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60CSX or Oregon 400t?


bkh1972

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Being that there seems to be so many problems with the Oregon series and working out the kinks is it better to go with the 60CSX or am I going to find I have a paper trail being that the 60CSX is not paperless? Just want to get off to the right start being a newbie! THANKS in advance for the help.

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Would you consider carrying a Palm along with you cache trips? If you have an old Palm lying around, or buy one off Ebay for $25, you can be paperless with a 60CSx. I had an old 8mb Palm M125 that I didn't use anymore. I bouth Cachemate for $10 and GSAK for $25 and a Geocaching Premium membership for $30. I can create Pocket Queries and load into GSAK, then export a file to the Palm. The palm contains all the cache info. The entire description, the hints, as many logs as you want. It's all you need.

 

Another option, if you don't want to use a Palm, you can use a GSAK macro to send the cache info as custom Points of Interest to the 60csx. There are several options in the macro, but it can load the entire contents of the cache info that way too.

 

Bottom line, I've got a 60CSx, and haven't printed one sheet of paper in my caching experience (albeit limited with only 72 finds so far). But, by using the Palm, GSAK, and Cachemate, I don't need to waste paper by printing the cache info. It's all all at my fingertips.

 

Van

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you can use the garmin 60CSx with a Palm PDA for "paperless" caching..or.I have all the "stuff" to be paperless", but I was able setup my GSAK to give me the most important PDA info.....1) What kind of cache, traditional, Multi, etc,....2) what kind of container3) and the hint....I can download this info when sending to my GPSr via GSAK....This info is on my 60CSx, so I really don't need to look on my PDA for information about the cache, unless I need more info...I find that the cache page on a PDA is uncomfortable to use due to all the info in one place, and scrolling. With one quick look I can see what I need, Happy hunting

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Being that there seems to be so many problems with the Oregon series and working out the kinks is it better to go with the 60CSX or am I going to find I have a paper trail being that the 60CSX is not paperless? Just want to get off to the right start being a newbie! THANKS in advance for the help.

 

DeLorme PN-40. WWW.DeLorme.com So much more for under $300.

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I own both.

I have and I have used a Garmin 60C for years (the older ancestor of the 60CSX but functionally the same) and this summer I purchased an Oregon 400T.

 

I used them both on my summer vacation and I have put the 60C away for good, I no longer use it.

There are some issues with the 400T but I think the issues are minor compared to the benefits. My 400T was pre-purchased before the Oregon's were available in Canada so it is a very early production of the unit.

 

My advice, go with the 400T. I really like mine and for me it is a much better unit than my Garmin 60C.

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My advice, go with the 400T. I really like mine and for me it is a much better unit than my Garmin 60C.

I own a Garmin 76 CS, a Garmin 60 CS, and a garmin 60 CSx. I wouldn't compare a Garmin 60C to a Garmin 60 CSx.

 

The CSx is a far superior unit. It's in another class completely from the C. They have different chipsets, the 60CSx is much more accurate; the 60C is not expandable and has a much more limited memory capability than the 60CSx.

 

I want new toys like anyone else. I;ve been looking at the Oregon 400t and the DeLorme PN-40. They both have things about them I think would be interesting...well, mostly it's the idea of the integrated PDA capability that interests me. However, they both have drawbacks that are keeping me from buying them. (For the Oregon, its mostly the screen being unreadable and some of the things the 60CSx does that it won't--for the Delorme it's the hassle and fussiness factor with the maps)...but maybe one day one of them will win me over...

 

Until then I love my 60 CSx. I still say it's the best unit out there for caching, bar none. Simple to use, easy to read, a pleasure to own and very rugged and dependable.

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The CSx is a far superior unit. It's in another class completely from the C. They have different chipsets, the 60CSx is much more accurate; the 60C is not expandable and has a much more limited memory capability than the 60CSx.

 

Neos2 is right, don't go buy a 60C, the 60 CSx is a better unit than the 60C. :)

As far as geocaching goes the 60CSx and the 60C are the same with the 60CSx offering only a few advantages like better tracking under tree cover and faster locks and relocks on satellites.

All the 60 Series are functionally identical, same interface, same buttons, same everything and truth be told, that barometric altimeter isn't much help in geocaching.

Accuracy doesn't matter that much, the geocache hider has his GPS and that is as close as the coordinates are going to be. Memory doesn't matter for geocaching, the 60C's 56MB of internal memory is plenty unless you are going on a long road trip. Extra memory and extra accuracy won't help you find geocaches, once you get to the general area you put away your GPS and and look.

But for geocachers, the 400T is a superior GPS to any the 60 Series GPS's in every regard. It is completely expandable, just as accurate, just as rugged, smaller and much easier to use, it is superior to the old 60CSx in every way. In addition to being accurate and easy to use it has a host of advanced geocaching features that let you enjoy geocaching with a single handheld unit, no PDA needed.

 

Spend your money getting the most geocaching bang for your buck, that is the 400T for sure.

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Very good questions, indeed. Firstly.... WELCOME TO GEOCACHING!!!!!

 

Personally, I own a 60cx. It's a battlewagon, I mean VERY reliable. It's been around for several years in one form or another. I'm not one to jump on the bandwagon as soon as a new GPSr comes out. As my old grandfather used to say, "When others run, you walk."

 

Get the 60cx, then buy a cheap Palm for $15 - $20, then get a great program called 'Cachemate'. Please check out my blog. I've written about paperless caching, new (overpriced) GPS receivers, and another cool program called GSAK.

 

Cache Safe!

Grigorii Rasputin

http://grigoriirasputin.wordpress.com

http://www.glass-cockpit.org

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60C(s)X + cheap Palm + GSAK = reliable. 60C(s)x is still the "workhorse". You'd be silly to not buy at least a 60CX.

 

Oregon (+ GSAK if you want better cache management than simple Pocket Queries) = fun in one hand :). The OR works well if you are OK with the screen brightness. Quick machine, fun to use.

Edited by Maingray
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As far as geocaching goes the 60CSx and the 60C are the same with the 60CSx offering only a few advantages like better tracking under tree cover and faster locks and relocks on satellites.

All the 60 Series are functionally identical, same interface, same buttons, same everything and truth be told, that barometric altimeter isn't much help in geocaching.

Not quite right.

 

The 60 CSx takes a removable microSD card, has the high-sensitivity SiRFSTARIII chipset, includes a barometric altimeter, and an electronic compass.

 

The 60 C is a color unit. It doesn't take the expandable card, it doesn't have the SiRFSTARIII chip, it doesn't have a barometric altimeter or an electronic compass.

 

S = electronic compass (sensor)/barometer

x = expandable card

 

The barometer isn't useful for caching per se, but the electronic compass makes a tremendous difference in rough areas. If you don't have that, you must be walking at a fairly brisk pace to have a functioning compass. On a steep hill or a rugged canyon, that can make all the difference in the world.

 

I've heard that the Oregons are not as accurate under heavy cover...but I haven't witnessed it. None of my caching friends kept their Oregons long enough for me to see them. They sent them back and started using their 60 CSx's again. :)

 

Edited for spelin

Edited by Neos2
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I have never used the 60csx so I can't say much about it but we recently got the Oregon 400T and we love it. Before the Oregon we used a Magellan Explorist 500 and printed out the cache pages. Then we loaded the cache pages into our Nuvi so we could be paperless. That was better but the Oregon is much better. It is nice to only have 1 unit and have all the info you need at your fingertips. The only drawback I've had with the Oregon is battery life. I am using rechargeables but in the cold they don't seem to last very long so we just make sure we take extra batteries with us. Don't regret buying the Oregon 400T at all.

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I have never used the 60csx so I can't say much about it but we recently got the Oregon 400T and we love it. Before the Oregon we used a Magellan Explorist 500 and printed out the cache pages. Then we loaded the cache pages into our Nuvi so we could be paperless. That was better but the Oregon is much better. It is nice to only have 1 unit and have all the info you need at your fingertips. The only drawback I've had with the Oregon is battery life. I am using rechargeables but in the cold they don't seem to last very long so we just make sure we take extra batteries with us. Don't regret buying the Oregon 400T at all.

 

I carry a bunch of rechargeables as well. :rolleyes:

I also keep the light bulb fully +'ed up all the time with the timeout set to 1:00 minute.

 

I haven't used my 60 Series since this summer when we used both GPS's on an extended road trip. The 400T outperformed the 60 Series in every respect. I found a lot of geocaches with my 60 Series and never had any problems, it was a rugged and reliable unit.

The Oregon was much more user friendly from the get go but it wasn't until I actually used the Oregon for a few weeks that I started to see how much better it was for geocaching. Now my backup unit is my 60C, my Magellan Explorist has been given to my youngest son and my new main unit for all purposes is my Oregon.

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but the electronic compass makes a tremendous difference in rough areas.

 

My compass is pretty reliable but it is just a plain old compass.

The compass on my new 400T works fine.

I have witnessed the 400T, side by side with the 60 Series and as a geocaching unit the 400T is superior in every way.

My 60 Series was a fine unit, actually it was an excellent unit, I never had any issues with except a warranty repair that went south. When it came to geocaching my 60 Series worked/works great, but the 400T is much much better, in fact it is so much better they really aren't comparable.

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but the electronic compass makes a tremendous difference in rough areas.

 

My compass is pretty reliable but it is just a plain old compass.

The compass on my new 400T works fine.

I have witnessed the 400T, side by side with the 60 Series and as a geocaching unit the 400T is superior in every way.

My 60 Series was a fine unit, actually it was an excellent unit, I never had any issues with except a warranty repair that went south. When it came to geocaching my 60 Series worked/works great, but the 400T is much much better, in fact it is so much better they really aren't comparable.

Yes, but as I said, the 60C you are talking about is not like the 60CSx.

 

It's like you are comparing the 400t to the Legend or the 60CSx to the Legend or the 300t to the Vista C, or or or... I'm just saying, all of those units are good for what they are capable of doing, but it really doesn't help to compare the 60C you had to either the 400t or the 60CSx, because they are so different.

 

Comparing the 60C to either of the other two units is like saying you think your black Permamarker is better than a yellow highlighter when someone asked you about a black Sharpie.

 

In case you dont get the analogy, the 60C would be the yellow highlighter in this case...Yellow highlighters are fine things, but useless when you need a black marker.

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but the electronic compass makes a tremendous difference in rough areas.

 

My compass is pretty reliable but it is just a plain old compass.

The compass on my new 400T works fine.

I have witnessed the 400T, side by side with the 60 Series and as a geocaching unit the 400T is superior in every way.

My 60 Series was a fine unit, actually it was an excellent unit, I never had any issues with except a warranty repair that went south. When it came to geocaching my 60 Series worked/works great, but the 400T is much much better, in fact it is so much better they really aren't comparable.

 

You're comparing a 60C, while the OP was asking about a 60CSX. The 60C and 60CSX are very different units and the 60CSCX is vastly superior to the 60C. You are not making a valid comparison.

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Okay, here's my newbie $.02 on the matter. When I decided to get into geocaching I didn't own a GPS. I went with some friends who use the 60Csx and an iPod for the paperless part. When I went to test out GPSs that's what I thought I would end up doing as well, but it didn't work out that way. When I tried them out, I was amazed at how easy the Oregon was to use. It's a breeze downloading caches and info to it without having to load info on another device. I think there is a lot to learn about all the different technologies when you start caching. I've been able to take my time when it comes to using GSAK and Cachemate and all the others because all I have to do is hit 'download' and everything is right there. It's awesome being able to have the hints and past logs from the cache available when you're stumped! I've found the touch screen intuitive and easy to use and personally have had no problem with the brightness of the screen.

 

I don't have a car GPS so I loaded the Garmin City Navigator onto a $15 2gig mini card from Radio Shack which now gives me the option of navigating "as the crow flies" or with turn by turn directions. The only thing the Oregon doesn't do is talk to me when I'm driving.

 

I don't have a ton of money so my thoughts when buying a GPS were this: it wasn't like I was deciding between a $99 eTrex and a $600 Oregon. $600 is a lot of money to me, but so is $400, the price of the 60Csx. I figured if I'm going to buy one GPS that has all the features I want, I'll just spend the extra $200.

 

I've been absolutely satisfied my choice. Good luck!

 

***I'm editing this because I'm sure people are going to point out that the 60Csx can be had for a lot less than $400. In my case, that was the price and I was willing to pay the extra right then and not worry about upgrading anytime soon. After using my Oregon for a couple of months now, I would still pay the extra (roughly) $350 because I love it so much!

Edited by Trick or Treat
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You see a lot of people who prefer the 60CSX over the Oregon because they are disappointed that the Oregon doesn't have a lot of features that the 60CSX has. Rather than building on the 60CSX and adding features, Garmin started from scratch and created a very different unit and those differences make it unacceptable to many 60CSX users.

 

However, for someone new to GPS and geocaching, the Oregon makes a fine choice because it's a decent unit that has some good features and they don't have the 60CSX to compare it to.

 

In the end, neither is a bad choice. It's a matter of what you are willing to spend. The 60CSX can be had for under $300. Add an inexpensive, used PDA and Cachemate (or other app) for paperless caching and you still come in well under the price of an Oregon.

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You see a lot of people who prefer the 60CSX over the Oregon because they are disappointed that the Oregon doesn't have a lot of features that the 60CSX has. Rather than building on the 60CSX and adding features, Garmin started from scratch and created a very different unit and those differences make it unacceptable to many 60CSX users.

 

However, for someone new to GPS and geocaching, the Oregon makes a fine choice because it's a decent unit that has some good features and they don't have the 60CSX to compare it to.

 

In the end, neither is a bad choice. It's a matter of what you are willing to spend. The 60CSX can be had for under $300. Add an inexpensive, used PDA and Cachemate (or other app) for paperless caching and you still come in well under the price of an Oregon.

 

Great post, briansnat....I am one of those who loves the 60CSx, but I just enjoy learning the "latest and greatest" (as long as I don't have to pay full price to do so)

 

The 400T can be had from several sellers on eBay for well under $500, which is significantly below the $600 retail price. If you do a search for it with the microsoft live search (go to live.com and search for "ebay garmin 400T" you will get a discount (sometimes as high as 30%.) I only got 15%, but I also had a coupon from eBay for 20%, so I came in under $300, which was a very acceptable price to me (less than I paid last year for my CSx.) Anyway, try that, and you might find a pretty good deal. I found several dealers online who had the 400T listed on the low side of the 400 to 500 range.

 

Having had a 60CS and CSx both, and soon the 400T, which I have tested some, but not fully, I can already tell you that they are very different in the way they function. They definitely went "back to the drawing board" with the 400T, and it's a very nice unit. I think the key to getting familiar with any GPS is about the same as learning your way around a new cell phone. You know what features you expect it to be able to do, but learning HOW to do them takes a little time. I know I used my CS for several months and was quite happy with it before I opened the instruction manual and discovered lots of other things it could do that I had no idea about. I expect the same thing with the Oregon, except I really am planning on reading the instructions.

 

Anyway, I agree with briansnat. You can't compare one unit with another. Each has it's own things that it does best. I am sure that I will continue to use both units in consideration of their respective strengths, but I really hope this little investment pays off in many months of enjoyment....until the NEXT cool thing comes out!

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You're comparing a 60C, while the OP was asking about a 60CSX. The 60C and 60CSX are very different units and the 60CSCX is vastly superior to the 60C. You are not making a valid comparison.

 

60C, 60CSx, tomato, tomahto. :D

400T, potato

 

The comparison I am making is totally valid, all the GPSMap 60 Series receiver's are very similar.

In fact the 60C and the 60CSx are not only similar they are actually identical when it comes to their geocaching features, there is no difference at all.

The OP can look at page 72 of the CSx owners manual and page 27 of the 60C owners manual to see that the feature set for geocaching is identical for both units.

A valid comparison cannot be made between any Oregon Series receiver and any GPSMap 60 Series receiver when it comes to geocaching, the Oregon is the "vastly superior" geocaching GPS in every respect.

 

The GPSMap 60 CSx Accuracy is <33 Feet

The GPSMap 60C Accuracy is <49 feet

 

The GPSMap 60CSx acquires in 1 second

The GPSMap 60C acquires in 15 seconds

 

The GPSmap 60CSx ships with a 64MEG Micro SD card (Expandable)

The GPSMap 60C ships wiith 56MEG Internal Memory (Not Expandable)

 

The GPSMap 60CSx has a barometric altimeter and an inertial compass.

The GPSMap 60C has an electronic compass and no altimeter

 

There is one VAST difference for those out on the trail though -

 

The GPSMap 60C averages 30 Hours on two double AA's

The GPSMap 60CSx averages 18 hours on two double AA's, that barometric altimeter uses lots of power!! :D

 

As you can see the 60C and the 60CSx are almost identical...but if you really want to see what a vast difference looks like compare the geocaching features on the Oregon to any of the 60Maps, you'll see a big difference.

 

So tell me briansnat, which features are offered on the 60CSx that make you say it is "vastly superior" to the 60C for geocaching, the barometric altimeter? :D

 

60c.jpg

60csx.jpg

oreg400t.jpg

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So tell me briansnat, which features are offered on the 60CSx that make you say it is "vastly superior" to the 60C for geocaching, the barometric altimeter? :D

 

 

The difference between the 60C and the 60CSx is significant, because you can load custom POIs in the CSx, which means the capability to carry virtually unlimited cache data with you. It's as close to paperless as you can get with the 60 series. I have 20000 caches loaded in my CSx right now. To my knowledge, you cannot upload cache data in this manner to the other GPSMAP models that do not have expandable memory. If I am mistaken, please let me know. The SirfIII technology in the CSx also does provide better signal acquisition and lock, and the processor in the CSx is appreciably faster. The maps load more quickly, and the map pan feature is smoother. Basically, it's a better 60CS wtih more memory, better reception, and faster processor. Everything else is identical. But the difference is huge.

 

I agree that the Oregon's geocaching features are superior, however...which is why I anxiously await delivery of mine. It's somewhere over Kansas right now, I'm sure.

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The difference between the 60C and the 60CSx is significant, because you can load custom POIs in the CSx

I agree that the Oregon's geocaching features are superior, however...which is why I anxiously await delivery of mine. It's somewhere over Kansas right now, I'm sure.

 

The ability to load Custom POI's will really appeal to the Magellan users. :D

 

The 60Map Series of GPS's are really only comparable to the other almost identical models of the 60Map Series, someone who thinks they are getting a "vastly superior unit" by upgrading from a 60C to a 60CSx is going to be very disappointed, there are some incremental differences that make the CSx a better GPS but shoehorning in some extra waypoints isn't a big draw for new geocachers (see the OP). All the 60Map Series have a rudimentary geocaching feature.

 

You will be very impressed with your new Oregon once you get it out on the trail. It is a much better geocaching unit and that goes double for new geocachers.

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So tell me briansnat, which features are offered on the 60CSx that make you say it is "vastly superior" to the 60C for geocaching, the barometric altimeter?

 

As someone who owns both...

 

1. High sensitivity SirfIII receiver (this alone makes it vastly superior)

2. Up to 2 gigs of map memory vs. fixed 54 megs for the 60C

3. Much faster processor when using auto routing function

4. Maps load much faster when panning

5. Capacity for thousands of cache waypoints via custom POIs vs 1,000 for 60C

6. Ability to hold cache hints via custom POIs and GSAK. 60C can't.

7. Compass

8. Capacity to store nearly unlimited tracks

 

In reality the only similarities between the 60C and 60CSX are the user interface and the form factor. Internally they are completely different units.

 

The ability to load Custom POI's will really appeal to the Magellan users

 

It appeals to anybody who doesn't wanted to be limited to 1,000 cache waypoints. I have every cache in my region in my 60CSX plus caches in areas where I travel frequently. Over 5,000 - with hints. Can't do that with a 60C.

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Pretty much just saying what every one else has already said, but we use a 60csx and a Palm m130. We are completely paperless and have all of the info we need with us. We have had the 60csx for a number of years now with NO problems at all. I here mixed reviews about the Oregon so for now we are sticking to what we know works best. Garmin 60csx

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To the moderators:

Why not pin a thread on advice regarding GPSr as it seems to be such a common question?

 

Because every person who asks has different needs and price ranges, and the available models constantly change. That and I don't think a lot of people even bother reading pinned threads. Witness the test posts we get here every week when we have a thread pinned for test posting.

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I bought a 60CSx last week to replace a GPS12 that got bounced off the pavement at highway speed. I looked at the Oregon and it's certainly a nice unit. What decided me on the 60CSx was the better screen visibility and its reputation for better sensitivity. I already use Cachemate on a PDA so the integrated caching support on the Oregon didn't mean quite so much to me; I was already paperless even with the GPS12!

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In reality the only similarities between the 60C and 60CSX are the user interface and the form factor.

 

So the 60c and 60CSx look identical, they have the same user interface and they offer identical geocaching features, is that about right?

I never once considered upgrading my 60C for a 60CSx, I saved my money and bought the Oregon. ;)

 

I appreciate that you can use some kludges to make your 60CSx a slightly better unit for geocaching than your 60C. The Oregon doesn't require these workarounds, you don't need to use Custom POI software, GSAK or a PDA. An Oregon series GPS used with this website ushers in a whole new level of geocaching functionailty and fun.

 

There is no comparison between any Oregon and any 60Map series when it comes to geocaching.

The 400T is superior to the 60CSx in every regard.

Edited by wavector
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In reality the only similarities between the 60C and 60CSX are the user interface and the form factor.

 

So the 60c and 60CSx look identical, they have the same user interface and they offer identical geocaching features, is that about right?

 

No.

 

They look the same (same body) they are different other than that.

 

They have different chipsets. The 60CSx has a high sensitivity chipset. In fact, it has such a great chipset the company put the same chip into the 400t.

 

They offer similar features, but the 60CSx isn't restricted to the 56 MB of built in memory like your 60C was.

The 60 CSx takes a removable microSD data card.

That allows you to save 1000 geocaches to the unit (as did the 60C) but....

It also allows a tremendous amount of maps to be saved to the unit. I keep city and topo maps for half the US in my unit on my 2Gb card.

It also allows you to save several thousand Points of Interest (POIs) to the unit.

You can also save the full cache information to the unit via POIs.

 

The 60CSx has a barometric altimeter and electronic compass; the 60C did not have those things.

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So the 60c and 60CSx look identical, they have the same user interface and they offer identical geocaching features, is that about right?

 

That's about wrong. Guess you didn't read my list above. There are numerous differences.

 

If you want features that are important for geocaching:

 

- virtually unlimited cache waypoints in the 60CSX vs 1000 in the 60C

- Compass in the 60CSX, none in the 60C

- Ability to hold cache info, including hints in the 60CSX. Not in the 60C

- High sensitivity receiver for great reception under trees in the 60CSX. Not in the 60C.

- Faster rendering of maps when panning

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The 400T is superior to the 60CSx in every regard.

 

Waypoint search from map pointer location 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Battery life 60CSX 18 hours, Oregon 16 hours

Manually delete geocaches 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Sirf III chipset 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Mark a waypoint from any screen 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Waypoint averaging 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Change track color/width 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Screen readability in sunlight 60CSX good, Oregon poor

Map declutter 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Delete waypoints by symbol 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Search by waypoint symbol 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Display distance between waypoints 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Configurable compass on/off speed setting 60CSX yes, Oregon no

View all waypoints by name 60CSX yes, Oregon No

Supports custom waypoint symbols 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Newly created waypoints show as recent finds 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Accuracy ring on map page 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Rename tracks 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Supports sight n go 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Night-day color modes 60CSX yes, Oregon no

Order of waypoints on list update as you move 60CSX yes, Oregon no

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So the 60c and 60CSx look identical, they have the same user interface and they offer identical geocaching features, is that about right?

 

I read your list and those additions to the 60CSx aren't geocaching features. [....] The 60C has a compass, you may not have noticed it because you are too busy using workarounds to try and make your 60CSx act like an Oregon. :santa:

Take a look at your Owner Manual, Page 14.

 

The 60C has a manual compass.

 

From the manual:

The compass does not function as a magnetic compass when you are stationary. However, when you move, the dial rotates to keep you oriented in relation to North. This is especially helpful when using a paper map in conjunction with your unit for navigation.

 

The 60CSx has an electronic compass. See page 49 of the owners manual.

The electronic compass acts like a magnetic compass when you are stationary. When you are moving and reach a preset speed, it uses data from the GPS receiver to maintain your heading.

 

If you have had a 60C for months or years and you don't know any of this stuff I'm not sure you can convince me you know much about the Oregon yet, either. ;)

 

I surely don't want my beloved 60CSx to act like an Oregon ): And since I had the 60CSx long before they even thought of the Oregon, and love it just the way it is--your statement that I might want my 60CSx to be more like the Oregon seems like a somewhat weird notion to me. Someone asked me why I wouldn't want a 400t...I'll try to explain...

 

According to people who have owned both the 400t and the 60CSx, the 60CSx has better reception in dense cover than the 400t, due to the type of antennae used on the 60CSx (quad helix). (Edited to add: I thought they had switched the Oregon to the better chipset, but Briansnat says the Oregon doesn't have the same chip as the 60CSx--that is probably the difference in reception then)

 

The 60CSx will not lose it's signal as quickly as the 400t.

 

They also say the touch screen on the 400t comes with a significant drawback as far as I am concerned -- lack of good visibility.

 

Unlike the 60CSx, you can't mark a waypoint from any screen on the 400t; it must be done from the main screen.

 

There is no Sight n' Go function do; it's clunky to do a waypoint projection like you can with the 60CSx.

 

Battery life is more limited on the 400t.

 

The 400t doesn't have the easy to use "Find Next Closest" feature that they 60CSx has; you have to go back to the list of caches.

 

The topo maps on the 400t come preloaded to the device and can't be used on the computer for route planning.

My maps are on disks and they get loaded to the micro SD card on the 60CSx. I can load the parts I need as I desire. I can load several maps at once and flip between them. I can use them on my home computer, my laptop, or my school computer. If I am going across country, I can load all the maps I need for my trip--without having to load things I don't need, which would slow down my processor. (Which is why my 60CSx does not take as long as the 400t to redraw the maps).

 

Because the 60CSx has the micro SD card, I could also choose to load POIs and have the cache page info on the gps. I prefer to have it on a PDA. That way I can navigate to the cache with the gps and still read the cache page on the way. I use GSAK to have some basic info on the gps for every cache --ID, size, type, difficulty & terrain, last found date. That usually means I don;'t have to keep looking at the cache page for all that info as I look for the cache. It's right there on the screen.

 

The Oregon apparently has some questionable abilities for navigation to the cache (or just in a strange town):

If you are on another page other than the map page you get a beep warning that a turn is coming but no preview. You only see the page you are on at that time.

 

If you miss your turn, the unit takes a long time to correct the path, and may fail entirely. You can't manually stop, edit, or recalculate your route from the map screen; you have to exit the map screen to the main menu then go to active route screen.

My husband uses his 60CSx for work. He is a truck driver. He would be extremely annoyed if his gps let him miss an upcoming turn. It's a little hard to find a place to turn around with an 80 foot trailer behind you. We need something reliable. The 60 CSx is just that.

 

I've also heard that the Oregon doesn't do waypoint averaging, has problems with reporting tracks accurately, and is excruciatingly slow to redraw.

 

No, thanks. I'm glad you like your new gps. As for me, I'm sticking with one that does what I really need it to do.

 

I really hope you finally understand that the 60C is a very different unit than the 60CSx. If not, I don't know how else to explain it to you.

Edited by Neos2
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- Compass in the 60CSX, none in the 60C

 

The 60C has a manual compass.

 

Are you saying briansnat is wrong as well? :santa:

 

The 60CSx and the 60C have exactly the same set of rudimentary geocaching features, they are identical in every respect. Mucking about with Custom POI's and GSAK and scraping cache pages to glean info to stuff in the 60CSx may sound just ducky to some people but new geocachers want to go geocaching.

 

The Oregon is simply a superior geocaching unit in every way.

I am so right briansnat is deleting my posts!! ;)

The OP should get an Oregon, so should you and briansnat, it is the superior GPS for geocahcing.

 

Of course another option for the OP would be to talk to a Garmin rep and ask them which unit is best for a new geocacher, I am pretty sure Garmin would say that briansnat is wrong as well.

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Wow. All I can say is that I am sure glad I have both...or will have when my OR 400T finally shows up. Sounds like I can expect to still get plenty of use out of my 60CSx...I can't say I am surprised...it's been so much better than every other GPS before it that I can't imagine there really being anythin that's actually better.

 

That said, I am excited about all the new bells and whistles on the OR.

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In reality the only similarities between the 60C and 60CSX are the user interface and the form factor.

 

So the 60c and 60CSx look identical, they have the same user interface and they offer identical geocaching features, is that about right?

I never once considered upgrading my 60C for a 60CSx, I saved my money and bought the Oregon. ;)

 

I appreciate that you can use some kludges to make your 60CSx a slightly better unit for geocaching than your 60C. The Oregon doesn't require these workarounds, you don't need to use Custom POI software, GSAK or a PDA. An Oregon series GPS used with this website ushers in a whole new level of geocaching functionailty and fun.

 

There is no comparison between any Oregon and any 60Map series when it comes to geocaching.

The 400T is superior to the 60CSx in every regard.

 

I stopped at this post before reading on down to see what else was said.

 

The 60c, cs and 60cx, csx models do have alot of the same features and the user operating procedures on both are the same, but there are big differences in how well they work. Satellite reception and speed of display refresh are two important things to look at and this is where the cx and csx models blow the older c and cs's out of the water. These two things alone make the cx and csx models vastly superior!

 

As far as your last statement, the Oregon is not superior in every regard. The only thing i can come up with, and yes it is very nice, is that you can load cache page info into the unit. Other than that, there is nothing there that makes it a better unit for geocaching. Oh, unless you somehow think that it's extraordinarily high price tag is a must have! :santa:

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It's too bad they can't add all the extra things the 60CSx offers, but with a touch screen and complete paperless caching. If Garmin did that, I think they'd have another homerun. Throw in the ability to add satellite imagery overlay. Basiscally, take the best of the both the 60CSx and the Oregon, add in the image capability of the PN-40, and they'd end up with one kick-%# unit.

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Thanks for everyones advice on the different gps models. I purchased a 60 CSX and will use an old palm to download cache info!!! I'll let you know how things go...THANKS AGAIN!!!

 

Congratulations on your purchase.

The 60CSx is a solid reliable unit and you won't have any problems with this old workhorse.

It has been almost three years since the 60CSx was awarded "Unit of the Year" by Outdoor Magazine. Handheld electronics change pretty quickly but the 60Map Series have been dependable reliable units for many years.

You will need some additional software to get everything up and going but you will be out on the trails in no time at all with your Palm and your GPS.

You will have a lot of fun.

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It's too bad they can't add all the extra things the 60CSx offers, but with a touch screen and complete paperless caching. If Garmin did that, I think they'd have another homerun. Throw in the ability to add satellite imagery overlay. Basiscally, take the best of the both the 60CSx and the Oregon, add in the image capability of the PN-40, and they'd end up with one kick-%# unit.

 

I was thinking of adding TOPO software....any other suggestions or ideas?

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It's too bad they can't add all the extra things the 60CSx offers, but with a touch screen and complete paperless caching. If Garmin did that, I think they'd have another homerun. Throw in the ability to add satellite imagery overlay. Basiscally, take the best of the both the 60CSx and the Oregon, add in the image capability of the PN-40, and they'd end up with one kick-%# unit.

 

I was thinking of adding TOPO software....any other suggestions or ideas?

 

Topo is helpful and City Navigator if you want it to give you turn by turn driving directions. Having both on your unit is ideal as you can run them concurrently and switch between them as needed. If you can just afford one, consider your chief use of the unit. If it's for hiking, backpacking, hunting, off roading and geocaches in the backcountry get Topo. If it's for getting around town and for urban and suburban geocaches, get City Navigator.

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I've got both sets of maps with my unit, Topo 2008 and City Navigator 2009 (non NT version). If I had to only choose one map, I'd probably get the City Navigator maps since you could use the unit for auto-routing when not using for caching too. I've got a RAM mount in my car and use the 60CSx exclusively when not using it for caching, and the auto-routing is very slick.

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On my Oregon I use the US Topo basemap, City Navigator NT and Topo Canada, they are all active at the same time which is fine when I am on the trail, I don't think you can do that on a 60CSx, it only allows one mapping program to be active at a time.

If your budget is limited then get a program with good road maps, your GPS is useful for driving around and I have never met a person who didn't learn to love that aspect of having a GPS, knowing where to turn and finding addresses.

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Like Briansnat mentioned, get the program that you think you'll use most often. I have Metroguide (it doesn't give turn by turn directions) and topo loaded on mine but find that i rarely use the topo maps when caching. It depends on where you cache for sure. Mountains, gullies, areas with lots of river and/or water crossings, trails, etc,, are where the topo really helps!

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I got a a great deal on my 60csx, and it's great, rugged and easy to use and like some others said you can load custom POI's but.... Like most people these days i have

an internet capable phone, i just go to the geocaching.com that i have bookmarked plug in the cache # im looking for and there ya go all the info plus all the logs. At least in my area there isn't anywhere now that you can't get even a little cell service. Iv'e had my hands on a 400t, nice unit kind of hard to see in direct sunlight IMHO. It's geocaching capablites are impressive i must admit, but i get the same results for ohhh 1/4 of the price :laughing:

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