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Cemetery caches.


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I can imagine that there could be some cemetary hides done in poor taste, but I have never encountered any (out of the several dozen that I have found) Every cemetary is a bit different; public, private, old, new..

 

Imagine how you'd feel if you were visiting the grave of some dearly loved family member or friend, maybe recently departed, paying respects, praying, or whatever.....and a van pulls up nearby, parks & a band of yahoodies burst on the scene yukking it up & creating enough disturbance to rival a 76-piece brass band. Extreme comparison? Remember, this is Geocaching!! -- where "all's fair in love & glory"!!

 

I have seen that happen, only it wasn't cachers being the "yahoodies", it was a bunch of kids visiting their own relative's nearby grave. (yes, I was caching at the time and being respectful)

 

Many cemetaries are never visited and mostly forgotten after they are filled up with the passage of time. People's entire lives gone and forgotten except for a barely legible stone with their name on it. If I was buried in such a spot, I would be happy if anyone visited, yahoodies or not.

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The biggest issue to me is how the family views a recently departed's gravestone being used as a gamepiece.

Gleaning numbers/info off an old historical stone is way different than doing so from a more recent burial of a family member, where the family may still be in deep grief, especially if that family member was young.

Some families might approve; some might not. So perhaps in a case like this, permission to use the stone for information purposes would be warranted.

 

Otherwise I think cemetery caches are great - for all the reasons mentioned in the posts above. And until I actually experienced the situation that I described in a previous post, I had no qualms whatsoever about doing them. Now I'm just a little more selective.

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Zolgar has weird opinions to be warned.

 

Cemeteries mean nothing to him. There are empty husks in boxes buried 6 feet under ground. Big whoop! They're frelling DEAD. They don't care.

 

This does not mean Zolgar finds it acceptable to tromp willynilly through a cemetery and desecrate the area. Zolgar understands that these places mean a lot to those who have friends and family burried there, and thus he does not wish to disrespect these individuals. This leaves Zolgar with more respect for a cemetery than most would expect.

 

He does not, however, find cemetery caches to be disrespectful (in general). Quite the opposite he tends to see them as a good way to bring someone to the site.

Zolgar does not, though, support generic micros in a modern cemetery just placed for the sake of placing a cache in a cemetery.

Zolgar however strongly supports caches places in old cemeteries that history has forgotten.

He also supports caches places at cemeteries to draw special attention to certain individuals.

Though he does regret the fact that many cachers are just "There's a cache here!" and fail to notice the reason for the location.

 

Most importantly though, Zolgar supports each cachers right to choose how they cache. He will likely not place, or seek, a generic cemetery cache. But he will not tell people they cannot, or should not be able to, do them.

 

You seem to know a lot about Zolgar... tell him Hi next time you see him :)

 

Very well worded, and I think that you seem to have a good perspective on cemeteries.

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I think how we fear the dead shows a lot about our culture.

 

I'd call it something else, but it might offend some.

 

Zolgar has weird opinions to be warned.

 

Cemeteries mean nothing to him. There are empty husks in boxes buried 6 feet under ground. Big whoop! They're frelling DEAD. They don't care.

 

This does not mean Zolgar finds it acceptable to tromp willynilly through a cemetery and desecrate the area. Zolgar understands that these places mean a lot to those who have friends and family burried there, and thus he does not wish to disrespect these individuals. This leaves Zolgar with more respect for a cemetery than most would expect.

 

He does not, however, find cemetery caches to be disrespectful (in general). Quite the opposite he tends to see them as a good way to bring someone to the site.

Zolgar does not, though, support generic micros in a modern cemetery just placed for the sake of placing a cache in a cemetery.

Zolgar however strongly supports caches places in old cemeteries that history has forgotten.

He also supports caches places at cemeteries to draw special attention to certain individuals.

Though he does regret the fact that many cachers are just "There's a cache here!" and fail to notice the reason for the location.

 

Most importantly though, Zolgar supports each cachers right to choose how they cache. He will likely not place, or seek, a generic cemetery cache. But he will not tell people they cannot, or should not be able to, do them.

 

Posting in third person is so 1999. Regardless, I agree with Zolgar.

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I found a cache at a cemetery in East L. A. that was hidden in a hole under a tree. The container was a frog, because it had croaked. Get it? I enjoyed the humor of it and found it in no way to be disrespectful. It's a historic cemetery that is visible from a freeway and all my life I had been passing by it and 45 years later Geocaching brought me inside the gates: how cool. An interesting note; nearby the cache was a group of 50 or so markers and all of them were children who died at the age of one or two days old in 1941. I was inwardly inquisitive as to what killed all those babies in 1941? I had a hard time pulling myself away from the spot and will remember it for the rest of my life, all those tiny graves...

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Almost all land has had someone buried on it, at some point in history. If you found out that your house was a Native American Burial Ground 5,000 years ago, would you move? Probably not. For centuries, families buried their passed away loved ones on the family property and cemetaries were for folks who did not own land, were drifters or died far from home. I have to agree with many posters here in that some geocaches have brought me to cemetaries that I would have never known even existed. With died dates in the 1800s, I felt like I was reaching back in history. Cemetaries should not be a place of solemn morbidity, but instead, a place of remembrance and celebration. Although we miss our loved ones, we celebrate that we had them in our life at all. Western Culture has really done a disservice to death. We fear it. We loathe it. We try to avoid it. It is my belief that once we accept it and enjoy life EVERYDAY, then we will be a happier culture.

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We must have searched/found close to a dozen in cemetaries. They're always interesting places to visit. I can't help but say a prayer while we're there. It's always interesting to read stones along the way. I can think of two caches off the top of my head where we needed information on a stone to go to another stage of a multi. Placing one? Not sure about that.

Edited by VirginiaGator
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I did not attempt to find it but I did post a note stateing that I thought it was a poor place for a geocache.

 

Just wanted to thank you for being part of the heard that ruined geo-caching with all their whining about how we need more rules so as to abide by your personal opinions on what is/isn't acceptable.

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just wanted to thank YOU for another wasted post and keeping me amused watching you post in all these old topics. BTW, I see from your profile that you have been an active member for many years but only have 1 find since 2006. I guess somebody ruined caching for you so you don't go any more.

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I did not attempt to find it but I did post a note stateing that I thought it was a poor place for a geocache.

 

Just wanted to thank you for being part of the heard that ruined geo-caching with all their whining about how we need more rules so as to abide by your personal opinions on what is/isn't acceptable.

 

Man, what is with you today, anyway, M15a4spr? You show up here, almost two years since your last visit, and every one of your posts today (six, so far) has been combative. I don't see your older posts as being so critical of others. Just having a bad day?

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I think cementary is wrong, but the fact that many people like to go to old places , I think it would be acceptable if it is in an entrance or in the outside area of it. The same thing I don't like caches that are in the backyard of a property owner. But I agree that this caches lead you to new places , so It is acceptable the area not inside of the cemetary

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Depends on the cemetary.

Some are very open, and you can get around the outside and place them and stay out of the way. My personal preference would be to never approve a cache near or on graves. That is one quick way to get people upset. Gazebos, around the perimeter, info kiosks, they all need to be done with care.

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My last cemetary cache find was done last weekend around 3AM. It's sort of weird to notice all of the gravesites that have "settled" (coffins collapsed) over the years.

This was a pioneer cemetary that is still active. The last burial was about 3 years ago from what I saw and the oldest one I saw wasover 100 years ago. I only say it was a pioneer cemetary because that area didn't have a town anywhere near it 100 years ago. The cemetary was somewhat run down but without the cache there, nobody would have ever known it was there.

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Depends on the cemetary.

Some are very open, and you can get around the outside and place them and stay out of the way. My personal preference would be to never approve a cache near or on graves. That is one quick way to get people upset. Gazebos, around the perimeter, info kiosks, they all need to be done with care.

 

Personally, I have never seen one on a grave, and only one, by some cachers that put out a rash of inappropriate caches when they first started and before they disappeared from sight, that was even near a headstone. More often than not, they are in the arborvitae trees that seem to be ubiquitous in this area.

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Personally, I have never seen one on a grave, and only one, by some cachers that put out a rash of inappropriate caches when they first started and before they disappeared from sight, that was even near a headstone. More often than not, they are in the arborvitae trees that seem to be ubiquitous in this area.

Not quite the proper use of the word but I'll let it slide.

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Personally, I have never seen one on a grave, and only one, by some cachers that put out a rash of inappropriate caches when they first started and before they disappeared from sight, that was even near a headstone. More often than not, they are in the arborvitae trees that seem to be ubiquitous in this area.

Not quite the proper use of the word but I'll let it slide.

you clearly didn't.

 

Edit: I'm pretty sure that the word was used correctly.

Edited by mrbort
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Personally, I have never seen one on a grave, and only one, by some cachers that put out a rash of inappropriate caches when they first started and before they disappeared from sight, that was even near a headstone. More often than not, they are in the arborvitae trees that seem to be ubiquitous in this area.

Not quite the proper use of the word but I'll let it slide.

 

Thank you. That is so big of you. What, if you will, IS the proper use of the word? I'm soooo embarrased!

 

Oh, wait... excuse me!! Merrian-Webster seems to think that I used it correctly:

 

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Thank you. That is so big of you. What, if you will, IS the proper use of the word? I'm soooo embarrased!

 

Oh, wait... excuse me!! Merrian-Webster seems to think that I used it correctly:

 

 

More often than not, they are in the ubiquitous arborvitae trees that seem to be in this area.

 

I never said the definition was incorrect.

 

You are welcome.

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Thank you. That is so big of you. What, if you will, IS the proper use of the word? I'm soooo embarrased!

 

Oh, wait... excuse me!! Merrian-Webster seems to think that I used it correctly:

 

 

More often than not, they are in the ubiquitous arborvitae trees that seem to be in this area.

 

I never said the definition was incorrect.

 

You are welcome.

 

The way Chad's Pal said it was clearer and also correct. No digging your way out of this one. The way you rephrased it lends the uncertainty to the existence of the trees, placing emphasis on his competence; Chad's Acquaintance's post placed the uncertainty in the ubiquity of the trees, placing emphasis on his personal experience.

 

As to cemeteries, I think that one with historical significance to others than the friends/relatives of those interred there would be a great place for a respectful, tactful cache.

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The way Chad's Pal said it was clearer and also correct. No digging your way out of this one. The way you rephrased it lends the uncertainty to the existence of the trees, placing emphasis on his competence; Chad's Acquaintance's post placed the uncertainty in the ubiquity of the trees, placing emphasis on his personal experience.

 

As to cemeteries, I think that one with historical significance to others than the friends/relatives of those interred there would be a great place for a respectful, tactful cache.

 

You are correct mcbort. About the cemetaries.

Not so much on the other, OT thing.

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Thank you. That is so big of you. What, if you will, IS the proper use of the word? I'm soooo embarrased!

 

Oh, wait... excuse me!! Merrian-Webster seems to think that I used it correctly:

 

 

More often than not, they are in the ubiquitous arborvitae trees that seem to be in this area.

 

I never said the definition was incorrect.

 

You are welcome.

 

More often than not, they are in the arborvitae trees that seem to be ubiquitous constantly encoutered in this area.

 

Now, let's get this thread back on topic and not on my use of the English language, OK?

Edited by knowschad
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Depends on the cemetary.

Some are very open, and you can get around the outside and place them and stay out of the way. My personal preference would be to never approve a cache near or on graves. That is one quick way to get people upset. Gazebos, around the perimeter, info kiosks, they all need to be done with care.

 

Personally, I have never seen one on a grave, and only one, by some cachers that put out a rash of inappropriate caches when they first started and before they disappeared from sight, that was even near a headstone. More often than not, they are in the arborvitae trees that seem to be ubiquitous in this area.

 

I guess i should say on or around. A tree 5 feet away, or 15 feet would be too close for comfort for me. But in the shrubs around the edges. I would not approve one in an graveyard where people may walk around or on graves. Many consider that disrespectful.

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I love finding cemetery caches, especially in small, or old sections of the cemetery. I have only placed one cache but it is in the cemetery behind my complex in a section devoted to children. I placed it (well off to the side) there specifically because as I was roaming around looking at headstones I noticed this section was lacking in maitanence and could use the TLC of visitors. I make it a personal point to clear overgrown grass and brush dirt off the stones whenever I check on the cache. Personally, I think it is important to remember those who have gone before us, regardless of age, and to pay respects regardless of relationship. While it isnt everyones taste, I think if a cache is placed with respect, and treated with respect then there should be nothing wrong with it.

 

Thats just my two cents worth at least.

~Laura

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A new cache just went active in our area (S.W. Virginia) and the driving dirictions showed it to be on the roadside near a public cemetary but when I got to the cache site it was inside the cemetary. (Placed with permission of the grounds keeper) I knew that the cache was hard to find according to other logs and the bush that it is in looked like it had been muggled. I thought it was inconsiderate and disrespectful to place a cache inside a cemetary so I did not attempt to find it but I did post a note stateing that I thought it was a poor place for a geocache. I have found/logged geocaches near cemetarys, along the fences & ect. but I don't know of any that are inside of a cemetary. Then I got some emails (not from the cache owner) suggesting that I delete my note, which I did. I would like to hear input from fellow geocachers on this matter, thanks. :unsure:

 

Don't people realize that before cities had parks, cemeteries were used for picnics, strolls, and a day out with the family?

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I noticed that the people who are OK with cemetery caches (of which, I am also one) were careful to note "if they are respectful." I'm wondering what would constitute disrespectful? I think that if something would get someone's panties in a bunch, it would might be something just like this:

The container was a frog, because it had croaked. Get it? I enjoyed the humor of it and found it in no way to be disrespectful.

because the CO is "making light of" being dead. But... the poster says it wasn't at all disrespectful. (Personally, I also think it's clever and hilarious).

 

I tend to agree with:

Don't people realize that before cities had parks, cemeteries were used for picnics, strolls, and a day out with the family?

I used to set my telescope up in one particular cemetery when I was in college because it was on the top of a hill. However, the only way to get out of the treeline was to set up right on top of this one guy's grave. So, I'd introduce myself, ask permission to set up there, then go on ahead. From reading the thread, I'm sure some of you folks would find that appalling.

 

I love cemeteries, I love caches in cemeteries. I just can't seem to think what a CO could do that would be disrespectful. You have a inoffensive box filled with inoffensive things, that you're going to tuck under a bush or a bench or something. It's not like a CO is going to hang an inappropriately shaped micro around a statues neck, right?

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A new cache just went active in our area (S.W. Virginia) and the driving dirictions showed it to be on the roadside near a public cemetary but when I got to the cache site it was inside the cemetary. (Placed with permission of the grounds keeper) I knew that the cache was hard to find according to other logs and the bush that it is in looked like it had been muggled. I thought it was inconsiderate and disrespectful to place a cache inside a cemetary so I did not attempt to find it but I did post a note stateing that I thought it was a poor place for a geocache. I have found/logged geocaches near cemetarys, along the fences & ect. but I don't know of any that are inside of a cemetary. Then I got some emails (not from the cache owner) suggesting that I delete my note, which I did. I would like to hear input from fellow geocachers on this matter, thanks. :o

 

 

I don't think there is anything wrong with hiding a cache in a cemetary as long as it is done with approval, and respectful of where it is placed.

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A new cache just went active in our area (S.W. Virginia) and the driving dirictions showed it to be on the roadside near a public cemetary but when I got to the cache site it was inside the cemetary. (Placed with permission of the grounds keeper) I knew that the cache was hard to find according to other logs and the bush that it is in looked like it had been muggled. I thought it was inconsiderate and disrespectful to place a cache inside a cemetary so I did not attempt to find it but I did post a note stateing that I thought it was a poor place for a geocache. I have found/logged geocaches near cemetarys, along the fences & ect. but I don't know of any that are inside of a cemetary. Then I got some emails (not from the cache owner) suggesting that I delete my note, which I did. I would like to hear input from fellow geocachers on this matter, thanks. :(

 

I have placed caches just outside of cementarys "because" I love the calm and serenity and the sheer beauty of the places I have picked.

 

Tomato..tomatto....to each their own..

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Just my personal opinion here, with all due respect to all those before me.

 

The idea of placing a geocache in a cemetery is controversial enough that I think it should be avoided. You don't actually need to place the cache within the cemetery to lead people to it; there are usually plenty of spots bordering the cemetery that you can place the cache if you want to lead people to it, and in so doing you avoid possibly offending the sensitivity of those who have a problem with the idea.

 

As a cemetery is a place of respect and solemnity, it shouldn't be used as a gaming area. Place the cache nearby, and most cachers will complete the experience themselves by going in and paying their respects before they leave.

 

That, I think, is the best of both worlds.

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I guess I'm not adding much that hasn't been said before, but I definitely don't have a problem with caches in cemeteries. While we were up in Georgia we found a beautiful cemetery full of foxes. There were lots of graves from the civil war, and interesting headstones. I'd definitely would put up a cache there, if I lived close enough to maintain it.

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I saw a great cemetary the other day except it was under a freeway. It's as old as the town and was thinking of hiding a cache there but think it might be difficult to get it approved since the coords would literally be listed as the center lane of the Northbound lanes of Interstate 5.

 

I figure if they can build a freeway over a cemetary then hiding a geocache there certainly can't be more disrespectful.

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I will hunt cemetery caches, I would even place one, granting I got permission from the folks in charge. As long as it's done in a respectful manner, i.e. not near headstones, not in a manner to disrespect anyone or anything, go ahead. The only hard and fast rule I follow is never hunt one after dark. I have no desire to have run ins with local authorities, and in some areas local to us, being in a cemetery after dark is a sure way to do it.

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I will hunt cemetery caches, I would even place one, granting I got permission from the folks in charge. As long as it's done in a respectful manner, i.e. not near headstones, not in a manner to disrespect anyone or anything, go ahead. The only hard and fast rule I follow is never hunt one after dark. I have no desire to have run ins with local authorities, and in some areas local to us, being in a cemetery after dark is a sure way to do it.

 

I would ask all the residents if they cared. If I heard no complaints, I would place a cache. If one of the residents did speak up, I would simply wet my pants.

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Personally I feel that a toy box in a cemetery is not appropriate. I do however like going to older cemeteries and don't mind finding a micro. To throw a cache in every cemetery in your town I think is a bit crazy unless each one has something special to show. I recently found a cemetery just off the road, (40 or 50 feet) that has small trees growing throughout the graves. No grass anymore. All completely overgrown. Looks like it hasn't been maintained in at least 20 years. All the dates I saw were 1800's. I was looking over the headstones and one of the stones has a tie to Sir William Johnson. The IP takes you to the headstone but there is no cache there. Just the info you need to finish the mystery cache which leads to a physical container outside of the cemetery. I feel that the log that I left for people to sign would more appropriately be called a witness log. I did some research and found what I feel is a nice piece of local history and now I'm sharing it. To those who sign the log they first must witness what I bought them there to see. Just my opinion and I know that opinions are quite varied on this topic. Swizzle

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I will hunt cemetery caches, I would even place one, granting I got permission from the folks in charge. As long as it's done in a respectful manner, i.e. not near headstones, not in a manner to disrespect anyone or anything, go ahead. The only hard and fast rule I follow is never hunt one after dark. I have no desire to have run ins with local authorities, and in some areas local to us, being in a cemetery after dark is a sure way to do it.

 

I would ask all the residents if they cared. If I heard no complaints, I would place a cache. If one of the residents did speak up, I would simply wet my pants.

 

So let me get this straight: you'll place a cache on what could possibly be private property, knowing that you may or may not have permission to do so, and state those intentions on the forums? In such a manner that if a landowner, who had been properly contacted about placing a cache and was looking into our community could see, and decide we're just a bunch of thoughtless punks? Yet you, good sir, complain that the rest of the geocaching world is nothing but knuckleheads in other posts? Like I said earlier in this (or maybe a different) post: pot, meet kettle. Also, meet my ignore list.

 

If we are to sustain the future of this hobby/obsession/reason for living that we have, we have to be respectful of landowners, including groups that maintain cemeteries. I know right now, that if I were to run across a Mennonite cemetery, I would never place a cache there, nor would I even request permission to do so because of the conflicts with their beliefs. Respect for those whose property provide us a playing field and their rights and wishes does nothing but ensure our continued use of said property.

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I would ask all the residents if they cared. If I heard no complaints, I would place a cache. If one of the residents did speak up, I would simply wet my pants.

 

So let me get this straight: you'll place a cache on what could possibly be private property, knowing that you may or may not have permission to do so, and state those intentions on the forums? In such a manner that if a landowner, who had been properly contacted about placing a cache and was looking into our community could see, and decide we're just a bunch of thoughtless punks? Yet you, good sir, complain that the rest of the geocaching world is nothing but knuckleheads in other posts? Like I said earlier in this (or maybe a different) post: pot, meet kettle. Also, meet my ignore list.

 

 

(psssttt... I think he was kidding !!)

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So let me get this straight: you'll place a cache on what could possibly be private property, knowing that you may or may not have permission to do so, and state those intentions on the forums? In such a manner that if a landowner, who had been properly contacted about placing a cache and was looking into our community could see, and decide we're just a bunch of thoughtless punks? Yet you, good sir, complain that the rest of the geocaching world is nothing but knuckleheads in other posts? Like I said earlier in this (or maybe a different) post: pot, meet kettle. Also, meet my ignore list.

 

 

(psssttt... I think he was kidding !!)

 

What's that smell? SP?

 

Mr. Klinger is a newer member who has only been part of the game for a very short while. Coming in with the attitude he has is forgivable for ignorance is bliss, and Klinger appears a very happy person.

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