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Mega Scooter

The Tringle Blaze

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The Triangle Blaze

 

I have recovered several Marks that have a tree with a Triangle Blaze as an RM. Most times the tree or stump is no longer there. But on at least two occasions, I know I found the tree and yet could not recognize a Blaze or even a scar. I did find one on a Power Pole but that doesn’t count. One historian told me to look for a scar that looks like a cat’s face. Anyone have photos of these scars that could give me an idea of how they change with tree growth? Also, If you found an old scar, would you re-blaze it?

 

MS

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It depends on the type of tree, the age of the blaze, and perhaps the climate. I'll be interested to see what pictures people come up with.

 

From another forum here are some threads with pictures of very old marked trees (no triangles). It will give you some idea what they turn into, although most benchmark references will not be this old.

Pine, marked 1892

 

Juniper 1871

 

Live Oak 1938 and 1922

 

Another tree

 

1905 tree, corner stone

Edited by Bill93

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We've never found any tree RMS or tie-ins that we could really count on, so we're responding only to your last question, about re-blazing. Our gut feeling is that re-blazing should be done only by professionals. You might take a page from PFF's book and mark the tree with tape (though that too has its risks, folks with chainsaws having their ways of reading taped trees). But actual alteration of the bark seems to us like bringing stamping equipment along to freshen up a disk. Not for us.

 

By the way, we've greatly enjoyed your shots of older marks in the Oregon mountains.

 

Cheers,

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Bill93,

 

The two live oak markings are very enlightening. I don’t think I would have recognized those as a Bar-X blaze. Most of the blazes in my neck of the woods are on Oak, Maple, or Doug Fir.

 

m&h,

 

Thank you.

 

Re-blazing a tree is starting sound a little like vandalism to me, now that you mention it. I think I’ll put away my stamp freshening up kit too. :(

 

MS

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I found this blaze along with a stone drill mentioned in the description. Really surprised the wooden tower & mast were still standing. The buttons/washers on the mast still had the remains of red and white flutter flags under them. At 11,300 feet, one of my more memorable recoveries.

SCHOOLMARM MTN

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Very nice find 2/3 Marine. Maybe instead of re-blazing, I could carry some stone drills with me and drive … No, maybe not. It’s disconcerting to think that the SCHOOLMARM blaze and the Rockhounders’ blaze that Bill93 posted are about the same age. Life must be really tough above 11,000 feet in Colorado.

 

MS

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If the blazes on the trees only identify them as RMs, what's the problem with re-blazing them if time has caused the blaze to "heal up"? This doesn't seem to me to be anything like "restamping" a station mark. It only helps to identify a RM and has no "geodetic" significance.

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If the blazes on the trees only identify them as RMs, what's the problem with re-blazing them if time has caused the blaze to "heal up"? This doesn't seem to me to be anything like "restamping" a station mark. It only helps to identify a RM and has no "geodetic" significance.

 

The problem comes when a surveyor goes to the site and expects to see a blaze made at the time of the placement of the station. If that was in the early 50's for example and he finds a blaze that appears fresh and new, he may think that it is not the correct blaze and not use it if it is needed.

 

John

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I would only freshen a blaze if

-it was very difficult to see,

-the mark was hard enough to find that the blaze was important (reference ties inadequate without it),

-I had reconfirmed the measurement,

-My alteration would not cause the authenticity to be questioned (recovery notes must say I found and freshened it),

-I didn't consider the blaze itself of historical importance (e.g., an 1800's GLO bearing tree),

-and I wasn't worried about somebody being upset about damage to the tree.

 

That adds up to almost never.

Edited by Bill93

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here is one from 1934 (MIGS) on a Cedar

 

SonyPhotos013.jpg

 

From 1948 C&GS

RL0109_20041105_A.jpg

Edited by Z15

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Jerry Penry demonstrates the use of a timber scribe, which would have been the tool used for most lettering on trees and perhaps also the triangular blazes.

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Jerry Penry demonstrates the use of a timber scribe, which would have been the tool used for most lettering on trees and perhaps also the triangular blazes.

 

After watching Jerry Penry's demonstration of the timber scribe…

 

Why is it that, even though I have never needed to scribe letters into a tree, and probably will never have a genuine need to do so, I really want one of those tools?

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The same reason the tool companies sponsor Norm at the New Yankee Workshop. We like to play with neat toys that can accomplish things, even things we don't personally need to accomplish.

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