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GPS Phone


chumberwumber89
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Hi. I need a new mobile phone and GPS unit. Can I combine the two and get accurate GPS? With good GPS units costing over £150 it would be quite a saving on an iPhone or similar. Does anyone out there use a mobile to find caches?

 

I've got a Nokia N95 8Gb that I have had for a while that came 'free' with the contract. Prior to getting it I used a Etrex, and having had the Nokia a while, I started experimenting. Initially I used the Etrex and the using the phone for caching was a bit of a toy, but now I can't remember the last time I used the Etrex. In fact, I would be hard pushed right now to tell you exactly where it even is! Couple it to either SmartGPX or Geocache Navigator, and you're off.

 

HTH

 

Richard

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I have geocaching software on my Blackberry, which I used to use when caching in the City instead of my bright yellow GPS60 - you don't look such a tool walking around London carrying a phone in front of you!

 

However, it's terrible for caching in the countryside. I do a lot of caching in deepest Wales, and it's often impossible to get a signal there. Also, using the Blackberry as a GPS drains the battery in double-quick time, and it's not very robust regarding rain/puddles/generally being knocked about whilst clambering over stiles etc.

 

I have an Oregon now so I rarely use the Blackberry. It's nice as a back-up though - the other day the batteries went on my Oregon but we were able to use the Blackberry to find two other caches in the area before we headed home.

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I've used my iPhone a couple of times and it's pants for caching. I still use my Garmin and log using the iPhone.

 

I take my iphone when out caching and will use it to search for local caches and find out the relevant info about them, but I'll input the co-ordinates into my GPS and use that to actually find the cache. The iphone is fine for finding the general area, but accurate it is not, well not really to less than 100 feet or so. Plus the battery level falls down quicker than an Arsenal forward in the penalty area, so if you are planning on doing more than a few caches (and only in an area with excellent GPS coverage) I would definitely recommend a GPS.

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I have geocaching software on my Blackberry, which I used to use when caching in the City instead of my bright yellow GPS60 - you don't look such a tool walking around London carrying a phone in front of you!

 

However, it's terrible for caching in the countryside. I do a lot of caching in deepest Wales, and it's often impossible to get a signal there. Also, using the Blackberry as a GPS drains the battery in double-quick time, and it's not very robust regarding rain/puddles/generally being knocked about whilst clambering over stiles etc.

 

I have an Oregon now so I rarely use the Blackberry. It's nice as a back-up though - the other day the batteries went on my Oregon but we were able to use the Blackberry to find two other caches in the area before we headed home.

I bet you were using Geocache Navigator? If you haven't tried it yet you should look at Cacheberry. Even if you still want to use the Oregon as a GPS Cacheberry is great for paperless caching and logging finds (a bit like Cachemat, but better).

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I have geocaching software on my Blackberry, which I used to use when caching in the City instead of my bright yellow GPS60 - you don't look such a tool walking around London carrying a phone in front of you!

 

However, it's terrible for caching in the countryside. I do a lot of caching in deepest Wales, and it's often impossible to get a signal there. Also, using the Blackberry as a GPS drains the battery in double-quick time, and it's not very robust regarding rain/puddles/generally being knocked about whilst clambering over stiles etc.

 

I have an Oregon now so I rarely use the Blackberry. It's nice as a back-up though - the other day the batteries went on my Oregon but we were able to use the Blackberry to find two other caches in the area before we headed home.

I bet you were using Geocache Navigator? If you haven't tried it yet you should look at Cacheberry. Even if you still want to use the Oregon as a GPS Cacheberry is great for paperless caching and logging finds (a bit like Cachemat, but better).

 

Ta Dino, yes, I was using Geocache Navigator. Paperless caching isn't a problem with the Oregon though as you download all of the cache info as well as the waypoints onto it, and I prefer to write my logs when I get home so I can devote some quality time to them. I might look into Cacheberry if I go on holiday and can't get near a computer for a while though :blink:

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I've got a Nokia E71 and have used Geocache Navigator, and more recently geocaching live. I've found caches using both bits of software, but the battery issues as well as the ruggedness mean that it will never totally replace my 60Csx. The final issue is of course the access to the internet - not so good out in the wilds of the Peak District.

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Hi

Im new to Geocacheing and I use a Nokia 6210 and its wonderfull,I will admit Ive never used anything else being a newbie but I certainly have no complaints,its easy to use get me from a to z,and if you need a new phone and gps why pay more buying 2 gadget when you can save money by buying 1 with both in,it took us about half a day fidling with ours to get the hang of it and im not tec minded but even I can use it Malarkn1971 :laughing:

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I use my Nokia 5800 and until this week was using the free edition of geocache navigator, I also have a Garmen etrek but I can honestly say that my phone has proved to be more accurate in the hunts. I haven't used them up a mountain or anything, mainy local woods and city swoops, but the phone has definitely been better.

 

Im now of to hunt for new software for my phone since the free edition of geocache navigator has been stopped!

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New to caching so didnt want to have expense of buying dedicated GPS unit without trying it, used my Blackberry Storm with cacheberry and loved it so much I registered it only down side was battery life.

Thinking of buying dedicated GPS in the long term though.

An Otterbox Defender, a spare battery and a car charging cable would be a better investment....that's what I'm doing now. Total cost approximately £35. PM me and I'll tell you where I'm getting them.

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Hi. I need a new mobile phone and GPS unit. Can I combine the two and get accurate GPS? With good GPS units costing over £150 it would be quite a saving on an iPhone or similar. Does anyone out there use a mobile to find caches?

 

I've got a Nokia N95 8Gb that I have had for a while that came 'free' with the contract. Prior to getting it I used a Etrex, and having had the Nokia a while, I started experimenting. Initially I used the Etrex and the using the phone for caching was a bit of a toy, but now I can't remember the last time I used the Etrex. In fact, I would be hard pushed right now to tell you exactly where it even is! Couple it to either SmartGPX or Geocache Navigator, and you're off.

 

HTH

 

Richard

hello i see you have a nokia n95 8gb i also have same phone so how do i get or where do i get maps for phone can you help me out as to what i should do.thanks for your help..eddie

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Have used Geocache Navigator very successfully for lots of my finds (although I'm pretty new and not very active). Advantages: you don't need to plan in advance, you get the full description, logs and hints for any cache anywhere without needing a computer, you can create a field note that you later turn into a proper log, built in camera. It's completely paperless in one small unit.

 

Disadvantages: if you have no internet connection (think middle of forest, up mountain, anywhere at all if you are on the same network as me!) it won't work because it can't download caches and you can't load up waypoints in advance like you do with a GPSr, battery life is pretty shocking, you don't want to get them wet or dropped.

 

On balance I prefer to have the Garmin loaded up with a planned set of caches if I know where I'm going to be. But the phone is perfectly acceptable in many situations and is the only thing for a bit of ad hoc caching.

 

Cheers

Duncan

Edited by DuncanSutcliffe
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Hi. I need a new mobile phone and GPS unit. Can I combine the two and get accurate GPS? With good GPS units costing over £150 it would be quite a saving on an iPhone or similar. Does anyone out there use a mobile to find caches?

 

I use an XDA Guide WM6 smartphone with (deleted by moderator, unauthorized site scraping software)

 

Its very powerful and free software for any device running windows mobile.

With it you can:

 

Look up geocaches in your area (up to 500).

Look up caches around a specified coordinate.

Download the data for those caches (including decoded hint, all logs, trackables and photos).

Log your find live over mobile internet.

Pick and drop off trackables live over mobile internet.

Control your own caches (disable, perform maintenance etc).

 

I don't use my Etrex anymore and I now geocache completely paperless. :(

I can log my finds straight away so there's no logging when I get home.

 

You do have to check regularly for updates to the software but it can be downloaded over the phones internet in approx 1 minute. (1 megabyte download).

Edited by mtn-man
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You do have to check regularly for updates to the software but it can be downloaded over the phones internet in approx 1 minute. (1 megabyte download).

 

I update mine via the PC desktop - as I have a PAYG PDA. This keeps the cost down!!

You can do this via the Nicque link shown above. A small piece of free software (AppToDate) checks if I have the most recent update. This is also linked from the Nicque page.

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I started off using a little Geko 201 for caching, and found it fine, but since going paperless with an HTC TyTN II, I've never looked back. It works a treat and I now find the vast majority of my caches with it. I did upgrade to an HTC Touch Pro, but I hate the thing with a passion - it's meant to be better than the TyTN II, but is inferior in just about every way, so I dug the TyTN II out of a drawer and started using it again. I'm really glad I didn't sell it or recycle it.

 

The advantages of using a phone are:

  • ability to install whatever mapping and caching software you like - there's bound to be something that suits your needs
  • "Take two bottles into the shower? Not me!" - portability, only having to carry one device instead of two (although I usually take my Geko as well)
  • Paperless caching
  • Ability to log on the fly with suitable net access - if I've got a good signal where I am, I'll log my finds immediately, which makes it much easier to keep on top of the caching admin.

Disadvantages are:

  • Lack of waterproofing. If it's chucking down, the Geko comes out again, as it's much more robust in that respect.
  • Lack of battery life. GPS will run down the phone in just a few hours.
  • If you're using a live application that relies on net access, rather than accessing a previously loaded Pocket Query, you're a bit screwed if you lose the mobile signal, or are abroad where roaming charges are enormous

I overcame the battery problem by buying a charger that runs off 4 AA batteries - it keeps the battery in the phone nicely topped up and one set of AA rechargeables will charge the phone a good three or four times. Plus you can buy a set anywhere if you need them.

 

The Geko is still my weapon of choice when I want to enter co-ords on the fly, so when I've collected clues on a multi, I'll use the Geko to navigate, as it's just quicker and simpler.

 

Accuracy of phone and Geko appears to be almost identical, and certainly good enough for the vast majority of caches.

 

Lee

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I started off caching using the iphone, it's not that accurate and under cover you lose gps signal, I now own a garmin 100% better. I also use the iphone geocache to find caches that are nearby. Anyone live in kent (near sittingbourne area) want to go caching, I sometime go out on my mountain bike to find caches. :angry:

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