Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2
tsnyder88

how to become a ham Operator

Recommended Posts

i don't know if this right please to post this but i would like to know how to become a ham Operator

Share this post


Link to post

Hi Tsynder88, try going to ARRL.ORG web page,maybe e-mail them , they should be able to tell you what ham radio clubs are in your area,if you visit the club ,the hams there should be able to help you, it's a written test now, lasy Feb. the FCC drop morse code from the test. I'm hoping there's a ham geocacher in CO. reading this post that could help you, good luck,73 Dave,KD1EJ, Rhode Island

Share this post


Link to post

Buy the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual you can find it on the ARRL website or through Amazon, then go to a number of different ham radio sites like QRZ.com, Eham.net or just do a search for technician question pool and you can study all the question that will be on the test for free, its really easy you'll have your ticket in no time!

Share this post


Link to post

Buy the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual you can find it on the ARRL website or through Amazon, then go to a number of different ham radio sites like QRZ.com, Eham.net or just do a search for technician question pool and you can study all the question that will be on the test for free, its really easy you'll have your ticket in no time!

 

I am sure that you can spend almost any amount, but what is a rough cost to acquire basic, decent equipment?

Share this post


Link to post

Buy the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual you can find it on the ARRL website or through Amazon, then go to a number of different ham radio sites like QRZ.com, Eham.net or just do a search for technician question pool and you can study all the question that will be on the test for free, its really easy you'll have your ticket in no time!

Share this post


Link to post

Buy the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual you can find it on the ARRL website or through Amazon, then go to a number of different ham radio sites like QRZ.com, Eham.net or just do a search for technician question pool and you can study all the question that will be on the test for free, its really easy you'll have your ticket in no time!

 

I am sure that you can spend almost any amount, but what is a rough cost to acquire basic, decent equipment?

 

Icom 706 around $900, Icom 746 around $1500, you can go to Ham Radio Outlet on the web

Share this post


Link to post

Ham radio is like many other hobbies. Best advice I could give based on my 40 years as a ham would be to locate a local club and find an "ELMER"(an experienced ham who mentors newcomers) to get you plugged in. Amateur radio is often perceived as a rather "geeky" hobby and many hams certainly fit the mold. Most are just plain folks with a love for the magic of electronics. The age of computers and internet has had a huge impact on the ham demographic. It's no longer magic to talk to someone 1/2 way around the world by radio when it can be done on the internet in seconds. Many online resources ... check out eham.com. Lot's of info and personalities. Good Luck. Bart NC7A

Share this post


Link to post

Ham radio is like many other hobbies. Best advice I could give based on my 40 years as a ham would be to locate a local club and find an "ELMER"(an experienced ham who mentors newcomers) to get you plugged in. Amateur radio is often perceived as a rather "geeky" hobby and many hams certainly fit the mold. Most are just plain folks with a love for the magic of electronics. The age of computers and internet has had a huge impact on the ham demographic. It's no longer magic to talk to someone 1/2 way around the world by radio when it can be done on the internet in seconds. Many online resources ... check out eham.com. Lot's of info and personalities. Good Luck. Bart NC7A

 

:laughing: "Amateur radio is often perceived as a rather "geeky" hobby" says the fellow geocacher that walks around looking at something in his hand. :o I too am looking into getting a HAM license. I bought and recieved a manual from arrl.org and am just getting started. I guess I'm a little old fashioned in thinking that it's a good thing to talk to someone without the aid of a computer or the phone company from a couple hundred or farther miles away. I was wandering; what is a good medium power(I drive a Honda Civic) mobile radio and approx. how much should I expect to pay. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post

Buy the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual you can find it on the ARRL website or through Amazon, then go to a number of different ham radio sites like QRZ.com, Eham.net or just do a search for technician question pool and you can study all the question that will be on the test for free, its really easy you'll have your ticket in no time!

 

I am sure that you can spend almost any amount, but what is a rough cost to acquire basic, decent equipment?

 

You can get some single band HTs and single band mobiles for as little as $150. These would be VHF radios. That is what you would be using while geocaching.

Share this post


Link to post

 

 

:ph34r: "Amateur radio is often perceived as a rather "geeky" hobby" says the fellow geocacher that walks around looking at something in his hand. :( I too am looking into getting a HAM license. I bought and recieved a manual from arrl.org and am just getting started. I guess I'm a little old fashioned in thinking that it's a good thing to talk to someone without the aid of a computer or the phone company from a couple hundred or farther miles away. I was wandering; what is a good medium power(I drive a Honda Civic) mobile radio and approx. how much should I expect to pay. Thanks.

 

Agree with comments regarding ARRL and eham. Would recommend QRZ.com rather than eham for practice tests as they seem more robust on qrz.com.

 

Mobile radios come in basically 3 kinds.

 

1. 2 meter FM

2. Dual band 2 meter and 70 cm FM

3. #2 plus something (HF or 6 meters, etc)

 

What you need depends on what you want to do and where you are. If you are in California, getting into the WIN system is a powerful tool and will link you in to the world on either 2 meter or 70 cm via IRLP (Internet Radio Linking Protocol). So there, you could get by with #1 and be fine. I am in Nebraska. I would not bother with a mobile that didn't have both 2 meter and 70 cm. In most places that is true.

 

You can expect to pay around $300 for a good radio and about $50 for a good antenna. Mine is a 5/8 wave antenna on a motor mount, so I paid about $150 for the mount and the antenna. I love my motor mount. Magmounts are way cheaper and the way I went for a couple of years. You can get good deals on antennas and mounts at local hamfests.

 

Now what you want to do matters. I and my wife are NWS storm spotters. We regularly need all 50 watts and the gain I get off my antenna to get to the NWS through a storm. We have a Yaesu FT 8800R and it has served us well.

 

Remember to either have it professionally installed to you car battery or do it yourself. One of my friends did it himself, but did it post alternator, and you hear the alternator whine when ever he keys up.

 

Ham radio has lead us to some fun adventures. Best of luck with it. 73's.

Share this post


Link to post

Along with the ARRL book and the on-line practice tests, you can use the Ham Radio Podclass at http://www.hamradioclass.org/ to reinforce what you read. I used them during my lunch hour walks when I was studying for my general test.

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2

×