hidden a cache before but have found a lovely square hole in a stone wall (Yorkshire, UK) just right for a cache box. I would need to put something such as a block of stone to conceal the cache.

 

I want people to be able to find this quite easily. What does anyone think?

I haven't read the other answers yet. My opinion on hiding a geocache in a (dry) stone wall is:

 

Don't do it!

 

No matter if you add a good spoiler pic or provide a good hint. The stone wall WILL suffer from cachers who look behind every stone. Please, try to find another location, where less impact on the surroundings can be expected.

 

GermanSailor

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Hi

 

I haven't hidden a cache before but have found a lovely square hole in a stone wall (Yorkshire, UK) just right for a cache box. I would need to put something such as a block of stone to conceal the cache.

 

How would the reviewers look on this when I submit the cache? Obviously I don't want people taking the wall apart (in this case that would be impossible anyway.)

 

How hard do people like the caches to be? I could mark the stone that hides it with an x or use wood or a different and distinctive type of stone?

 

I want people to be able to find this quite easily. What does anyone think?

 

the spot you mention sounds like could be a good one for a high difficulty rating, and you could make it a micro

 

i think most people like a challenge with a higher difficulty, but it depends on what the trends are in your area

 

 

You're encouraging the guy to hide a micro in a stone wall? :D You think "most people" like a "challenge with higher difficulty"? Man, I guess I haven't been to Kitchener in a while, and followed their trends. :ph34r:

Edited by TheWhiteUrkel
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That is a picture of a dry stone wall. I'm sure the OP knows the difference between a dry stone wall - which should not be used for a hide - and a mortared wall, which I have found quite a few caches in.

 

Could you please post or email the GCxxx numbers for a few of those mortared walls in which you have found quite a few caches? I just know that mortar makes all the difference, I'd like to learn more about that.

 

Thanks.

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Had a quick look at my finds and at least 7 out of my 153 were in walls.

 

A dry stone wall has no mortar holding the stones together, so an over enthusiastic cacher may try to remove stones in an attempt to find the cache, this could be detrimental to the wall's structure.

 

On a mortared wall there is mortar which holds the stones or bricks together so they cannot be removed, but there may be "holes" in the wall which a cache can be placed in, and maybe hidden by camouflage of some sort such as ivy, twigs, camo material - or even not camo'd at all, depending on how difficult the hider wants it to be.

Edited by Border Caz

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Hi, is it ok to hide a cache in a stone wall in old castle ruins? There was already a gap in the wall so I put the cache in the gap and put a rock over it.

 

 

Am I able to do this?

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11 hours ago, Lennylover736 said:

Hi, is it ok to hide a cache in a stone wall in old castle ruins? There was already a gap in the wall so I put the cache in the gap and put a rock over it.

 

 

Am I able to do this?

Looking at your finds, I assume you live in Ireland.  The answer to your question is likely found in the Ireland section of the Regional Geocaching Policies Wiki.  The sections on ancient monuments and walls may be relevant.

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On 1/31/2010 at 4:58 PM, purplywurply said:

How to hide in a stone wall

Not at all in my oppinion.

People are lazy an unpatient. It´s just a matter of time untill the stone wall will decay due to cachers impact.

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Dry stone walls (here in UK) serve three main purposes.  They define boundaries, confine stock animals & provide habitat for all manner of small creatures - insects, small mammals, frogs, birds.  Because they are man made they have an owner, whether a farmer, land owner, local authority etc so if you tamper with them to hide or seek a cache you are effectively trespassing on private property.

 

Walls are not random piles of stone but are built in such a way as to be sturdy, structurally safe & weather resistant being laid to deflect rain from simply washing into the centre loose filled "cavity" between the two skins of the wall.  They are strengthened by through stones & by the waller ensuring every stone he places sits firm & works with its neighbours.

 

As someone who helps to repair these traditional structures I know only too well how much damage is caused by one stone being deliberately dislodged from it's carefully structured position & thus affecting several other stones around.  Enough disturbance caused by eager cachers hunting for a cache will eventually see a final straw breaking the camel's back.  That stone that you did not get quite back into position will be targeted by the next searcher & the rot begins.  Meanwhile the further three stones you shifted in your search will likewise start to lose their role in the integrity of the wall.

 

Of course mortared walls with gaps or holes are a different kettle of fish & each such opportunity to hide a cache should be considered individually.  But hiding anything in one of our precious dry stone walls is a no-no.

 

Unfortunately we get instances (usually caused by deliberate wanton vandalism) where to stop the structure of the wall becoming unsafe we have to cement on the coping/top stones.  Which never looks satisfactory & is a last resort to preserve a wall from collapse.

Edited by grimpil
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16 minutes ago, grimpil said:

Dry stone walls (here in UK) serve three main purposes.  They define boundaries, confine stock animals & provide habitat for all manner of small creatures - insects, small mammals, frogs, birds. 

As somebody who has to do emergency repairs to dry stone walls, I totally agree with the whole of Grimpil's post. Hides in dry stone walls around me are definitely not encouraged. 

 

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This is nuts.

So, I'm from over here in the US. As a cacher in a 'kid' country (only 400 years of alleged civilization) I don't see 1,200 year old walls as you do. There are stone walls around my house that date back to before anyone gives a dadgum, but I wouldn't want them touched.

 

My take on this is that it doesn't matter WHAT kind of stone wall it is.

 

It's like the arguments about it being OK to set a hide in an electrical box as long as it doesn't have a 'green wire' or a 'Property of Power Company' sign or being able to drill into a tree as long as it's your tree; PEOPLE WON'T PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR ARCANE 'CONDITIONS'.


If you drill holes in ONLY your own trees, then you normalize tree-drilling.
If you hide a cache in an electrical box that isn't 'live', then you normalize poking around electrical equipment.
Fake sprinkler heads? Do you think people go up to front doors to pay for the real ones they break?


If you hide a cache in a wall, ANY KIND OF WALL, do you think the average person is going to discern the difference?

 

"I say, that wall has no mortar! I'd better stay away from it.
THIS wall, on the other hand, has mortar, so let me chip away at it; see if I can wiggle something loose!"

 

Even BRICK walls, once played with, will make it easier for the cacher to poke at a DIFFERENT wall next time.

Just stay away from walls.

-----------------------------------------------------
* I saw a cache once that encouraged me to move stones in a wall as long as I put them back before I moved the next one. Yikes!

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I've seen a 5 meter section of a small wall torn apart by cachers that moved a lot of rocks, and didn't replace them. When I approached this cache, I stood back and looked. It was obvious to me where the cache was. It is under the rock that didn't have any moss on it.

 

Unfortunately, there are some cachers that won't take the time to think things out, and only know the search and destroy method of finding caches.

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It may seem like a great idea for a while but sadly it never ends well... we have a cache in my area thats in a train tunnel... well its one of the brick ones and people keep pulling out the bricks and the entire tunnel is just destroyed due to it. if you are going to do one that isnt in the wall put a hint saying not to move anything...

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4 hours ago, Camroo said:

if you are going to do one that isnt in the wall put a hint saying not to move anything..

No, don't put it in the hint. Put it in big, bold letters right out front in the cache description. And even that won't be effective for all searchers. :wacko:

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41 minutes ago, TriciaG said:
5 hours ago, Camroo said:

if you are going to do one that isnt in the wall put a hint saying not to move anything..

No, don't put it in the hint. Put it in big, bold letters right out front in the cache description. And even that won't be effective for all searchers. :wacko:

 

With the app and the new search map trying their best to discourage people from looking at the description, maybe it would have more chance of being noticed if it's in the hint.

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11 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

 

With the app and the new search map trying their best to discourage people from looking at the description, maybe it would have more chance of being noticed if it's in the hint.

 

Put it as the title.

More chance of it being read?

Or maybe not... :rolleyes:

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11 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

 

With the app and the new search map trying their best to discourage people from looking at the description, maybe it would have more chance of being noticed if it's in the hint.

Yeah, perhaps. In that case, put it in both places. :)

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37 minutes ago, TriciaG said:

Yeah, perhaps. In that case, put it in both places. :)

 

Isn't it sad that we have become such a nanny society that people can no longer think for themselves without being giving instructions in words of less than 3 syllables in bold capitals & that the "me me me" prevalence overrides consideration of the consequences of their actions.  I don't need a reminder on every wrapper not to drop litter.

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On 8/28/2019 at 4:59 PM, Lennylover736 said:

Hi, is it ok to hide a cache in a stone wall in old castle ruins? There was already a gap in the wall so I put the cache in the gap and put a rock over it.

 

 

Am I able to do this?

 

Stop and think about this ... there is a partly broken down stone wall, with loose rocks around, one of which you have placed on top of the cache.

In order to find the cache, what will people do ?

They will pick up, move , discard stones, they have to, to find the cache.

Will they replace them with care where they should be ? Some people will not.

Will they destroy the ruins further by dropping or throwing the discarded rocks aside ? Some people will.

You are inviting damage by careless and thoughtless folk,.

 

That UK wiki also states that :

"Caches will not be allowed within the boundaries of any archaeological site whether scheduled or not without permission from the owner/manager of the site.  "

Have you permission from the landowner ?

 

I'd say even if you are 'able to do this' , you shouldn't.

 

 

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Someone mentioned that the OP may be in Ireland, so I just checked that wiki too :

 

"Ancient Monument (NI & RoI)

Ancient Monument covers any structure that may be of historic significance, susceptible to damage and usually protected under law. Examples include, but are not limited to, megalithic structures (tombs, stone circles, dolmens, etc), raths (pre-historic fort mounds), earth ditches and ruined buildings.

Any cache placed close to or within the confines of an Ancient Monument must be done so with the full permission of the responsible authority. Contact details of the person providing such permission should be provided at the time of submission."

 

and

"Walls (NI & RoI)

Drystone walls are particularly sensitive to disturbance when used as cache sites and use of them for cache placement is not allowed.

It is best practice not to use a hole in any kind of wall to locate a cache as it gets searchers in a mindset that this is a suitable location and can lead to damage in other locations in the future."

 

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No, don't do this. The wall will eventually get destroyed even if you write warning and give a clear spoiler photo. Place a cache a substantial distance away from the wall so people don't mistake it for the hiding place. Also, land owners permission. So please retrieve this cache very carefully and leave the wall as found.

 

Btw, I hardly ever post NAs, but if I see such a cache I always will. Especially in ancient monuments in countries that might not have explicit guidance on it. Seen historical sites partially destroyed by cachers searching for caches.

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I came across this one in Wales. I had not searched near any dry walls before and was a little hesitant but followed the hint " Base of ash tree". There were stones around the base of the tree and I spent a considerable amount of time looking there. The stones may have been once part of a wall that ran close to it. About to give up I glanced sideways at the wall thinking that it wouldn't/shouldn't be there but there it was. I guess a previous finder has not put it back where it was originally placed, which was confirmed by reading other logs later. Being from the antipodes, I was not familiar with local hiding rules but I am aware of the way these walls are constructed and not a little disappointed with the GZ so close to this one. Reading back through the logs, I think I only saw one mention concern about the state of the wall.

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As a fellow Yorkshireman living in an area that has plenty of dry stone wall I beg you not to.

 

Dry stone walls are easy to destroy, and difficult to rebuild. I've seen them fall down after people have pulled a stone out, resulting in an expensive and time consuming repair.

 

As others have said, it is against the guidelines to hide a cache in a dry stone wall.

 

A prolific hider local to me even puts a note in their description stating that it is not hidden in the wal, if the hide is within sight of one. 

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1 hour ago, South_Stander said:

As others have said, it is against the guidelines to hide a cache in a dry stone wall.

A prolific hider local to me even puts a note in their description stating that it is not hidden in the wal, if the hide is within sight of one. 

 

To be clear, those guidelines are under the geocaching policies wiki for Lennylover736's area.    This is an international forums.   :)

We've found many caches in dry stone walls, most on very old farm properties that are now game lands.

I've seen more damage on landscaped monuments than stone walls. 

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19 hours ago, cerberus1 said:

 

To be clear, those guidelines are under the geocaching policies wiki for Lennylover736's area.    This is an international forums.   :)

 

Maybe I could have worded it better but the OP is from the same area as me. It is still in the guidelines the OP should follow, whether they be international or regional guidelines.

 

19 hours ago, cerberus1 said:

We've found many caches in dry stone walls, most on very old farm properties that are now game lands.

I've seen more damage on landscaped monuments than stone walls. 

 

I cannot see what difference this makes to the OP. If anything you are inadvertently saying that it is OK to hide one in a drystone wall.

 

I can also deduct you know little about dry stone walls or how they are built. Are you qualified to say if a dry stone wall is damaged or not? I shoot with a friend who took an apprenticeship in building drystone wall building during the late '60s and he is now one of less than 50 people qualified in the country. He has pointed out damage to me that will cause the wall to fall or slip that I would never have seen. I've even known him stop for over an hour to patch a wall where there has been one single stone taken out.

 

I also cannot see what landscaped monuments have to do with anything. Please remember how far dry stone walls have being built on our landscape. There are examples near me (and the OP) that date back to the bronze age. Even the vast majority of the newer ones date back to the 16th Century, and these should be preserved as much as possible before the art of building them dies out. Sadly, most are constantly in need of repair as people sit on them, climb over them, pull the stones out, or even want to hide tupperware in the crevices. These repairs are expensive and time consuming - almost always at the cost of a farmer who is already struggling to make ends meet.

 

I would bet my mortgage on permission being denied if one was to ask to hide a cache in a dry stone wall.

 

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1 hour ago, South_Stander said:

Maybe I could have worded it better but the OP is from the same area as me. It is still in the guidelines the OP should follow, whether they be international or regional guidelines.

 

I cannot see what difference this makes to the OP. If anything you are inadvertently saying that it is OK to hide one in a drystone wall.

 

I can also deduct you know little about dry stone walls or how they are built. Are you qualified to say if a dry stone wall is damaged or not? I shoot with a friend who took an apprenticeship in building drystone wall building during the late '60s and he is now one of less than 50 people qualified in the country. He has pointed out damage to me that will cause the wall to fall or slip that I would never have seen. I've even known him stop for over an hour to patch a wall where there has been one single stone taken out.

 

I also cannot see what landscaped monuments have to do with anything. Please remember how far dry stone walls have being built on our landscape. There are examples near me (and the OP) that date back to the bronze age. Even the vast majority of the newer ones date back to the 16th Century, and these should be preserved as much as possible before the art of building them dies out. Sadly, most are constantly in need of repair as people sit on them, climb over them, pull the stones out, or even want to hide tupperware in the crevices. These repairs are expensive and time consuming - almost always at the cost of a farmer who is already struggling to make ends meet.

 

I would bet my mortgage on permission being denied if one was to ask to hide a cache in a dry stone wall.

 

This thread wasn't sent to the UK forums, but remained in the general topics.   Simply saying that things are different in other countries.

To make an open claim that they're not allowed, when someone not realizing you're only speaking of the OP's area is misleading.

Actually, I built a few stone walls now.  One of the fun benefits of working night shift and a vo-tech nearby.

We know of an entire game lands that the majority of hides are in it's stone walls. 

We had one for seven years before we archived it for dangers to the area.  Not a single issue about it's location.  :)

 

 

Edited by cerberus1
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4 hours ago, cerberus1 said:

Actually, I built a few stone walls now.  One of the fun benefits of working night shift and a vo-tech nearby.

We know of an entire game lands that the majority of hides are in it's stone walls. 

 

Now that does surprise me. If you have been taught how to build dry stone walls then you must be aware of how every stone has it's purpose, whether it be weight bearing or to aid with channeling wind or rain water. Any of these being disturbed can have a detrimental effect on the whole structure. Unless the method of building them in your location is different to mine, of course. That is why disturbing them is a big no-no here. Intact they can last many hundreds of years, once disturbed they can fall within hours.

 

They are also seen by some as having cultural importance. Someone with a keen eye can not only date the wall, know where the stone was quarried and tell you in which direction it was built, but also tell you who built it, who they served their apprenticeship under and even if they are left handed or right handed. As they are part of our history and heritage they are greatly protected. 

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1 hour ago, South_Stander said:

 

Now that does surprise me. If you have been taught how to build dry stone walls then you must be aware of how every stone has it's purpose, whether it be weight bearing or to aid with channeling wind or rain water. Any of these being disturbed can have a detrimental effect on the whole structure. Unless the method of building them in your location is different to mine, of course. That is why disturbing them is a big no-no here. Intact they can last many hundreds of years, once disturbed they can fall within hours.

 

They are also seen by some as having cultural importance. Someone with a keen eye can not only date the wall, know where the stone was quarried and tell you in which direction it was built, but also tell you who built it, who they served their apprenticeship under and even if they are left handed or right handed. As they are part of our history and heritage they are greatly protected. 

For people, like myself, who live in countries other than the OP's it's good to know these things if we happen to visit there. I'm not sure that some here know the difference between a stone wall and a dry stonewall, perhaps they do. Forewarned is forearmed.

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On 9/10/2019 at 6:13 PM, colleda said:

For people, like myself, who live in countries other than the OP's it's good to know these things if we happen to visit there. I'm not sure that some here know the difference between a stone wall and a dry stonewall, perhaps they do. Forewarned is forearmed.

 

I don't know anything about stone walls but a recent  train trip between Manchester and Sheffield in the UK took me past a *lot* of stone walls and I thought that they were pretty amazing

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On 9/2/2019 at 9:45 AM, colleda said:

 

I came across this one in Wales. I had not searched near any dry walls before and was a little hesitant but followed the hint " Base of ash tree". There were stones around the base of the tree and I spent a considerable amount of time looking there. The stones may have been once part of a wall that ran close to it. About to give up I glanced sideways at the wall thinking that it wouldn't/shouldn't be there but there it was. I guess a previous finder has not put it back where it was originally placed, which was confirmed by reading other logs later. Being from the antipodes, I was not familiar with local hiding rules but I am aware of the way these walls are constructed and not a little disappointed with the GZ so close to this one. Reading back through the logs, I think I only saw one mention concern about the state of the wall.

I  noticed that the example I gave above has been TD'd by a reviewer

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