Jump to content

Dick's add - buried caches


ChileHead
Followers 2

Recommended Posts

I got an ad from Dick's Sporting Goods yesterday for GPSs. What were they thinking? Bury an object in the ground somewhere? Don't their ad writers have a clue? Nice that it's right below the ad for the metal detector as well, to give additional credence to the whole buried thing.

 

 

Well, it's pretty easy to see there are 900,000 caches on the main page of Geocaching.com. Digging any deeper into it is apparently too difficult. Who the heck, when first hearing of the concept of finding containers with a GPS, assumes that they're buried? I certainly didn't.

Link to comment

Bury has more than one definition and although I understand why some might be upset, consider that bury has more than one meaning and that many geocaches are "buried".

 

Main Entry: bury

Pronunciation: \ˈber-ē, ˈbe-rē also ˈbər-\

Function: transitive verb

Inflected Form(s): bur·ied; bury·ing

Etymology: Middle English burien, from Old English byrgan; akin to Old High German bergan to shelter, Russian berech' to spare

Date: before 12th century

 

2 b : to cover from view <buried her face in her hands>

Link to comment

Hey, what's wrong with that?

 

It just goes in-line with:

 

"But wait, there's more! Order in the next five minutes and we'll include........" (they have said that for two years);

 

"Order now and we'll double your order............... a $xxx.xx value for only $x.xx (just pay separate s/h)";

 

"Guaranteed for life" (maybe, but the company closes next week);

 

"As seen on TV" (does this really make it good?)

 

 

My advice -- all who read such garbage should boycott them, regardless of the "value".

 

(Kinda hardline, aren't I?) :)

Link to comment

As uninformed as their ad might be, I dont think it's a big deal. Anyone that becomes interested due to their ad will end up here and will be able to clearly see the rules and how the hobby really works. Besides, nobody is going to learn about the sport through a $349.99 AD and just buy it without doing a google search on "Geocaching" first.

 

It's not like they're gonna buy the GPS, stop off at a field on their way home and bury their loose pocket change...

Link to comment

As uninformed as their ad might be, I don't think it's a big deal. Anyone that becomes interested due to their ad will end up here and will be able to clearly see the rules and how the hobby really works. Besides, nobody is going to learn about the sport through a $349.99 AD and just buy it without doing a google search on "Geocaching" first.

 

It's not like they're gonna buy the GPS, stop off at a field on their way home and bury their loose pocket change...

 

You'd think, but having seen some of the questions asked on these forums I think the listing guidelines aren't always the first stop on the road to caching education.

 

I wonder if a reviewer could comment on many caches they reject that violated the very basic guidelines?

 

(But I'm not exactly sharpening my pitchfork and lighting my torches either.)

Edited by Castle Mischief
Link to comment

As uninformed as their ad might be, I dont think it's a big deal. Anyone that becomes interested due to their ad will end up here and will be able to clearly see the rules and how the hobby really works. Besides, nobody is going to learn about the sport through a $349.99 AD and just buy it without doing a google search on "Geocaching" first.

 

It's not like they're gonna buy the GPS, stop off at a field on their way home and bury their loose pocket change...

 

I don't think there's a huge risk in new hiders reading the ad and burying tupperware, but think of all of the park managers, rangers, etc. that might catch that ad and then remember later "Oh yeah, I've heard of that geocaching thing, they bury stuff".

 

While no one is going to cite the ad as their source for restricting caching in their area, it seeps into that "general knowledge" that sure hurts sometimes.

 

P.S. No "sky is falling" meant here...just a bummer that they let this sort of misinformation slip through.

Link to comment

As uninformed as their ad might be, I dont think it's a big deal. Anyone that becomes interested due to their ad will end up here and will be able to clearly see the rules and how the hobby really works. Besides, nobody is going to learn about the sport through a $349.99 AD and just buy it without doing a google search on "Geocaching" first.

 

It's not like they're gonna buy the GPS, stop off at a field on their way home and bury their loose pocket change...

 

I don't think there's a huge risk in new hiders reading the ad and burying tupperware, but think of all of the park managers, rangers, etc. that might catch that ad and then remember later "Oh yeah, I've heard of that geocaching thing, they bury stuff".

 

While no one is going to cite the ad as their source for restricting caching in their area, it seeps into that "general knowledge" that sure hurts sometimes.

 

P.S. No "sky is falling" meant here...just a bummer that they let this sort of misinformation slip through.

 

I typed up nearly the exact same reply. :)

Link to comment

As uninformed as their ad might be, I dont think it's a big deal. Anyone that becomes interested due to their ad will end up here and will be able to clearly see the rules and how the hobby really works. Besides, nobody is going to learn about the sport through a $349.99 AD and just buy it without doing a google search on "Geocaching" first.

 

It's not like they're gonna buy the GPS, stop off at a field on their way home and bury their loose pocket change...

 

I don't think there's a huge risk in new hiders reading the ad and burying tupperware, but think of all of the park managers, rangers, etc. that might catch that ad and then remember later "Oh yeah, I've heard of that geocaching thing, they bury stuff".

 

While no one is going to cite the ad as their source for restricting caching in their area, it seeps into that "general knowledge" that sure hurts sometimes.

 

P.S. No "sky is falling" meant here...just a bummer that they let this sort of misinformation slip through.

 

I typed up nearly the exact same reply.

 

and i was on my way to composing almost exactly that same reply!

Link to comment

As uninformed as their ad might be, I don't think it's a big deal. Anyone that becomes interested due to their ad will end up here and will be able to clearly see the rules and how the hobby really works. Besides, nobody is going to learn about the sport through a $349.99 AD and just buy it without doing a google search on "Geocaching" first.

 

It's not like they're gonna buy the GPS, stop off at a field on their way home and bury their loose pocket change...

 

You'd think, but having seen some of the questions asked on these forums I think the listing guidelines aren't always the first stop on the road to caching education.

 

I wonder if a reviewer could comment on many caches they reject that violated the very basic guidelines?

 

 

Imagine a worst case percentage, then double it and you'd probably be ballpark.

Link to comment

While a metal detector isn't a traditional geocaching tool, I have certainly found many caches that would have been more quickly/easily found with a detector. I have found micros stashed on the forest floor, beside logs, stumps, rocks, etc. that have been "buried" by leaves or moss or other junk.

 

Now I don't think I could ever justify bringing a metal detector along when geocaching, but the ad certainly doesn't offend me as it obviously has others.

 

Just my 2 cents.

Link to comment

Caches throughout history have often been buried, the thought of 'treasure hunting' and supply caches is related to 'buried treasure' in most folks minds; I don't think geocaching is going to replace that common perception... so just the mention that geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game is going to make folks think 'buried treasure'.

 

Not much we can do about that besides assure landowners that Groundspeak's guidelines prohibit digging and hope that they can differentiate.

Link to comment

As uninformed as their ad might be, I dont think it's a big deal. Anyone that becomes interested due to their ad will end up here and will be able to clearly see the rules and how the hobby really works. Besides, nobody is going to learn about the sport through a $349.99 AD and just buy it without doing a google search on "Geocaching" first.

 

It's not like they're gonna buy the GPS, stop off at a field on their way home and bury their loose pocket change...

 

It might turn people off if they think they have to dig holes. They won't bother to find out about geocaching. And for those that don't geocache, they will think we go around digging holes.

Link to comment

They're trying to sell a metal detector too.....seems like they know exactly what they're implying. Its only a small white lie to get you to buy both!!

 

I know that company. They acquired the retailer I used to work for (Galyan's), and because I was too highly-paid and knowledgeable, they forced me out. They'd rather hire minimum wage shelf stockers than someone who knows a thing or two about outdoor gear.

 

Anyway, this sort of behavior is par for the course. You could raise a stink about it to them, but they won't care. The ad was a way for them to pitch two high tech (high margin) items. Win-win as far as they care.

Link to comment

Good idea! Buy a metal detector to find platic containers in the woods. :) Or it might help you find those darn micros in the woods. Except the buffalo tubes are aluminum and since it is a non ferrous metal I don't think metal detectors are too good at finding aluminum.

 

Maybe it could help you find a cache hidden in a parking lot light standard. :)

Edited by ScottKaren
Link to comment

They're trying to sell a metal detector too.....seems like they know exactly what they're implying. Its only a small white lie to get you to buy both!!

 

I know that company. They acquired the retailer I used to work for (Galyan's), and because I was too highly-paid and knowledgeable, they forced me out. They'd rather hire minimum wage shelf stockers than someone who knows a thing or two about outdoor gear.

 

Anyway, this sort of behavior is par for the course. You could raise a stink about it to them, but they won't care. The ad was a way for them to pitch two high tech (high margin) items. Win-win as far as they care.

 

Made no sense to me. I loved Galyans, my first choice anytime I needed outdoor gear, but Dicks bought them out and closed the stores, and they don't even carry most of the gear Galyans had. Galyans had equipment for outdoorsmen, Dicks has Sporting goods, big Difference. Dicks will never get a Dime of my money, I buy from Gander Mountain and Cabellas now. Dicks is only in it for the money, no matter what it takes to get it.

Link to comment

While a metal detector isn't a traditional geocaching tool, I have certainly found many caches that would have been more quickly/easily found with a detector. I have found micros stashed on the forest floor, beside logs, stumps, rocks, etc. that have been "buried" by leaves or moss or other junk.

 

Now I don't think I could ever justify bringing a metal detector along when geocaching, but the ad certainly doesn't offend me as it obviously has others.

 

Just my 2 cents.

Did you read the part on the GPS add that says Cacges are buried? I think that's the issue here, not the metal detector

Link to comment

As uninformed as their ad might be, I dont think it's a big deal.

I disagree. The issue here isn't whether or not cachers are going to start burying stuff all over the place. You are correct in your assertion that this is unlikely. The real issue here is perception and misinformation. I can tell you from my own struggles with a land manager, that there are folks out there, with the authority to impact where, when and how we play this game, who honestly believe that geocachers do bury stuff. The derived that misconception somewhere. If whatever that source was, had it been properly refuted, those same land managers might be responding to our caching requests with facts, as opposed to misconceptions.

 

This type of misinformation should be addressed, every time it shows its head.

 

Edit to add: KoosKoos, rob3k & flask beat me to the punch.

Edited by Clan Riffster
Link to comment

Except the buffalo tubes are aluminum and since it is a non ferrous metal I don't think metal detectors are too good at finding aluminum.

 

Oh, if only that were true! I used to have a metal detector, long before geocaching or GPS existed. Back when the pull-tabs on aluminum soda cans weren't made to stay attached to the can. I can't begin to guess how much time I wasted digging up thousands of aluminum pull-tabs.

 

Metal detectors are quite good at finding aluminum. Since most people who use them are hoping to find coins, a detector that only found ferrous metals would be useless.

Link to comment

Good idea! Buy a metal detector to find platic containers in the woods. :blink: ...

While I believe taht Dicks is more concerned with actually selling stuff then helping us find caches, it should be noted that many (most?) plastic-containered caches hidden in the woods have some metal stuff inside them.
Link to comment

Good idea! Buy a metal detector to find platic containers in the woods. :blink: Or it might help you find those darn micros in the woods. Except the buffalo tubes are aluminum and since it is a non ferrous metal I don't think metal detectors are too good at finding aluminum.

 

You would not believe how good they are at finding aluminum... :laughing:

 

I think everyone is running out of things to talk about.

I think you're right. We've almost filled a page and no flame wars have erupted. Where's [deleted] when you need them? :laughing:

Link to comment

CJ and I are both "discount point card" holders for Dick's.

Like others, we frequent the store to keep ammo and lower-end firearms in stock. Otherwise it'd probably end up as another Sports Authority, with only clothes, ski items and school-sports supplies.

 

E-mailed that we were sure that the Dick's chain never intended to promote ILLEGALLY buried caches and LITTERING, but "might" have had an ad man not doing proper research.

 

Got a reply yesterday. They stated that "another person" e-mailed also and they'll "look into it."

That's odd, there's a few here on this site alone who say they responded.

Link to comment

CJ and I are both "discount point card" holders for Dick's.

Like others, we frequent the store to keep ammo and lower-end firearms in stock. Otherwise it'd probably end up as another Sports Authority, with only clothes, ski items and school-sports supplies.

 

E-mailed that we were sure that the Dick's chain never intended to promote ILLEGALLY buried caches and LITTERING, but "might" have had an ad man not doing proper research.

 

Got a reply yesterday. They stated that "another person" e-mailed also and they'll "look into it."

That's odd, there's a few here on this site alone who say they responded.

 

Do you think a company would say "my bad, we made a mistake. We've had hundreds of complaints"? Trust me, they won't.

 

They will use the same standard answer of "we will look into it". It's a common business practice to minimize the perception of being a bad business.

Link to comment

CJ and I are both "discount point card" holders for Dick's.

Like others, we frequent the store to keep ammo and lower-end firearms in stock. Otherwise it'd probably end up as another Sports Authority, with only clothes, ski items and school-sports supplies.

 

E-mailed that we were sure that the Dick's chain never intended to promote ILLEGALLY buried caches and LITTERING, but "might" have had an ad man not doing proper research.

 

Got a reply yesterday. They stated that "another person" e-mailed also and they'll "look into it."

That's odd, there's a few here on this site alone who say they responded.

 

Don't know about the SA where you are but over this way they carry an inventory significantly larger and more diverse than you might imagine.

Link to comment

CJ and I are both "discount point card" holders for Dick's.

Like others, we frequent the store to keep ammo and lower-end firearms in stock. Otherwise it'd probably end up as another Sports Authority, with only clothes, ski items and school-sports supplies.

 

E-mailed that we were sure that the Dick's chain never intended to promote ILLEGALLY buried caches and LITTERING, but "might" have had an ad man not doing proper research.

 

Got a reply yesterday. They stated that "another person" e-mailed also and they'll "look into it."

That's odd, there's a few here on this site alone who say they responded.

 

Don't know about the SA where you are but over this way they carry an inventory significantly larger and more diverse than you might imagine.

 

We don't have a Sports Authority nearby but we do have a Dick's store. It has, by far, the largest fishing department within 30 miles, and that includes the Cortland Line Factory store. Considering there is a 40 miles long lake that has three species of trout, landlocked salmon, largemouth and smallmouth bass (the smallmouth bass fishing has been featured on national weekend fishing shows at least a couple of times), as well as perch, pickerel, walleye, and northern pike. There used to be a really good flyfishing shop nearby but it had a fire and it's long gone. Dick's is about the only decent source for fishing (and hunting) supplies in the area.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 2
×
×
  • Create New...