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Keeping up with multiple finds in a day


Winstonsdad
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I did a search and it did not find any results, so here goes.

 

When you folks are caching for a day and find several caches, how do you keep track of them during the day? Do you carry a log with you? Do keep up with them in your GPS? How do you keep from getting confused on which cache you found so you can log them when you get to your computer?

 

Along that lines, do you set out with a specific list of caches you are going after when you start the hunt? What happens when you find everything you had on your list and there is still time left to hunt?

 

these may be silly questions or may be posted in the wrong spot, but I am curious!

 

Thanks in advance

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I have a 60CSX and use the geocaching feature to keep track. When I find a cache I click on "found" and an entry goes in my calendar for that day. When I get home I look at the calendar which shows a list of all the caches I found and in the order I found them.

 

The only thing I don't like is that it doesn't keep track of DNFs, so I have to write those down.

 

Before the 60 I used Cachemate and just moved the unfound caches to a found cache bucket.

 

BC (Before Cachemate) I simply wrote them down on a piece of paper.

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Usually, I only go out with a plan so I know the order of caches I'm going to do, if there are parking/trailhead/etc coordinates for quicker routing. I keep that paper with me, mark finds/dnfs/etc as well as a quick note (much like field notes on some of the newer GPSrs). These notes help remind me so I can write a log more than TFTC.

 

I almost always have a list when I go. I almost always over plan and don't usually run out of time. My suggestion to you would be to make two sized circles when you plan. A short route with what you think you can do with the time you have and a longer one which you would love to do if you had enough time. About the middle of the day, decide if you can keep going further or if you need to stop going and start working on the stuff on the way home.

 

Remember, the closer stuff is, well, closer so easier to get next time.

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Very interesting topic and I'm glad you brought it up. I'm still trying to come up with a perfect system for myself. So far I've relied on memory, and since I haven't done more than a dozen caches in a day (including DNF) it has not been a problem.

 

When it is time to log, I call up the map view and log them in order I found (or did not find) them.

 

What would be ideal (for me) right now is if there is the ability to pull up the calendar from my GPSr, and then open those cache pages automatically for logging.

 

The newer eTrex (I use Venture HC) has the calendar feature as well mentioned by briansnat. I have Cachemate on a Palm as well, but find it awkward to log using it. I don't even mark a cache as found in Cachemate, only in my GPSr.

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I use Cachemate in my PDA phone.

 

When I make a find, I tick off the "found" in the "log" section and I bookmark it in Cachemate - that will sort all the found caches.

 

I also put a number before the cache name in the PDA... that way I can keep track of the order.

 

So...

 

Gizmo's Cache becomes 1 Gizmo's Cache

Zoe's Cache becomes 2 Zoe's Cache

 

And so forth. Then when I'm logging I can open Cachemate and see the order they are in - because while I have a good memory, it's short!

 

Jenn

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Memory still works for the most part. On my Colorado, I use the Caches_Found.txt file as well as my camera to fill in the voids. Oh.. don't forget previous logs on the cache page. That can serve well to stimulate the memory.

Sums up my method very well. Exept I use either my Oregon or my Colorado. Usually just a line or less of field text to jog my memory when I am home.

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I use technology and paper at the same time. I have geocaches listed as POIs (Points of Interest) so I can't log them as found with the time and date. I carry a PDA to read full descriptions (when needed). After having a PDA (old Palm IIIXE) crash twice I don't log my find using cachemate. I still prefer to manually write down each waypoint code of found caches on paper or a notepad. If I need to, I can jot down important notes for each cache. I recently did a 7 hour hike and found 18 caches, and I could remember vivid details for every cache I found. After about 20 finds, the caches start to run together on me.

 

This is an expensive option, but some geocachers have resorted to digital recorders to make voice notes of each cache they found.

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Cachemate on my palm. The logs are in chronological order. Since I'm not a real wordy log writer, three or four sentences at most, I just write the log in the field. When I get home I hot sync the PDA and run cachematelogging.gsk with GSAK. The caches are then logged in correct order with the log I wrote when I was done with the field. Saves the brain for other functions.

 

Jim

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I have my GPSr with POI's loaded. As I find caches I log them down in my handy dandy notebook. I log the name, geonumber, date, time (if it's an FTF), and any TB's I drop. When I get home I use the notebook to reference the geonumber for logging. I try to keep it as simple as possible. :lol:

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Not silly questions at all, and certainly posted in the right place.

 

I too use the calendar feature on to 60C like Brian, but instead of going longhand for my DNF's I edit the notes field to reflect the DNF, and then mark it as found so it will show on the calendar. I don't carry a PDA, but use the notes feature in my Ipod nano for the listings, so I can't write to it. One of my regular caching pals carries a pen sized digital voice recorder on the bigger runs to help remember features on truly memorable caches or something that is log-worthy.

 

Most times I set out with a route that contains more caches than I will probably get to, and I try to design them with the potential to take short cuts and leave clusters or loops out if time is running out. But other times I just set out in the direction of a few targeted caches, and then hit 'next closest' after that. I'm fortunate to live in a very cache dense area, with 5-6 other active areas less than 2 hours away.

 

And I always have the 500+ closest to home loaded in the GPS in case I get out of work early enough to detour past a cache or three on the way home. :lol:

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I have a 60CSX and use the geocaching feature to keep track. When I find a cache I click on "found" and an entry goes in my calendar for that day. When I get home I look at the calendar which shows a list of all the caches I found and in the order I found them.

 

 

Yep, same here. GPS 60 series, and it goes into a handy dandy calender for that day. It's not all it's cracked up to be though, I sometimes will mark them as found twice, or even mark them as found by hitting the wrong button as I'm arriving on site. And I have DNF'd some of those. :lol:

 

Most I ever found in one day is 23, so I never have a problem remembering them anyways. I think a few rare times when I found several caches by the same hider in the same park or along the same trail, I might have had a little trouble distinguishing which one is which, but I believe reading the logs for the cache took care of that every time.

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Now that I've maxed out really close caches and drive 50 minutes into the city I take some time to plan. Driving in random circles is a waste of time. I plan which road I want to take in and list caches just off that road. Once you get to the city have a certain space you'd like to search (downtown, southeast sector, something like that) I plan at least 20 (more if most look like P&G's). Basically this is all done by just looking at the map and seeing where a good density of caches are and planning a quick, easy, and efficient route between these are. I write down some general directions (Broad River (5 caches) turn onto whatever St (3 caches) hit the Seven Oaks park (3 caches),etc).

 

Between caches I have a little memo book in the car that I scribble down one word names for each cache that I find. If there was something important I take note of it there. Memory works pretty well, but it's easier for me to write logs when I can keep caches in order.

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On my Oregon I start a new track, and record as I go along. Then looking at the track on the map I can see what order I did the caches. On the map there are different icons for found and DNFs.

 

Funny, when I see a lot of 'scribble' when zooming in, I know it was a difficult cache to find. :lol:

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I have a Germin E-trex Venture

I use to do by memory and it works out good, But it gets harder with 10 plus. I've use my routes feature, by having two headings found and DNF. If I found/DNF I pick the route and click on the blank spot, waypoint and the click on nearest and bam, founds/dnf in order and it gives me a list of caches that i need to delete out of my memory. Nice thing is when I erase the cache from my cache list it will also take it out of my routes for me.

I use to go paper but now I do it by memory. Now I find a cache then I click for the next nearest and go from there. It get to be fun sometimes but sometimes it gets to be time consuming, kind of a treasure hunt before the cache hunt. :( If I think a need notes, it goes on a half sheet of paper and that's it.( car floor was getting quite full). :DB)

Hope it helps.

Sullude

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I have a 60CSX and use the geocaching feature to keep track. When I find a cache I click on "found" and an entry goes in my calendar for that day. When I get home I look at the calendar which shows a list of all the caches I found and in the order I found them.

 

Cool, nice. I have this same GPSr and haven't explored it's features. Thanks [:D]

 

I keep that paper with me, mark finds/dnfs/etc as well as a quick note (much like field notes on some of the newer GPSrs). These notes help remind me so I can write a log more than TFTC.

 

I do something along the same lines. I like having the paper print-off (first page and sometimes thru 3rd page) with me in the car. I make quick notes about the caching experience to help write the online logs later.

 

As for the other aspects; I know my caching speed, the average number of caches I can hunt for in an hour. That number ranges from 2-3 for tradisional caches. If they are really stacked close to one another, obviously I can hunt for more in 60 minutes. I assume more time for multis and puzzles that I have to work on in the field, but I usualy plan those for last. I give myself a rough amount of time in hours that I am going to be out caching and multiply X2 or 3, add a little travel time to get to the first cache too.

I also print out the map(s) page and use the individual cache's name as initials written on the map(s). I don't plan on hitting them in any order, just heading out and starting, usually with the one that is closest, or furthest from home. I do try not to back track, the map print off help with this.

 

I also note the order on each printed page for the caches in which I hunted for them.

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Most of the time I keep a notepad on my dashboard and when I get back in the car the first thing I do is write down the name of the cache just found (or not found) and anything memorable about it. I also have a PDA that I sometimes use for capturing comments but just writing them on paper is quicker for me and I can keep everything in order.

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I take lots of pictures. Digital photos are cheap B) so I try to take pictures of every cache, even LPC's. If I'm finding waymarks to create, I try and take a photo of the gps with coords on it so I never lose them.

 

When I come home, I can look through the pictures and I have instant memory triggers of everywhere I've been and everything I've done. Plus, I've got pictures to post for everything which I think is important.

 

Even if I take lots of time posting my find (months), I'm right back at the cache when I look at the pictures again, which is also nice just for general memories. It's saved my butt many many times. :D:(

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My protocol:

I use CacheMate on my Palm PDA.

When I find a cache, I note the time/date found (which can be set to be automatic). I may write relevant notes about trades or the condition of the cache if there is a problem.

Found caches are automatically moved to the 'HUNTED' category I created. (another setting that is user-selectable)

If I DNF a cache, I set the time I decide to move on, and manually move the listing to the 'HUNTED' category.

At the end of the day, I Export my logs for the 'HUNTED' category to Palm memos, and I have the export function set to 'add time to the log memo title'.

After hot-syncing the palm with the home computer, I open the memos using the Palm desktop application, and sort by the memo title, which in effect sorts the records according to the time I found (or DNFed) the cache.

 

Now all my activities are neatly sorted in chronological order. :D

 

I can then open each memo individually to see my notes, and I can copy the waypoint ID for pasting into my browser as I log my results for the day. Of course, any other relevant notes are also available to be copy/pasted, or to jog a memory of what happened at the cache.

 

I also keep an Excel spreadsheet for all my finds, but that's a separate issue.

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I take a small notebook to write down details, particularly (since I often cache with children) what we took and what we left. And take pictures with my digital camera of most sites. We're not a high volume caching family with only 1 to 3 caches on most excursions. It was a bit challenging logging the 14 finds from our recent California trip (yeah, I hear you folks who routinely find 20+ in a day laughing) so I was very glad to have actually written down some of the details.

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I use CacheMate on my Palm PDA.

When I find a cache, I note the time/date found (which can be set to be automatic).

 

You learn something new every day. I saw the date/time thingy on Cachemate on my PDA but didn't realize I could just hit one button to get the current info and never bothered to check that. Just fired up my own PDA and realized it takes 2 keystrokes. SWEET!

 

Thanks - that helped me :D

 

Jenn

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When I'm paperless, I take notes on my Palm PDA. That includes the order in which I found the caches, which TBs were found/dropped in which caches, which sig items I traded for at which caches, etc.

 

When I'm using paper cache description pages, I note both the date and time of the find on the cache's page, in addition to the other info (TBs, sig items, etc.). When I log the caches online, I can reconstruct the order based on the dates and times.

 

Of course, the most I've ever found in one day was 10 caches, so YMMV...

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I also use CacheMate on a Palm M515, and use a 60csx. I 'bookmark' every cache I hunt in CacheMate. If I find it, in the log I mark it as found with time/date (I also mark it found on the 60csx). If I DNF, I just mark the date. At home, I hotsync and use a macro to load the bookmarked caches back into GSAK marking them Found or DNF - the macro also sorts them and numbers them, with the DNF's at the end. I then write the logs in GSAK and use another macro to step thru the list and log the caches, after which it moves the found caches to my FINDS db.

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Memory still works for the most part. On my Colorado, I use the Caches_Found.txt file as well as my camera to fill in the voids. Oh.. don't forget previous logs on the cache page. That can serve well to stimulate the memory.

Me too - except that memory thing. I use the same method. Field notes work well for me; easy to do and the fact that it posts the comments to the cache page is gravy.

 

I did use a 60CS and PDA for a long time. I did not add comments to the PDA, although our caching partners did and often beamed them over to mine. I kept notes for each cache on the bottom of maps I printed out.

 

We still use the maps for planning and changing course in the field. They give a general overview of a number of caches. As we go along, we often revise our route. The GPS screen shows a number of caches, but there is nothing like a 8 x 11 map. Last weekend we did some wandering in an area with a number of trails branching off so I made some Google Earth prints as well.

 

MM - We will be in LV next month and I hope to find some more of your fine caches.

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Thanks for all the replies. I have learned a lot. I have not loaded that many caches in my 60CSx, but will. I work 50 miles from home, so I cache at work on my lunch break and cache on the way home, if I have time. I think what I will do is load a lot of caches for both locals and supplement that with notes in my little black book.

 

I think what a lot have said is they use a combo of technology, memory and paper notes. That is basically what I have been doing, but have not loaded enough caches in my GPS.

 

I am learning! Thanks again for the replies and happy caching everybody!!

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When you folks are caching for a day and find several caches, how do you keep track of them during the day? Do you carry a log with you? Do keep up with them in your GPS? How do you keep from getting confused on which cache you found so you can log them when you get to your computer?

We keep a journal. Not only does it provide for writing down which caches I've found, but also DNFs, DNBs, descriptions of the caches, anything interesting we saw, puzzle clues found, etc. etc. Also, keep the information about the cache we place, too.

 

We don't do it religiously and sometimes don't have the journal with us, so the history is not complete or spans several notebooks or loose pages.

 

Oh, and don't look up you cache in our journal as you might not like what you read. These are private journals and not the public information like logs on this site.

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Most of the time I keep a notepad on my dashboard and when I get back in the car the first thing I do is write down the name of the cache just found (or not found) and anything memorable about it.

This is what I've been doing for several years, after PDA crashes wiped out all records for multiple caching roadtrips. I switched from a PDA to a car laptop. But, I use the laptop for reading, reference and maps -- not for typing in the car. I don't want to waste time typing in the car when scribbling the cache ID and a few keywords takes so little time. I've never lost my pad.

 

A typical entry would read: "GC12345 Memorial Park cache Quick find, POS, log damp, took UN TB." This is enough to permit me to write a 100 word log several days later.

 

These cryptic reminders are similar to how others use the Field Notes feature. Now that I have an iPhone, I am going to try the Field Notes feature on my upcoming Spring Break caching roadtrip. Let's see if it's more efficient than my sprial bound steno pad.

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I do many of the things others have suggested, just depends on the time I have to prep and how much of a rush I'm in when caching.

 

1. Use a notepad and write the caches I've visited with notes to help me write more than "TFTC" in the logs - most reliable and generally least preparation - though I've forgotten to take a notepad and had to resort to the back of a receipt or whatever paper I've got in my car.

 

2. Mark the caches found on 60Cx as I find them - no way to mark the DNFs however and sometimes I forget to hit the found button (or I hit it by mistake).

 

3. Create a track on 60Cx. Then I can seen which caches I went by. Sometimes you can even see where you were wandering around searching for a cache.

 

4. Use Cachemate and record field notes for each cache. This takes too much time in the field generally but saves a lot of time logging the caches later using GSAK.

 

5. If I prep, I have a list of caches I plan on finding printed out in order and can write notes on this.

 

6. If I'm not doing too many caches I can generally remember which I've found - but I use method 2 or 3 to check.

 

Thanks for all the replies. I have learned a lot. I have not loaded that many caches in my 60CSx, but will. I work 50 miles from home, so I cache at work on my lunch break and cache on the way home, if I have time. I think what I will do is load a lot of caches for both locals and supplement that with notes in my little black book.

I too work nearly 50 miles from my home. I use a cache along a route query to get the caches between home and work and load that into my GPS and into Cachemate on my PDA so I can stop and find caches when I have time. On the weekend, I erase those waypoints and load caches in whatever area I'm going to go caching in. Usually I go hiking on the weekend.

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Most of the time I keep a notepad on my dashboard and when I get back in the car the first thing I do is write down the name of the cache just found (or not found) and anything memorable about it.
This is what I've been doing for several years, after PDA crashes wiped out all records for multiple caching roadtrips. I switched from a PDA to a car laptop. But, I use the laptop for reading, reference and maps -- not for typing in the car. I don't want to waste time typing in the car when scribbling the cache ID and a few keywords takes so little time. I've never lost my pad. ...
A long time ago, I kept a notebook to record my finds. It served me well until I was on a road trip in your neck of the woods and lost it. I was able to log most of my finds from memory, but still missed a few. As I recall, you pointed one of my missed finds out to me a year or two later.

 

Since then, I started using a little geocaching database application on my pda called Cache Log Book. It lets me quickly record all important info about my cache hunts.

Cache-Log-Book.gif

Edited by sbell111
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This is interesting. My caching buddy loves the paper and refuses to go paperless, so if I'm with her she has all the cache pages printed that we might do.

 

I'm, shall we say, frugal and don't want to waste expensive printer ink on needless printing, much less wasted paper, so if I'm caching with a group, I'll plan a route, and in a Word document I'll make a quick and dirty list, something like this:

 

Name of Cache

GCXXXX

d/t size of cache

hints if available, or any pertinent info (walk ten feet from the forked tree...etc)

 

I can usually get 20-30 on one sheet of paper if I do two columns.

 

That leaves room for notes (wet log, great view, etc) to help me remember what to put in the log.

 

When I get back in the car I just write a quick "F" or "DNF" next to the info and any notes I want to remember.

 

I load the coords into my GPS, so the GC number is very helpful from the list.

 

Oh, and I email the list to the participants, so they can print what they want or add any notes they feel they need.

 

edited to add: I used to use a PDA, but found I didnt really like it. The battery would die at the most inopportune moment, or the sorting would take too long, just didn't work for me. Maybe I need a newer one.

Edited by TMDMom
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edited to add: I used to use a PDA, but found I didnt really like it. The battery would die at the most inopportune moment, or the sorting would take too long, just didn't work for me. Maybe I need a newer one.
I bet that you would like a newer model. Better batteries, more memory and faster processors go a long way to fix the problems that you cited. Also, when I am out on a log day caching, I'll plug my pda in if I am in the car for more than just a couple of minutes.
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If I'm going for more than a half dozen or so I usually just jot down the cache names on a slip of paper as I find/DNF. I can usually remember enough once I'm home to type up a decent log, but I should probably start jotting some notes for each as I go. Big days for me (10+) can get muddy.

 

I do use a Colorado so I should really start using the 'log find' feature. It's probably one of those things that once I start using I'll wonder why I didn't start months ago.

 

I keep all findable caches within 50 miles of home on my GPSrs so if I work through the caches I plan to tackle and have more time, I just see what is close and looks good. :D Often I just look for a location that has a good density and figure I'll work out which to go for on site.

 

I tried the paper thing for my first dozen finds or so, but it just takes so freaking long to prepare and you can't go for any 'caches of opportunity' outside of your plan. Well worth buying something to break away from paper IMO.

Edited by wubbh
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edited to add: I used to use a PDA, but found I didnt really like it. The battery would die at the most inopportune moment, or the sorting would take too long, just didn't work for me. Maybe I need a newer one.
I bet that you would like a newer model. Better batteries, more memory and faster processors go a long way to fix the problems that you cited. Also, when I am out on a log day caching, I'll plug my pda in if I am in the car for more than just a couple of minutes.

 

you're probably right. I had a freebie hand me down (see previous post...me...frugal) but maybe I'll get a new one for my birthday.

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I tried the paper thing for my first dozen finds or so, but it just takes so freaking long to prepare and you can't go for any 'caches of opportunity' outside of your plan. Well worth buying something to break away from paper IMO.

 

I don't think it takes that long to prepare, but I also have lots loaded into my gpsr, so I would have coords for the unplanned excursions. The only problem I have with that is if I don't have the paper (or PDA, previously) then I won't know if what I'm going to is just parking coords and I have to do something to find the cache other than follow my gpsr.

 

I guess I do need a new pda. I already have GSAK and Cachemate, so I might as well fix that situation.

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I did a search and it did not find any results, so here goes.

 

When you folks are caching for a day and find several caches, how do you keep track of them during the day? Do you carry a log with you? Do keep up with them in your GPS? How do you keep from getting confused on which cache you found so you can log them when you get to your computer?

 

Along that lines, do you set out with a specific list of caches you are going after when you start the hunt? What happens when you find everything you had on your list and there is still time left to hunt?

 

these may be silly questions or may be posted in the wrong spot, but I am curious!

 

Thanks in advance

 

Get someone like they have on some of the quiz shows "call a friend" so you can call and have them find you some more.

 

I am in Missouri and have been known to call my brother in south Texas to look something up on Groundspeak for me.

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I used to use a PDA, but found I didnt really like it. The battery would die at the most inopportune moment, or the sorting would take too long, just didn't work for me. Maybe I need a newer one.

You probably used Cachemate, right? I didn't like for that very reason. I reverted to exporting as HTML and using Plucker. Today, though I now have a T|X, I still use the same scheme, just different programs: GSAK and iSilo.

 

If I were to do it today, I'd probably go with an iPod Touch and iSilo. The differences between the Palm and Touch are such that I would not be concerned with them--there's no Killer App for either in my world. The Touch though would eliminate the need for a separate iPod--which I have--and is a lot smaller unit. Plus, it's got a better screen for the outdoors. OTOH, if I were taking a lot of notes in the field and wanted to put it in an electronic device I'd stick with the Palm because of the hand writing recognition.

 

The reason I like exporting to HTML is I have control over the layout and all of the grunt work is done on the desktop. There are static indexes of nearest to various towns and locations, by waypoint, cache name, and owner names. Plus each cache page has a list of the 5 nearest unfound caches.

 

That said, I do stick with a journal for recording my experiences.

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I tried the paper thing for my first dozen finds or so, but it just takes so freaking long to prepare and you can't go for any 'caches of opportunity' outside of your plan. Well worth buying something to break away from paper IMO.

 

I don't think it takes that long to prepare, but I also have lots loaded into my gpsr, so I would have coords for the unplanned excursions. The only problem I have with that is if I don't have the paper (or PDA, previously) then I won't know if what I'm going to is just parking coords and I have to do something to find the cache other than follow my gpsr.

 

I guess I do need a new pda. I already have GSAK and Cachemate, so I might as well fix that situation.

 

I think part is that I would obsessively over prepare and end up printing out the entire cache page (maybe with a few logs) for each cache I planned to tackle. :D If I hadn't been able to go paperless early I'm sure I would have streamlined the approach, but it was taking me over an hour to prep for a dozen caches.

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Like others have mentioned I use the tracklog from my 76C to see which caches and the order I found them. In the field I'm usually too impatient to get moving on to the next cache to make notes so I use a voice recorder to note things items traded and details to mention in the log. I can record while I'm moving between caches. As long as I remember to mention the cache name I'm golden when I get home even after a multi day trip.

 

I priced out different types of recording devices and ended up with a cheap MP3 player. I can leave it on pause between caches and a single AAA battery will last all day.

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I did a search and it did not find any results, so here goes.

 

When you folks are caching for a day and find several caches, how do you keep track of them during the day? Do you carry a log with you? Do keep up with them in your GPS? How do you keep from getting confused on which cache you found so you can log them when you get to your computer?

 

Along that lines, do you set out with a specific list of caches you are going after when you start the hunt? What happens when you find everything you had on your list and there is still time left to hunt?

 

these may be silly questions or may be posted in the wrong spot, but I am curious!

 

Thanks in advance

 

Get someone like they have on some of the quiz shows "call a friend" so you can call and have them find you some more.

 

I am in Missouri and have been known to call my brother in south Texas to look something up on Groundspeak for me.

 

Funny you say "call a friend". I called my wife yesterday to help me on a cache. Her first response when I asked if she was at the computer was "are you out caching?" Busted!! Guilty as charged!

 

She uses her iPhone to find new caches or look up the hints. It has come in handy on more than one occasion.

 

thanks again to everybody for your responses. You are most helpful.

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I have a great system. I mark the cache as found on my Colorado when my boyfriend and I find it. When we get home, he'll pull the information off of it and log all of his finds. Then a month or two later, I search the gc page using the "Found By" field and put his name in, and then figure out which ones I was present for, and then struggle to remember them to write about. Some are a lot easier than others B)

 

He goes w/out me more than I go w/out him. When I'm out by myself, I usually move slower, and place a few, so it's easier to just remember them. Or look at the log on the Colorado.

 

Maybe I'll get better at logging. As of last night I'm finally up to date. I went on a month-long roadtrip over the summer, and had so much to log when I got back, that it threw me off completely.

 

But the "search for boyfriends caching name" method is definitely my favorite :D whether I'm logging the next day or the next month.

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The only problem I have with that is if I don't have the paper (or PDA, previously) then I won't know if what I'm going to is just parking coords and I have to do something to find the cache other than follow my gpsr.

Another angle to consider, (although it would certainly deflate your frugal aspirations), is a new GPSr.

The Colorado, Oregon and PN-40 all store cache page data similar to a PDA.

Everything's contained in a single unit, and you don't have the battery life issues inherent in some PDAs. :D

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Another angle to consider, (although it would certainly deflate your frugal aspirations), is a new GPSr.

The Colorado, Oregon and PN-40 all store cache page data similar to a PDA.

Everything's contained in a single unit, and you don't have the battery life issues inherent in some PDAs. :D

How well do they work? How easy is it to enter notes into them? Do they allow logging of DNF as well as finds?

 

Never used one myself, curious about them. Thanks.

 

Thought of something that's not practical right now, but who knows for the near future. A tiny video camera on your shoulder that records when requested, and for a number of minutes when you're approaching GZ. Stores to flash memory. Sort of like a geocaching black box?

 

Creative Vado in Hideous Pink is available from Amazon for a little under $65. Hmm...

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Another angle to consider, (although it would certainly deflate your frugal aspirations), is a new GPSr.

The Colorado, Oregon and PN-40 all store cache page data similar to a PDA.

Everything's contained in a single unit, and you don't have the battery life issues inherent in some PDAs. :)

How well do they work? How easy is it to enter notes into them? Do they allow logging of DNF as well as finds?
I can only speak for the Oregon, since I haven't played with the other units, but it works very well. After you've found the cache, you hit the "Log Geocache" button, which gives you a choice of log types, including found or DNF. After you've selected log type, you get to choose between "Add Note" "Find Another" or "Done." If you select the note option, you can enter your notes using a touchpad that comes up onscreen. It's pretty slick.
Thought of something that's not practical right now, but who knows for the near future. A tiny video camera on your shoulder that records when requested, and for a number of minutes when you're approaching GZ. Stores to flash memory. Sort of like a geocaching black box?

 

Creative Vado in Hideous Pink is available from Amazon for a little under $65. Hmm...

I was at the GPS Adventure Maze this week, they had a mini theatre set up with a 360 degree movie of a guy out geocaching. It kinda made me think of people's home movies, it was great to be there, but nobody will ever want to watch it again, unless little Joey spit up all over Uncle Sal... :D
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