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Question requirements for Channel Tunnels


Lostby7

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I'm kinda of scratching my head on requirements for a series of channel tunnels nearby. Basically a channel tunnel is formed under glaciers by underwater rivers and then left over as ponds and lakes once the glacier recedes....I just cant think of anything to measure at the site. Clearly the lakes are there....and I can explain how the series of lakes were formed....but when it comes to the question part I'm stumped...any ideas?

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Could you do something with "direction" instead of size? Perhaps have folks compare the direction of the lakes with direction of travel of the retreating glaciers?

 

Or with materials that were left behind by the underwater rivers--erratics, sand, etc?

That is a good place to start...the series of lakes are generally rather narrow and do trend East / West which is the same direction of the glaciers travel. There is also a large bank (1oo feet or more) which extends North / South just a bit further West of the lakes...a possible terminal moraine? Good ideas thanks.

 

Any one else have an idea in case I can't get these to fly based on the view from the site....?

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I'm kinda of scratching my head on requirements for a series of channel tunnels nearby. Basically a channel tunnel is formed under glaciers by underwater rivers and then left over as ponds and lakes once the glacier recedes....I just cant think of anything to measure at the site. Clearly the lakes are there....and I can explain how the series of lakes were formed....but when it comes to the question part I'm stumped...any ideas?

 

I’m a bit confused by the term channel tunnel, a.k.a. “The Chunnel”, which connects the UK w/the rest of Europe. Based on the description, geologically, I’m interpreting this as an Esker or a Kettle Lake.

 

http://geology.com/dictionary/glossary-e.shtml

ESKER

A long winding ridge of sorted sands and gravel. Thought to be formed from sediment deposited by a stream flowing within or beneath a glacier.

 

http://geology.com/dictionary/glossary-k.shtml

KETTLE

A depression formed in glacial deposits when a buried block of ice, left behind by a retreating glacier, melts.

 

Eskers are topographical sediment remnants in the form of a hill, and your description is of a surface water nature. Therefore, I’m wondering if what may exist is a chain of Kettle Lakes that may be interconnected by either deep cut narrow gorges or flumes. The massive volumes of meltwater created by retreating glaciers could create a channel like connection between Kettle Lakes Considering the climate change and rise in groundwater level this could be hydrolocialy sustained through time.

 

Flumes have a couple of distinct features, one since your looking at an exposed cavern the sides of the stream have a noticeable curve entrench side, and secondly they should have noticeable directional changes that are hard angles that follow the fracture pattern of the bedrock. See the photos from Hell’s Hollow Trail McConnell’s Mill SP GC15C0A…

 

Could you submit a photo or Google Map Reference?

Hope this helps…

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Here is what I found (and rewrote so as not to plagiarize too badly) on the subject.

 

"...This area has a series of 13 lakes and ponds lying in a "tunnel channel" which is created when melt water under extreme pressure flows beneath the surface of a retreating glacier and blasts out a channel as the water moves toward the glacier’s margin. Eventually these tunnels refill with ice due to subsequent freezing or a tunnel collapse. When the glacier retreats these tunnels, which have a network of ice channels, are covered with sediment left by the glacier as it melts. The ice filled channels now covered with sediment (also known as outwash) eventually melt and create a valley which is often filled with water becoming a pond or lake. Tunnel channels are typically found to be between 16 and 98 feet in depth but have been found with depths as great as 164 feet...."

 

topo.jpg

 

Here is a Wisconsin DNR page about the site...

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/LAND/er/sna/sna226.htm

 

*edit to add DNR link

Edited by Lostby7
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Here is what I found (and rewrote so as not to plagiarize too badly) on the subject.

 

"...This area has a series of 13 lakes and ponds lying in a "tunnel channel" which is created when melt water under extreme pressure flows beneath the surface of a retreating glacier and blasts out a channel as the water moves toward the glacier’s margin. Eventually these tunnels refill with ice due to subsequent freezing or a tunnel collapse. When the glacier retreats these tunnels, which have a network of ice channels, are covered with sediment left by the glacier as it melts. The ice filled channels now covered with sediment (also known as outwash) eventually melt and create a valley which is often filled with water becoming a pond or lake. Tunnel channels are typically found to be between 16 and 98 feet in depth but have been found with depths as great as 164 feet...."

 

topo.jpg

 

Here is a Wisconsin DNR page about the site...

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/LAND/er/sna/sna226.htm

 

*edit to add DNR link

 

Thanks for the additional information. I now have a better understanding of what it was you were describing. I find the lack of surface streams in the area and connective streams among the Kettle Lake interesting.

 

According to the Map it looks like there is a small kettle depression just N of Second Lake within the WDNR State Natural Area #226. Perhaps if there is a trail have the participant use the GPSr to walk around this depression and measure the distance.

 

Other options may include designating a particular trail segment and apply the measuring requirement. Perhaps there is a glacial boulder nearby? Another thought might be to have them measure the distance and or elevation along the road that is the base of the tunnel channel/discharge area say from Sherman Lake NE to the base of the next hill. The trick here looks to be avoiding private propertyand endangered habitat.

 

If there is a museum or office with a display, perhaps questions could be derived from them. Information Trail Signs are also good. Again, this is a good point for the photo.

 

To avoid “Armchairing” this I would pick a good point along a trail for the photo.

 

It appears the there is an Ice Age Trail Group that may be of some help to you.

 

This looks like a very promising EC and hope the suggestions helped… Maybe someday I’ll make it to WI?

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