Jump to content

South African (Off-Topic) Quiz


DamhuisClan
Followers 17

Recommended Posts

'vooruitbepaalde' ?

 

'vooropgestelde' ?

 

'standaard' ?

 

'standaard' is close - one online source gives 'standaard waarde' for 'default value'

 

The question is, if you use the word 'standaard', will anyone ever translate it back to 'default'?

 

So there is another (shorter) word... :D:)

Link to comment

Verstek

?

 

Yip, that's the one - 'verstek'.

 

Wonder if somebody knew that? I learned the word in the 80's while trying to write an Afrikaans document in the IT environment and nobody knew then. I had to task the special pool of typists/'taalversorgers' to find out for me. Wordprocessing on Wang machines, if I remember correctly. Those were the days... Not the good ones. :) Ever since then I have found maybe 1 or 2 people over the years who actually knew the answer off-hand. And nobody's ever offered 'standaard', which would be a fair option.

Link to comment

Witliesbosbontrokkie!

Well done! Did you know that, or did you look it up?

You're it!

 

<_< ...only knew to look for Robert's... Have a bud that's a serious birder. Him and his dad. So if they see something they SMS each other, like 'CB' for Chinspot Batis. So we're riding in the car when this chicken runs over the road. Took his dad a while and a conversation to find out what was 'C'

Link to comment

I would say that no, you can;t ask a question you dont know the answer to. After all, how would you know who gives the right answer to start next, so I would suggest asking a different question, otherwise to much confsion would result.

But feel free to stick that question on a new forum post, but I think there was once a forum post on common geocaching afrikaans words.

 

All the same, if I had to answer the question, I would say the common Afrikaans term is "GPS"

Link to comment

I would say that no, you can;t ask a question you dont know the answer to. After all, how would you know who gives the right answer to start next, so I would suggest asking a different question, otherwise to much confsion would result.

But feel free to stick that question on a new forum post, but I think there was once a forum post on common geocaching afrikaans words.

 

All the same, if I had to answer the question, I would say the common Afrikaans term is "GPS"

 

Geez, it was a rhetoric question. We're so serious, must be your weather.

 

Well done, you're right then, moving on.

Edited by dakardrix
Link to comment

I think San (bushman) but the name escapes me - think I saw one in the museum.

 

Bushman but unfortunately my computer cannot display the characters needed to indicate the various clicks to write the name here. :D:rolleyes: The best it can do is Arabic notation!! Sorry about that - somebody who has the necessary characters will have to give the phonetic name - which eludes me right now!! :blink:<_< hehe :rolleyes:

Link to comment

ok you are all on the wrong track. I belive there is a very similar African instrument, I forget its name too. I have seen one of those, but that was smaller than the one I am referring to, which is quite large.

Think of a different continent here.

 

In case anyone is interested, I used to be able to play these. You rest the string connecting the stick to the calabash on your baby finger, grip the stick with your middle and index finder, and hold a stone on coin between your thumb and forefinger. Then you hit the string with the small stick, while moving the calabash in and out of your stomache to affect the resonance, and touching the stone to the string or moving it away to change the note.

All in all, a bit of a pain on the hand!

 

Another clue, Mazda is vaguely associated with this instrument too

Link to comment

Well done dakardrix, your go ;)

 

I am sure you might recall that annoying Mazda add, with the song Zoom Zoom Zoom?

That was stolen from a capoira song called Zum Zum Zum.

The lyrics interestingly mean "Capeira kills one" - I am sure Mazda did not know that their theme tune is about murder ;)

 

Here are some choice translations of the song:

 

"Zoom zoom zoom Capoeira kills one

Zoom zoom zoom Capoeira kills one

Kills one, kills two and kills three

If I had a berimbau

I would kill all in one time

zoom zoom zoom

Zoom zoom zoom Capoeira kills one

Zoom zoom zoom Capoeira kills one "

 

not as good assurace of the safety of the car :ph34r:

Link to comment

Not sure if you are referring to the cellar that they have on St Helena Mine on the Goldfields. The mine is situated near Welkom on the road to Virginia if my memory serves me right. I have been underground there a number of times over the years but never visited the wine cellar - that only came a number of years later though.

Link to comment

Not sure if you are referring to the cellar that they have on St Helena Mine on the Goldfields. The mine is situated near Welkom on the road to Virginia if my memory serves me right. I have been underground there a number of times over the years but never visited the wine cellar - that only came a number of years later though.

 

Well done, that's the one!

 

'Deepest in Africa' was a decoy, it's actually the deepest wine cellar in the world! 857m underground.

 

Yours.

Link to comment
2 names - Mike Ulner and Dave Teague - and a date - 3/5/2000 - are synonymous with what?

 

Hey this question was asked by tomtwogates on 20 Dec 2009 and answered by Cape Doc on 21 December.

 

In doing my google research I cam across this take - interesting - http://is.gd/7jnmt (if the question stands and you follow this link you automatically disqualify yourself from answering ;))

 

I am sure it will still flummox the masses - I did not get it but I remember we had had it before.

 

Cincol why not ask a new question?

 

Trev

Edited by trevorh7000
Link to comment

Magellan

1987 ?

 

Spot on!! The year was 1989.

 

Some trivia

 

According to the institute of navigation navigation museum, the first commercial GPSr was the TI 4100 NAVSTAR Navigator (1981)

 

Of course it doesn't look anything like the GPSr's we use today, and thankfully we do not have to cache with something like it, need a backpack to carry the darn thing. Of course it only ran on the test bed of 6 satellites.

 

Continue DBob :lostsignal:

Link to comment

Magellan

1987 ?

 

Spot on!! The year was 1989.

 

Some trivia

 

According to the institute of navigation navigation museum, the first commercial GPSr was the TI 4100 NAVSTAR Navigator (1981)

 

Of course it doesn't look anything like the GPSr's we use today, and thankfully we do not have to cache with something like it, need a backpack to carry the darn thing. Of course it only ran on the test bed of 6 satellites.

 

Continue DBob :lostsignal:

 

Yep GR you are right, BUT I was looking for the 1st commercially available HANDHELD which was the Magellan - 1989 Magellan NAV 1000 introduced as the world's first commercial handheld GPS receiver. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thales_Navigation

Edited by cincol
Link to comment

wicked! Funny thing is I put 1989 and then changed it ! At least it was still in range.

 

Ok heres an interesting one.

The following sentence is the sentence with the most number of times you can repeat the same word in a row in English. Please add the correct punctuation for the sentence to make sense:

 

"John where Jack had had had had had had had had had had had the teachers approval"

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 17
×
×
  • Create New...