Jump to content

New World Record - 413 geocache finds in ONE day


ventura_kids
Followers 10

Recommended Posts

I am glad for the bump. I do like reading and posting here at gc.com - but for the sake of what sanity I have left I need to take breaks - I missed this thread when it was hot.

 

Congrats on the World Record! :)

I cannot believe that you aren't outside finding caches on such a beautiful day.

 

Haha - we are in the middle of a 3 day snow storm here in Western NY!

Link to comment

I am glad for the bump. I do like reading and posting here at gc.com - but for the sake of what sanity I have left I need to take breaks - I missed this thread when it was hot.

 

Congrats on the World Record! :laughing:

I cannot believe that you aren't outside finding caches on such a beautiful day.

 

Haha - we are in the middle of a 3 day snow storm here in Western NY!

 

That shouldn't stop you. According to a bunch of your buds in here, that is the very best time of all to go out cache hunting. Maybe it is the first day after....whatever. :):laughing::P

Edited by Team Cotati
Link to comment
Do the Math.

My Sock Puppet agrees with Bittsen, vary doubtful this happened, not only the numbers here lead to it being impossible, you also mention losing time on return trips down roads. This cuts the searching and singing time down even more. The numbers don’t add up! in my book. Getting out of the car, finding the cache, opening the cache, signing as a team, re-hiding, getting back in, getting back to a speed of 60 mph in an instant. The Cache Bandit does not buy this claim.

 

I'm with you Cache Bandits, the numbers just don't hold water, this is a bogus claim!

Edited by Hobo2
Link to comment
Do the Math.

My Sock Puppet agrees with Bittsen, vary doubtful this happened, not only the numbers here lead to it being impossible, you also mention losing time on return trips down roads. This cuts the searching and singing time down even more. The numbers don’t add up! in my book. Getting out of the car, finding the cache, opening the cache, signing as a team, re-hiding, getting back in, getting back to a speed of 60 mph in an instant. The Cache Bandit does not buy this claim.

 

I'm with you Cache Bandits, the numbers just don't hold water, this is a bogus claim!

 

I agree!! Well, no, not really. But we have to keep the thread going, don't we? :laughing:

Link to comment

2 things....

 

I can't believe EMC is getting all the credit for the World Record ! :lol:

We barely even invited her to come along with us. :lol:

Next time, we won't let her sit in the back seat and ride along. :)

 

also....

 

I think I'll go make a quick video of us finding a cache every 3 minutes....just so people can see how easily it can be done.

The reason it is so difficult, is because it must be for 24 hours. There are many, many things that go wrong along the way.

Link to comment
I can't believe EMC is getting all the credit for the World Record ! :antenna:

We barely even invited her to come along with us. :D

Next time, we won't let her sit in the back seat and ride along. :antenna:

What I heard was that she wanted to do a lot more than 413 but others in the car started getting sleepy and couldn't keep up the pace. :antenna::antenna:

Link to comment

WOW, Thats great Congratulations, im sure that took a lot of time, effort and dedication. Im sure you had and awesome time while you were at it!

 

Just wondering how do you guys find so many in one day, i have a hard time fitting in five for the afternoon.

 

Do you like own a plane and fly around to different locations and hit up the caches in the area?

Link to comment

The key is to plan your caches before leaving the house.

 

First, you need to pick caches that can be done quick, which eliminates most hiking caches unless there's a bunch close together along a trail. Multis are probably out. Puzzles are okay if they've been solved beforehand and offer a quick final. Virtuals often take longer than a traditional.

 

It's important to look at each cache before adding it to your "to do" list. For instance, if a cache is listed as easy and it has a few DNFs in a row, it may be missing, so skip it.

 

Set a time limit and leave if you haven't found it by that time. The cache may be there, but it's better to DNF it than spend 20 minutes looking and finding it because during that 20 minutes, you could have found 4 or 5 others.

 

After you get all the caches picked, create a route using routing software to put them in the most efficient order and then try to stick to that route as much as possible.

 

Also, depending on where you're caching, if you're going to be in a city, it's better to head there early in the morning when people are still asleep and no one is out and about. Get the city done early and head to the suburbs when the city gets busy.

 

Also, things like stickers and such can help save time when it comes to signing in.

Edited by Skippermark
Link to comment

The key is to plan your caches before leaving the house.

 

First, you need to pick caches that can be done quick, which eliminates most hiking caches unless there's a bunch close together along a trail. Multis are probably out. Puzzles are okay if they've been solved beforehand and offer a quick final. Virtuals often take longer than a traditional.

 

It's important to look at each cache before adding it to your "to do" list. For instance, if a cache is listed as easy and it has a few DNFs in a row, it may be missing, so skip it.

 

Set a time limit and leave if you haven't found it by that time. The cache may be there, but it's better to DNF it than spend 20 minutes looking and finding it because during that 20 minutes, you could have found 4 or 5 others.

 

After you get all the caches picked, create a route using routing software to put them in the most efficient order and then try to stick to that route as much as possible.

 

Also, depending on where you're caching, if you're going to be in a city, it's better to head there early in the morning when people are still asleep and no one is out and about. Get the city done early and head to the suburbs when the city gets busy.

 

Also, things like stickers and such can help save time when it comes to signing in.

 

thanks for the tips.

That sure sounds like a lot of work, almost like planning a vacation!

 

I will keep all that in mind for when im ready for a high number cache run, or the way some caching days go i'll also keep the tips in mind for a regular cache run,lol :antenna:

Link to comment
thanks for the tips.

That sure sounds like a lot of work, almost like planning a vacation!

 

I will keep all that in mind for when im ready for a high number cache run, or the way some caching days go i'll also keep the tips in mind for a regular cache run,lol :antenna:

I actually like doing it. If something becomes a chore and isn't fun, then don't do it. The most important thing is to go out and have fun.

 

The best (and easiest) advice I can give if you really want to do a numbers run is to pick the caches you want to do before heading out. That way you're not caching "blind" and trying to pick caches to find while out and about and not really knowing anything about them.

 

The other stuff is secondary and not needed unless you wanted to go "crazy" like the group that found 413.

 

Simply knowing which caches you want to do is a huge time saver.

Link to comment

The key is to plan your caches before leaving the house.

 

First, you need to pick caches that can be done quick, which eliminates most hiking caches unless there's a bunch close together along a trail. Multis are probably out. Puzzles are okay if they've been solved beforehand and offer a quick final. Virtuals often take longer than a traditional.

 

It's important to look at each cache before adding it to your "to do" list. For instance, if a cache is listed as easy and it has a few DNFs in a row, it may be missing, so skip it.

 

Set a time limit and leave if you haven't found it by that time. The cache may be there, but it's better to DNF it than spend 20 minutes looking and finding it because during that 20 minutes, you could have found 4 or 5 others.

 

After you get all the caches picked, create a route using routing software to put them in the most efficient order and then try to stick to that route as much as possible.

 

Also, depending on where you're caching, if you're going to be in a city, it's better to head there early in the morning when people are still asleep and no one is out and about. Get the city done early and head to the suburbs when the city gets busy.

 

Also, things like stickers and such can help save time when it comes to signing in.

 

Wow!.... Very well stated. I have nothing to add. :antenna:

Great tips.

Link to comment

The key is to plan your caches before leaving the house.

 

First, you need to pick caches that can be done quick, which eliminates most hiking caches unless there's a bunch close together along a trail. Multis are probably out. Puzzles are okay if they've been solved beforehand and offer a quick final. Virtuals often take longer than a traditional.

 

It's important to look at each cache before adding it to your "to do" list. For instance, if a cache is listed as easy and it has a few DNFs in a row, it may be missing, so skip it.

 

Set a time limit and leave if you haven't found it by that time. The cache may be there, but it's better to DNF it than spend 20 minutes looking and finding it because during that 20 minutes, you could have found 4 or 5 others.

 

After you get all the caches picked, create a route using routing software to put them in the most efficient order and then try to stick to that route as much as possible.

 

Also, depending on where you're caching, if you're going to be in a city, it's better to head there early in the morning when people are still asleep and no one is out and about. Get the city done early and head to the suburbs when the city gets busy.

 

Also, things like stickers and such can help save time when it comes to signing in.

 

Wow!.... Very well stated. I have nothing to add. :antenna:

Great tips.

 

I will have to ask my lawyer if a sticker counts as a signature... pretty sure it isnt in most cases.

Link to comment

The key is to plan your caches before leaving the house.

 

First, you need to pick caches that can be done quick, which eliminates most hiking caches unless there's a bunch close together along a trail. Multis are probably out. Puzzles are okay if they've been solved beforehand and offer a quick final. Virtuals often take longer than a traditional.

 

It's important to look at each cache before adding it to your "to do" list. For instance, if a cache is listed as easy and it has a few DNFs in a row, it may be missing, so skip it.

 

Set a time limit and leave if you haven't found it by that time. The cache may be there, but it's better to DNF it than spend 20 minutes looking and finding it because during that 20 minutes, you could have found 4 or 5 others.

 

After you get all the caches picked, create a route using routing software to put them in the most efficient order and then try to stick to that route as much as possible.

 

Also, depending on where you're caching, if you're going to be in a city, it's better to head there early in the morning when people are still asleep and no one is out and about. Get the city done early and head to the suburbs when the city gets busy.

 

Also, things like stickers and such can help save time when it comes to signing in.

 

Wow!.... Very well stated. I have nothing to add. :antenna:

Great tips.

 

I will have to ask my lawyer if a sticker counts as a signature... pretty sure it isnt in most cases.

If you could have a real signature put on a sticker or just pre-sign a bunch of blank stickers before you leave the house, thats legal. I know that you can actually have your real signature made in to a stamp and its totally legal, business type people use them all the time.

Link to comment

The key is to plan your caches before leaving the house.

 

First, you need to pick caches that can be done quick, which eliminates most hiking caches unless there's a bunch close together along a trail. Multis are probably out. Puzzles are okay if they've been solved beforehand and offer a quick final. Virtuals often take longer than a traditional.

 

It's important to look at each cache before adding it to your "to do" list. For instance, if a cache is listed as easy and it has a few DNFs in a row, it may be missing, so skip it.

 

Set a time limit and leave if you haven't found it by that time. The cache may be there, but it's better to DNF it than spend 20 minutes looking and finding it because during that 20 minutes, you could have found 4 or 5 others.

 

After you get all the caches picked, create a route using routing software to put them in the most efficient order and then try to stick to that route as much as possible.

 

Also, depending on where you're caching, if you're going to be in a city, it's better to head there early in the morning when people are still asleep and no one is out and about. Get the city done early and head to the suburbs when the city gets busy.

 

Also, things like stickers and such can help save time when it comes to signing in.

 

Wow!.... Very well stated. I have nothing to add. :P

Great tips.

 

I will have to ask my lawyer if a sticker counts as a signature... pretty sure it isnt in most cases.

If you could have a real signature put on a sticker or just pre-sign a bunch of blank stickers before you leave the house, thats legal. I know that you can actually have your real signature made in to a stamp and its totally legal, business type people use them all the time.

 

Actually no. Signature stamps are recognized in certain cases (such as a notary)

A sticker signature would never be acknowledged.

Link to comment

The key is to plan your caches before leaving the house.

 

First, you need to pick caches that can be done quick, which eliminates most hiking caches unless there's a bunch close together along a trail. Multis are probably out. Puzzles are okay if they've been solved beforehand and offer a quick final. Virtuals often take longer than a traditional.

 

It's important to look at each cache before adding it to your "to do" list. For instance, if a cache is listed as easy and it has a few DNFs in a row, it may be missing, so skip it.

 

Set a time limit and leave if you haven't found it by that time. The cache may be there, but it's better to DNF it than spend 20 minutes looking and finding it because during that 20 minutes, you could have found 4 or 5 others.

 

After you get all the caches picked, create a route using routing software to put them in the most efficient order and then try to stick to that route as much as possible.

 

Also, depending on where you're caching, if you're going to be in a city, it's better to head there early in the morning when people are still asleep and no one is out and about. Get the city done early and head to the suburbs when the city gets busy.

 

Also, things like stickers and such can help save time when it comes to signing in.

 

Wow!.... Very well stated. I have nothing to add. :)

Great tips.

 

I will have to ask my lawyer if a sticker counts as a signature... pretty sure it isnt in most cases.

If you could have a real signature put on a sticker or just pre-sign a bunch of blank stickers before you leave the house, thats legal. I know that you can actually have your real signature made in to a stamp and its totally legal, business type people use them all the time.

 

Actually no. Signature stamps are recognized in certain cases (such as a notary)

A sticker signature would never be acknowledged.

 

what if I pre-sign a bunch of blank stickers? like actually sign each one with a pen before i leave the house? :P

Link to comment

What question was that?

Well, On November 3, "brslk" asked how the scenery was...Only a few posts later, "Ventura Kids" answered that question and provided the photo...but I guess that's a self indulgent Bump.

 

Umm...A Question...

...and how was the scenery along the way?

 

and then...An Answer...

 

The scenery was different than anything I've ever seen. It was sunflowers as far as I could see.... and then flat dirt as far as I could see. Being from a big city (Los Angeles), I've never seen so much of nothing. It was great!

 

2ef60ddd-4c3a-405b-ac20-37a1e31212f4.jpg

 

It looks pretty straight forward to me, but of course, complaining about people bumping their topic only serves to really bump it.

Edited by WRITE SHOP ROBERT
Link to comment
What question was that?
Well, On November 3, "brslk" asked how the scenery was...Only a few posts later, "Ventura Kids" answered that question and provided the photo...but I guess that's a self indulgent Bump.

 

Umm...A Question...

...and how was the scenery along the way?
and then...An Answer...
The scenery was different than anything I've ever seen. It was sunflowers as far as I could see.... and then flat dirt as far as I could see. Being from a big city (Los Angeles), I've never seen so much of nothing. It was great!

 

<snip>

It looks pretty straight forward to me, but of course, complaining about people bumping their topic only serves to really bump it.
You realize that the bump that I was referring to happened over a week after the one that you are defending, right?

 

If you find my post dated December 10th and look at the post made seven minutes previously, you will find the post in question.

Edited by sbell111
Link to comment
If you could have a real signature put on a sticker or just pre-sign a bunch of blank stickers before you leave the house, thats legal. I know that you can actually have your real signature made in to a stamp and its totally legal, business type people use them all the time.

People legally "sign" documents all the time without ever picking up a pen. Sometimes it's done with a stamp. Sometimes it's a signature that's been scanned electronically into a computer and pasted onto a document. Heck, with the IRS, you "sign" your electronic tax return by providing info from last years return and enter and electronic "PIN." And, on certain websites when you click "Agree," you are entering into a legally binding agreement without ever having actually written anything.

 

Yes, there are certain times where only a physical written signature will do, but for caching, it's not worth worrying about how someone signs a log. If a group finds one of my caches, I don't care if each person signs their name individually, one person signs in for everyone, they use a sticker with their names printed on labels or they use initials instead of their full caching name.

 

That's how most people do it around here. If someone is caching alone, and their name is "The Mighty Cacher," they'll usually sign in as TMC.

Link to comment

A few cachers want to know how it is possible to find one cache every 3 minutes and 20 seconds.

It actually is not that fast under the right conditions. The caches have to be close together, easy to find, and no traffic or parking issues.

So, I'm going to have EMC of Northridge make a quick movie showing us "Casual Caching" in less than 3 minutes per cache. She will post it on her blog..... I'll get the link.

Link to comment

Last year we did something almost just like this, only it was in an area that we knew was cache saturated (there is a cacher there who has over 10000 finds and well over 1000 hides) and in which I used to live, so I knew the area pretty well (or so I thought). I downloaded the entire area of caches, and scrubbed the list to include only caches that had been found failrly recently, were close to a road, had less than a 3 stars for difficulty and terrain, had no DNFs as their last log, and probably a few other criteria I donm't recall. I loaded the whole query into MapSource, and just connected the dots to make our route. We met up around 11:30 PM so I could load everyone's GPS with the same data so we knew we were all on the same page, and we met pretty much right by the pine tree the first cache was in. At the stroke of 12, we grabbed it, signed it, and took off for the next one. We were going along pretty well, averaging about 16 finds per hour (for you numbers junkies, that would be 384 in a 24 hour period) and then sometime in midafternoon we hit a wall. Just dead tired from no sleep the night before. We slowed down considerably, and I got to where, as the driver, i could just stay awake long enough to get us to the next cache, park the jeep, and would fall asleep until the other two got back in. We did stay out the full 24, but ended up with 234 finds, or just under 10 per hour.

 

So, figure that in. I think that if we had really gotten some good sleep the night before, and had some "power-trails" in our hunt where we didn't have to do any searching (many of ours were bison tubes in pine trees) we could have very easily maintained an 18 cache per hour pace. Our best pace was at night/early morning, primarily because there were no other cars on the road (other than the two cops who wanted to see what we were up to) and we were still invigorated.

 

The real trick is having your system down. Everyone has a job, and they do it, every single time, cache after cache. Our system was that we had a 60CSx on the dash, and each member of the team had one also. We had a laptop in the back seat with our route, so the person in the back could look at the map and see which cache we were going to next. He would call that out, and I would set a GOTO for that cache. By this time, our signer was usually back in the jeep, and off we went. While we were driving, the signer (riding shotgun) would check the logs for any hints, and read the hint aloud to the other two, so we all had all the information. Wehn we got to a cache, depending on whether we had already determined on approach where it was, and how close we could park, one or all of us would get out and find the cache. As sooni as it was found, the finder would hand it to the signer and indicate where it was hidden, and the two non-signers would head for the jeep. The signer would then sign the cache with the code name we had selected for the run (shorthand for all of us). When he was done signing, he returned to the jeep, where we were waiting with the next cache queued up.

 

I can understand why some would have doubts about something like this, if they have never done it. When I went to Geowoodstock in 2008 there was a group there that had found 300 and something caches, and they had t-shirts and everything made up. I had my doubts, but "whatever." Then I was talking to another cacher who had gone into the very area where they did their hunt, just after they did it, and she mentioned that many of the caches they had found were nmot even replaced properly. They were open, on the ground, in many cases the logs were not even in the container, and in some cases they had just signed the container itself. Now , in case like that, if there were some official record-keeping body, I would disqualify them, period. If we had employed practices like that, I think we could easily have logged 100 more finds, but that's not how it's done. I only hope (and I trust to be the case) that you fine folks who accomplished this feat employed the best practices and ethics of our sport in doing so.

 

All that said, way to go. I, for one, can appreciate what it took. How long did you sleep AFTER you got back to the hotel?

Link to comment

This is amazing, I can't believe all the people that are dying to debunk that this happened just to make themselves feel better? :D

 

Honestly, weather it's 413 cache's in 24 hours or 200, it's still an amazing feat, and there is no question that you guys were there and did this run for a full 24 hours. The numbers are amazing, I was looking at all the cache's hidden in that general area, and I have no doubt in my mind that this can be done, I just wish I lived close to Denver, because I would love to make a run in that area.

 

Thank you for showing us what can happen when you have great cacher's with determination and drive!!

 

:(

Link to comment

The New number to reach to claim the fame is 481

 

The new world record is held by Picht and Elmbaek

28. december 2009 the danish geocachers Picht and Elmbaek found a record breaking 480 caches in 20 hours. 251 in Denmark and the rest in Sweden. 2 hours transport between the found places included in the 20 hours.

 

This made in the south scandinavian winter with sunrise 09:35 and sunset 16:40 and about 0ºC at daytime

Link to comment

The New number to reach to claim the fame is 481

 

The new world record is held by Picht and Elmbaek

28. december 2009 the danish geocachers Picht and Elmbaek found a record breaking 480 caches in 20 hours. 251 in Denmark and the rest in Sweden. 2 hours transport between the found places included in the 20 hours.

 

This made in the south scandinavian winter with sunrise 09:35 and sunset 16:40 and about 0ºC at daytime

 

GAME ON!!! (for someone.)

Link to comment

The New number to reach to claim the fame is 481

 

The new world record is held by Picht and Elmbaek

28. december 2009 the danish geocachers Picht and Elmbaek found a record breaking 480 caches in 20 hours. 251 in Denmark and the rest in Sweden. 2 hours transport between the found places included in the 20 hours.

 

This made in the south scandinavian winter with sunrise 09:35 and sunset 16:40 and about 0ºC at daytime

 

Gotta love it. :);):huh:

Link to comment

The New number to reach to claim the fame is 481

 

The new world record is held by Picht and Elmbaek

28. december 2009 the danish geocachers Picht and Elmbaek found a record breaking 480 caches in 20 hours. 251 in Denmark and the rest in Sweden. 2 hours transport between the found places included in the 20 hours.

 

This made in the south scandinavian winter with sunrise 09:35 and sunset 16:40 and about 0ºC at daytime

 

Darn. And I figured Ventura Kids just randomly bumped the thread again. :)

 

Congratulations to them! Unless they just scribbled P & E on the outside of the containers with paint marker or something. :huh:

Link to comment

I've known from the lessons learned during our attempt that 500 is certainly possible, my skepticism-meter won't really tweak until we see greater than 500 in 24 hours. I do wonder why this team stopped short of that, either 500 or 24 hours, but man I bet they had fun!

 

I want to read how they did it not because I don't believe it but just to see how they did it! :)

Link to comment

I've known from the lessons learned during our attempt that 500 is certainly possible, my skepticism-meter won't really tweak until we see greater than 500 in 24 hours. I do wonder why this team stopped short of that, either 500 or 24 hours, but man I bet they had fun!

 

I want to read how they did it not because I don't believe it but just to see how they did it! :huh:

 

Oh hey, sorry about that paint marker crack. Just trying to be wacky and zany. :)

 

Well, it looks like there was a 250 cache power trail (caches named PT01-PT250) hidden by username "Vels" the day after Christmas, as seen here I'm sure that was a major factor in making this possible.

Link to comment

can we get the thread's title updated now?

There are no rules for the (officially non-existent) title of World Record but there are a few generally agreed-upon expectations by the community if we are to accept something as one... sign the log, stay together, don't sign the container with a Sharpie :huh: etc.

 

You can find all the caches you want but unless the community wishes to accept your methods you won't be recognized as having done anything beyond having a good day with pals out caching! :)

 

Until we hear how this team did what they did we can't know whether or not VK's record still stands.

Link to comment

Since there is no record, it still doesn't stand. :):D;)

 

However I do accept this new non-record as the current world non-record. Great job guys. You may wear the crown until the next non-record is set. You may however keep the Hummer for as long as you wish. :huh:

Edited by Team Cotati
Link to comment

can we get the thread's title updated now?

There are no rules for the (officially non-existent) title of World Record but there are a few generally agreed-upon expectations by the community if we are to accept something as one... sign the log, stay together, don't sign the container with a Sharpie :blink: etc.

 

You can find all the caches you want but unless the community wishes to accept your methods you won't be recognized as having done anything beyond having a good day with pals out caching! ;)

 

Until we hear how this team did what they did we can't know whether or not VK's record still stands.

Until we hear evidence that the team did not do what they claim to have done, they are the so-called record holder.

 

Congratulations Picht and Elmbaek

Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Followers 10
×
×
  • Create New...