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South African (Off-Topic) Quiz


DamhuisClan
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WOW - that was a pure guess based on where you had been caching recently! :laughing:

And where others will be caching soon, I hope.... :P

We're planning to hide a cache near Adam's Calendar on Monday.

 

Stonehenge has a famous "brother" in County Cork in Ireland. What is it called? {Either of the 2 names it is known by will be acceptable}

I should know the answer - this is the topic of an "armchair" virtual cache.

But I don't - wish I still had a memory.... :D

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There's a local cache here that mentions the Drombeg Stone Circle, so will go with that.

 

GR - spot on and the local cache that you are referring to is that Mystery Cache [i think Crystal Fairy's] Aspiring Stonehenge near Hartebeespoort Dam. Did it a while back and remembered the link between the two after solving the puzzle.

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There's a local cache here that mentions the Drombeg Stone Circle, so will go with that.

 

GR - spot on and the local cache that you are referring to is that Mystery Cache [i think Crystal Fairy's] Aspiring Stonehenge near Hartebeespoort Dam. Did it a while back and remembered the link between the two after solving the puzzle.

Aha, that's the cache I was thinking of too. Found it about 2 years ago.

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Greek - mmmm?

 

Maybe the master of the liner Oceanos that went down somewhere off our coast?

 

That would be the one, but he will be most remembered for what?

Deserting his ship and passengers, and letting them fend for themselves...?

He didn't understand "captain goes down with the ship".

 

Saw a rehash on Discovery a week or two ago - think he went through legal proceedings, but don't know what came of that.

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Didn't he kill Verwoed?

 

Wasn't it a Safendis who killed Verwoerd? I think he died a couple of years back.

 

Yiannis Avranas sounds like some Greek pirate! :blink:

 

Talk about Greek - wasn't the doctor in Captain Corelli's Mandolin not called Yiannis - the guy who took the pea out of the old man's ear and the father of Penelope Cruz (drool...)

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Deserting his ship and passengers, and letting them fend for themselves...?

He didn't understand "captain goes down with the ship".

 

Saw a rehash on Discovery a week or two ago - think he went through legal proceedings, but don't know what came of that.

 

Correct, it was his departure from the Oceanos. On 04 August, 18 years ago the Oceanos cruise liner sank off the Wild Coast leading to the most successful sea rescue ever. This despite the gale force winds and waves whipped up by similar conditions to those that lashed the coast this week. Most passengers made it onto life rafts, with some babies being lowered down in buckets. The rescue was marked by the captain’s departure from maritime tradition – he was one of the first to abandon ship. Afterwards the Greek captain, Yiannis Avranas, said he had to leave the ship before 170 passengers, many of whom were elderly, to manage the rescue operation. Captain Yiannis Avranas was accused by the passengers of leaving hundreds behind with no one other than the ship's onboard entertainers to help them evacuate. Avranas claimed that he left the ship first in order to arrange for a rescue effort, and then supervised the rescue effort from a helicopter.

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That sounds la bit like a bit like one of those made-up words in that book "The meaning of Liff" by Douglas Adams and someone else whose name deserts me. Where they made up words based on English country names. Something like a lingam is the feeling of moroseness you get when you receive tidings that your mother-in-law is coming to visit.

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OK - what is common thread between - Garrick Courtney; Cecil John Rhodes; Manfred De La Rey; Nicholas Quenton-Harper and the Egyptian Pharoahs wife Lostris?

 

Ok - going to take a flier on this. The Courtney's are a family that seem to crop up in a few Wilbur Smith books that I have read in teh past - as has CJ Rhodes. Not too sure about the other 2 names but they might have been mentioned in other books by him. So, my guess that th ecommon thread would be Wilbur Smith.

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OK - what is common thread between - Garrick Courtney; Cecil John Rhodes; Manfred De La Rey; Nicholas Quenton-Harper and the Egyptian Pharoahs wife Lostris?

 

Ok - going to take a flier on this. The Courtney's are a family that seem to crop up in a few Wilbur Smith books that I have read in teh past - as has CJ Rhodes. Not too sure about the other 2 names but they might have been mentioned in other books by him. So, my guess that th ecommon thread would be Wilbur Smith.

Yep - good guess

 

all Wilbur Smith characters

 

You're it

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Its volcanic crater or something?

 

Well done Trevor :wub:

 

The Pilanesberg national park is set in the crater of a long extinct volcano - a fascinating alkaline complex produced by volcanic eruptions some 1300 million years ago. Pilanesberg is one of the largest volcanic complexes of its kind in the world. Its rare rock types and structure make it a unique geological feature. There is an EarthCache located there detailing all the geological aspects - Pilanesberg Alkaline Ring Complex - EarthCache

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The Transvaal Scottish Regiment performed a successful bayonet charge against an enemy in March of 1922.

 

Where did this occur and what was the conflict?

 

I don't know about any military conflicts but 1922 was the infamous Miners' Strike on the Witwatersrand. Perhaps the military [like the recent Kommados] was called upon to assist? :) Did the Jocks bayonet charge the striking miners perhaps? I hope not, but under the British anything was possible I suppose. Where did it happen if that was the case? Probably around the Germiston or South Wits areas where the majority of the mines were. My guess. :D:P

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The Transvaal Scottish Regiment performed a successful bayonet charge against an enemy in March of 1922.

 

Where did this occur and what was the conflict?

 

I don't know about any military conflicts but 1922 was the infamous Miners' Strike on the Witwatersrand. Perhaps the military [like the recent Kommados] was called upon to assist? :) Did the Jocks bayonet charge the striking miners perhaps? I hope not, but under the British anything was possible I suppose. Where did it happen if that was the case? Probably around the Germiston or South Wits areas where the majority of the mines were. My guess. :D:P

 

Yep - close enough - Early March was the Red Revolt - or Rand Revolt.

 

The revolt was around the Communist Party and Labour Unions (predominantly run by white miners0 who objected to the mine owners pushing legislation to allow blacks to start taking lower end miner jobs on the mines.

 

The SA Defence Force was called in to assist quell the uprising. This included the SA Air Force bombing parts of Joburg. The main uprisings were in Fordsburg, Jepper and the East rand. A lot of people were killed - including a number of aussie and Zew Zealand (ANZAC) troops on duty in SA.

 

The Tranvaal Scottish did their bayonet charge against the strikers in Dunswart on the East Rand.

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This will probably be for those of us born before the mid-1960's!! :D

 

What was a "galoob" and in what context was it used? Bonus points to anybody who can remember a few of the "punchlines" that were associated with this. :P

Edited by cincol
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What was a "galoob" and in what context was it used?

 

Haven't we had this Q before?

That little pink mannetjie handed out to kids by a petrol company? Esso? or Caltex I think...

Tiny li'll feet and removable white cap, just big enough to take one peanut.

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What was a "galoob" and in what context was it used?

 

Haven't we had this Q before?

That little pink mannetjie handed out to kids by a petrol company? Esso? or Caltex I think...

Tiny li'll feet and removable white cap, just big enough to take one peanut.

 

Can't recall it having being asked before but if it was, my apologies.

 

Yebo Jors - it was a little mascot for a petrol company - a little larger than an egg and pink. The petrol company was Total if I recall correctly. One of the punchlines was "Use Total oil and get galoobricated!" This was circa 1971 or thereabouts.

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