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Your First Aid Kit


Scooter Bill
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What do you carry in your first aid kit?

What do you need a first aid kit for?

 

All you need is a good length of rope, a knife, a towel and an extra pair of socks. That's not exactly what I'd call a first aid kit.

 

If you get hurt out in the woods, there is two types of "serious" injuries. Both mean you can't carry on by yourself. You either can't move on because you broke a bone, tore a muscle or some such. Nothing you find in a typical first aid kit will help with that. Or you suffer from some internal injury and will bleed to death internally ... good luck with that one.

 

Everything I have seen in a first aid kit so far can be replaced with a rope, a knife, or a towel (they miss socks badly). The number one disinfecting substance in the field (highly ignored unfortunately) is your own urine! You ever peed on a wound or peed into your hand and rubbed it on? Well, get used to the idea, because that is what you actually should do, unless mommy is carrying Neosporin around for you. It stings a bit. If you still have a fresh T-shirt (or a fresh sock), soak it with pee and press it onto the wound. Together with rope a piece of pee soaked T-shirt or half a sock will make a formidable band aid too.

 

If I'd be hiking in snake country, I might carry a snake bite kit. To my surprise, I haven't seen any bear bite kits or alligator bite kits around on the market lately. I always thought those are much more severe ... but then again ...

 

Jan

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What do you carry in your first aid kit?

What do you need a first aid kit for?

 

All you need is a good length of rope, a knife, a towel and an extra pair of socks. That's not exactly what I'd call a first aid kit.

 

If you get hurt out in the woods, there is two types of "serious" injuries. Both mean you can't carry on by yourself. You either can't move on because you broke a bone, tore a muscle or some such. Nothing you find in a typical first aid kit will help with that. Or you suffer from some internal injury and will bleed to death internally ... good luck with that one.

 

Everything I have seen in a first aid kit so far can be replaced with a rope, a knife, or a towel (they miss socks badly). The number one disinfecting substance in the field (highly ignored unfortunately) is your own urine! You ever peed on a wound or peed into your hand and rubbed it on? Well, get used to the idea, because that is what you actually should do, unless mommy is carrying Neosporin around for you. It stings a bit. If you still have a fresh T-shirt (or a fresh sock), soak it with pee and press it onto the wound. Together with rope a piece of pee soaked T-shirt or half a sock will make a formidable band aid too.

 

If I'd be hiking in snake country, I might carry a snake bite kit. To my surprise, I haven't seen any bear bite kits or alligator bite kits around on the market lately. I always thought those are much more severe ... but then again ...

 

Jan

Well, you haven't seen much have you? I don't have time to go into everything you haven't seen, but I will mention that there are several over the counter drugs that can have a big impact on your health (or others in you party) that can't be replaced with any of the items on your list - such as Benadryl (or a generic) for allergic reactions. BTW, I'm a MOFA instructor (Mountaineering Oriented First Aid).

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What do you carry in your first aid kit?

What do you need a first aid kit for?

 

All you need is a good length of rope, a knife, a towel and an extra pair of socks. That's not exactly what I'd call a first aid kit.

 

If you get hurt out in the woods, there is two types of "serious" injuries. Both mean you can't carry on by yourself. You either can't move on because you broke a bone, tore a muscle or some such. Nothing you find in a typical first aid kit will help with that. Or you suffer from some internal injury and will bleed to death internally ... good luck with that one.

 

Everything I have seen in a first aid kit so far can be replaced with a rope, a knife, or a towel (they miss socks badly). The number one disinfecting substance in the field (highly ignored unfortunately) is your own urine! You ever peed on a wound or peed into your hand and rubbed it on? Well, get used to the idea, because that is what you actually should do, unless mommy is carrying Neosporin around for you. It stings a bit. If you still have a fresh T-shirt (or a fresh sock), soak it with pee and press it onto the wound. Together with rope a piece of pee soaked T-shirt or half a sock will make a formidable band aid too.

 

If I'd be hiking in snake country, I might carry a snake bite kit. To my surprise, I haven't seen any bear bite kits or alligator bite kits around on the market lately. I always thought those are much more severe ... but then again ...

 

Jan

 

Whatever you say Rambo.

While I could build a fire, heat the knife and cauterize every injury I get while in the field, I much prefer a shot of triple antibiotic and a band-aid. Hiking out of the woods with no socks on my feet because I used them as bandages doesn't sound like a lot of fun either. While everything you said would be fine in a worst case scenario, its hardly ideal for every day injuries on the trail

 

I carry a small first aid kit in my camelback that I use for caching, biking and hiking. Ive got a couple small rolls of gauze, some tape, band aids of assorted sizes and shapes, butterflys, triple anti-biotic, tweezers, tick remover, a couple packets of Gu, matches, a lighter, flint and steel, some dryer lint in a ziplock, non-latex gloves, moleskin, alcohol wipes, 25' of 550 cord, ASPRIN!, a couple hand warmers (depending on the season) and a whistle clipped to the shoulder strap.

 

A small first aid kit can go a long way in letting you enjoy the rest of your day in the field, or having to cut it short and head home.

 

"Be Prepared"

Edited by FatPants
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Well, you haven't seen much have you? I don't have time to go into everything you haven't seen, but I will mention that there are several over the counter drugs that can have a big impact on your health (or others in you party) that can't be replaced with any of the items on your list - such as Benadryl (or a generic) for allergic reactions. BTW, I'm a MOFA instructor (Mountaineering Oriented First Aid).

Seen nothing at all. But you please tell me how I can tell which of those "over the counter" stuff is best for the "allergic symptom" you're just talking about. Or is your MOFA talk just something "generic"?

 

Jan

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I carry a small first aid kit in my camelback that I use for caching, biking and hiking. Ive got a couple small rolls of gauze, some tape, band aids of assorted sizes and shapes, butterflys, triple anti-biotic, tweezers, tick remover, a couple packets of Gu, matches, a lighter, flint and steel, some dryer lint in a ziplock, non-latex gloves, moleskin, alcohol wipes, 25' of 550 cord, ASPRIN!, a couple hand warmers (depending on the season) and a whistle clipped to the shoulder strap.

 

A small first aid kit can go a long way in letting you enjoy the rest of your day in the field, or having to cut it short and head home.

 

"Be Prepared"

And you took care of much more than a few blisters with that yet?

 

Jan

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Despite the McGyver solution above.......

 

I have a few First Aid Kits. The simplest of them is just for a day around town caching: several bandaids, butterflys, tweezers, alcohol wipes, a small roll of gauze, sissors, asprin and I added the benedryl.

 

For a bit more off the beaten path I added some larger bandaids, more gauze, triple atibiotic, string and an emergency blanket and poncho.

 

For out hiking - just add a little more of the above plus matches and a few other goodies.

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Sorry to have responded so seemingly Rambo or McGyver style.

 

I certainly appreciate a proper set of sterile bandages over "field solutions" at any rate. Maybe this should be a separate thread, along the lines of "what if you forgot to pack your usual first aid kit?".

 

What I do not appreciate is any kind of "generic over the counter" stuff that may cause allergic reactions by itself. Sure, in 90% of the cases it may be harmless ... but so is plain water.

 

Jan

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What do you carry in your first aid kit?

What do you need a first aid kit for?

 

All you need is a good length of rope, a knife, a towel and an extra pair of socks. That's not exactly what I'd call a first aid kit.

 

If you get hurt out in the woods, there is two types of "serious" injuries. Both mean you can't carry on by yourself. You either can't move on because you broke a bone, tore a muscle or some such. Nothing you find in a typical first aid kit will help with that. Or you suffer from some internal injury and will bleed to death internally ... good luck with that one.

 

Everything I have seen in a first aid kit so far can be replaced with a rope, a knife, or a towel (they miss socks badly). The number one disinfecting substance in the field (highly ignored unfortunately) is your own urine! You ever peed on a wound or peed into your hand and rubbed it on? Well, get used to the idea, because that is what you actually should do, unless mommy is carrying Neosporin around for you. It stings a bit. If you still have a fresh T-shirt (or a fresh sock), soak it with pee and press it onto the wound. Together with rope a piece of pee soaked T-shirt or half a sock will make a formidable band aid too.

 

If I'd be hiking in snake country, I might carry a snake bite kit. To my surprise, I haven't seen any bear bite kits or alligator bite kits around on the market lately. I always thought those are much more severe ... but then again ...

 

Jan

 

LOL! Awesome...now someday when I'm at work in the ER and someone comes in with a pee-soaked sock tied to their leg with rope, and everyone I work is laughing and wondering "WTH?"...I can walk in with great authority and say, "geocacher, huh?". :D I'll be a rockstar! Then, after we suture you up and discharge you, I'll probably take pity and sneak you a package of sterile 4X4s, some tape and some Neosporin so you don't have to worry if your Mom is with you with her's.

 

I carry the usual simple bandaging stuff, ABX ointment, Benedryl, and a couple of ACE wraps (pretty handy for stuff from sprains to a pressure dressing if someone nicks an artery). I also carry one of those little rolls of TP for camping, so I can empty my bladder and keep my socks dry. :laughing:

 

edited because duh....this is stargazer21. nycdancerboi is logged in on my computer...my bad. :blink:

Edited by nycdancerboi
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In addition to many of the things that come in a standard FAK, I also carry a small bottle of contact lens solution. In addition to needing it if I have to remove my contacts, it's a sterile saline solution and is very good for washing out wounds.

 

I guess you can think of it as synthetic pee.

 

I also carry a small tube of Super Glue. That comes in handy every now and then.

 

One of the best books I've read on survival kits/First Aid Kits is Cody Lundin's, "98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your a** Alive." Lundin recommends making your own kits rather than buying them.

 

The writing (and title for that matter) is a little gonzo, but I really appreciated the no-nonsense approach from a guy with some unique experiences.

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Don't feel like quoting, on the person poo-pooing over the counter medication...

Benedryl is EXTREMELY important to have in MOST situations. I've had to give benedryl to my dog on the fly when she started poofing up like a balloon. Nipped that in the bud. We also use it when anyone gets a bite of anything. My brother is extremely allergic to most things, and we're not interested in trying to open his swollen airway in-field with, perhaps, a knife and some rope. Benedryl all the way.

 

Steri-strips have also come in handy.

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What do you carry in your first aid kit?

What do you need a first aid kit for?

 

All you need is a good length of rope, a knife, a towel and an extra pair of socks. That's not exactly what I'd call a first aid kit.

 

If you get hurt out in the woods, there is two types of "serious" injuries. Both mean you can't carry on by yourself. You either can't move on because you broke a bone, tore a muscle or some such. Nothing you find in a typical first aid kit will help with that. Or you suffer from some internal injury and will bleed to death internally ... good luck with that one.

 

Everything I have seen in a first aid kit so far can be replaced with a rope, a knife, or a towel (they miss socks badly). The number one disinfecting substance in the field (highly ignored unfortunately) is your own urine! You ever peed on a wound or peed into your hand and rubbed it on? Well, get used to the idea, because that is what you actually should do, unless mommy is carrying Neosporin around for you. It stings a bit. If you still have a fresh T-shirt (or a fresh sock), soak it with pee and press it onto the wound. Together with rope a piece of pee soaked T-shirt or half a sock will make a formidable band aid too.

 

If I'd be hiking in snake country, I might carry a snake bite kit. To my surprise, I haven't seen any bear bite kits or alligator bite kits around on the market lately. I always thought those are much more severe ... but then again ...

 

Jan

 

This is a joke right? :laughing:

 

Snake bite kits don't work, the only time I would think of peeing on myself is the remote chance I got stung by a Jellyfish.

 

On topic,

 

After splitting my head open last weekend, during my trail repair event, I added high-absorbancy dressings to my first aid kit. I used 5 pieces of guaze when my head started bleeding.

 

An item that i've added to my kit is a single roll of Equine Vet wrap. Some items I consider invaluable in a first-aid kit are urushiol wipes and a bottle of hand sanitizer. Hand sanitizer is a good idea after using the bathroom. Most cases of camper's diarrhea comes from fecal bacteria on hands, not "bad water." Socks and rope are useless for urushiol removal. I guess you could pee on the sock. :D

Edited by Kit Fox
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In addition to many of the things that come in a standard FAK, I also carry a small bottle of contact lens solution. In addition to needing it if I have to remove my contacts, it's a sterile saline solution and is very good for washing out wounds.

 

I guess you can think of it as synthetic pee.

 

I also carry a small tube of Super Glue. That comes in handy every now and then.

 

One of the best books I've read on survival kits/First Aid Kits is Cody Lundin's, "98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your a** Alive." Lundin recommends making your own kits rather than buying them.

 

The writing (and title for that matter) is a little gonzo, but I really appreciated the no-nonsense approach from a guy with some unique experiences.

 

His other book is invaluable too! When all Hell breaks loose.

 

I own both books, and have read each twice.

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I carry a lot in my first aid kit.

 

pair of rubber gloves

space blanket

multiple bandages

triangle bandages

bandades

signal mirror

advil

snake bite kit

tapet

rope

 

Once I wetn hiking with my father in law and he asked what I carried in my backpack and I told him, he laughed and said why carry all that weight, you will never use it. Well He fell and kissed a rock on the ground 4 miles into the wood. Thank god I had my first aid kit. I used all of it. hs face was abloddy. I fixed him up and climed to the top of a mountain to get cell phone service and called for help, Thank god I had my GPS to give his Coords. EMS came and he his fine now, He told me I will never joke about you being as safe and caring all the saftey stuff again. I guess that tought him a lesson to be prepared for the worst. Be safe carry what you want and need.

Crazyway

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Used to carry WAY too much in addition to "pre-stocked" kits, anticipating all the "what ifs."

Amazing how much a fully stocked kit weighs.

Usually end up replacing all the unused, out-dated, dried up stuff regularly.

 

Lately I've whittled it down to:

1 regular bandaid

1 knuckle bandaid

1 fingertip bandaid

A small gauze patch

A piece of moleskin

A little duct tape

Super glue (little one-use type)

A couple anti diarrheal tablets

Many benedryl

Many ibuprofen

 

Fits in a tea bag tin.

Always have a knife, A.G. Russell's cool little tweezers and hand sanitizer on me, so don't need to double it in the kit.

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Having been a licensed EMT I...

 

Carry at all times:

 

Current CPR and First Aid Training (Think about having an Event Cache for training)

 

Protective nonlatex gloves

Breathing barrier (Mask - with one-way valve)

Blood Stopper bandage

 

-

 

Try to carry at all times:

Adhesive bandages (Having run first aid stations this is the number one supply)

Antibiotic ointment packets

2 triangular bandages (The McGyver of bandages)

Tweezers

EMT Scissors

Water

Sterile Gauze Bandages

Medical tape

 

From there we'd have to talk about proper training concerning:

Glucose (real (simple) sugar of some kind)

Baby Aspirin

Benadryl

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Despite the McGyver solution above.......

 

I have a few First Aid Kits. The simplest of them is just for a day around town caching: several bandaids, butterflys, tweezers, alcohol wipes, a small roll of gauze, sissors, asprin and I added the benedryl.

 

For a bit more off the beaten path I added some larger bandaids, more gauze, triple atibiotic, string and an emergency blanket and poncho.

 

For out hiking - just add a little more of the above plus matches and a few other goodies.

 

The standard 100 and something kit out of Walmart makes me feel comfortable. I guess I should pack a sanitary napkin in case I cut my hand off, or something, but to be serious, if I cut my hand off, how and I going to pee on it before application?

 

I also pack matches, lighter, glow sticks, emergency blanket, ace bandages, bungee cords, tick tweezers, a Sawyer B6B Extractor Snake Bite/Bee Sting Kit, and a small, mouth to mouth/cpr barrier mask. Oh, bandannas. Any good Boyscout can tell you about the multiple uses of bananas.

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I try to carry no more than I will actually use. To wit:

 

Goo or Cliff Shots (first on the list for a reason)

Tweezers

Technu

Advil

A couple of Vicodin

Bic lighter

Folding knife

Lightweight rain poncho

 

I don't carry bandages as duct tape will work just fine until I can get better medical attention.

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Here's what is in my first aid bag:

 

Top Compartment

  • 1 Combitube

Inside Compartments

 

  • 1 1-inch tape
  • 2 adjustable cervical collars
  • 1 Adult BVM
  • 2 Quick clip straps
  • 2 Face masks
  • 2 4-inch roll gauze
  • 2 5x9 gauze
  • 2 non-adhering dressing
  • 6 4x4 gauze
  • 10 billing forms (for ambulance calls)

Airway compartment

 

  • 1 non-rebreather mask
  • 1 Nasal Canulla
  • 1 Pocket mask
  • 1 manual suction
  • 1 set of Oral Airways
  • 1 set of nasal airways
  • 4 sets of gloves

IV Kit

 

  • 1 500cc of Sodium Chloride
  • 1 3cc syringe
  • 1 14ga Catheter
  • 1 16ga catheter
  • 2 18ga catheter
  • 2 20ga catheter
  • 1 22ga catheter
  • 1 24ga catheter
  • 1 1-inch tape
  • 1 IV starter kit
  • 1 10 drop IV tubing
  • 4 tegaderm
  • 1 hotpack/coldpack

Left pocket

 

  • 1 stethescope
  • 1 adult BP cuff

Right Pocket

 

  • 2 safety glasses
  • 1 small sharps container

Front Pocket

 

  • SPO2
  • Glucometer
  • 1 trauma shears
  • 1 eye wash
  • 1 hand sanitizer
  • 4 tongue depressors
  • flashlight

Front Pocket Removable Pouch

 

  • Thermometer
  • Band-aids (Various)
  • Finger Splints
  • Blood barriers (large pads to soak up blood from getting onto other things)
  • Nose bleed plug
  • Various other small items

 

 

 

mb5107_protraumaghost-split.jpg

 

Admittedly, I don't go off into the woods with this very often as it's pretty bulky and heavy, but I have it in the back of my SUV and have used it numerous times (as both normal first aid and on accident/rescue scenes with the ambulance). It does convert to a backpack with straps located in a zippered rear pocket (which you can't see in this picture).

Edited by Nathan Wert
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This thread has made me think about what I don't have. My wife is alergic to fire ants, so we need her epi-pen. There is a whole list of things I need to add beyond the bandaids I have.

 

Thanks for the serious posts and even then tongue in cheek posts. They all made me think back on my BSA training.....be prepared!

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Great thread! After I stopped laughing, I went through my first aid kit. I bought one at Walmart. It has a lot of stuff in it, for twelve bucks, and the only thing I added was some butterfly closures, an ace bandage, small multi tool and glucose tablets(yea, I'm one of those). On the down side, it's made in China and everything probably has lead or melamine in it.

 

As for:

 

All you need is a good length of rope(belt), a knife(k-bar/bayonet), a towel and an extra pair of socks(anything that soaks up blood) and yes, even urine(sterile liquid) as a last resort.

 

That's battlefield first aid - it's works, until the corpsman get to you. At least that's the way it was when I was in.

Edited by Jedediah Smith
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