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South African (Off-Topic) Quiz


DamhuisClan
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Were they not called Liberty Ships? Their purpose was to transport munitions destined for the "front lines" as quickly as possible - mainly on the Trans-Atlantic route.

 

Quite right - you're up Cincol!

 

Heres a pic of the SS John W. Brown - one of only two surviving operational Liberty Ships

 

JohnWBrown.jpg

Edited by trevorh7000
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............... The Transvaal Artiliry regement?

 

Perhaps you are referring to THA - Transvaal Horse Artillery? nice try but no cigar! :)

 

I think Discombob is thinking of the Transvaal Scottish - they are an infantry regiment. Again no cigar! :D

Edited by cincol
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ah-ha so what is Kwetsa then?

Although would ginger beer really be a South African product?

 

The South African product is Stoney Ginger Beer, it's claim to fame is being the strongest ginger beer on the market. It's only generally available in SA and a few African countries... and for you DBob, try the SA store :) According to the product label, Kwetsa refers to the sensation one gets at the back of the throat due to it's strength.

 

There's a story that the Moslems in the Cape used to make a 'Kwetsa drink' i.e ginger beer....allegedly, but this story isn't quoted by Coca cola the makers of Stoney.

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A General Kloppers led a South African regiment at Tobruk. They surrendered - have no idea what their name was though. Is this the lot we are looking for?

They certainly were not the Natal Mounted Rifles which my Dad was in.

 

NMR were [are] a panser [armoured] regiment - not artillery. You are certainly on the right track though. The 2 SA Infantry Division [2SAI] was captured at Tobruk and this particular artillery regiment was part of that Division. Now you have to get the answer after that clue. :D:D

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A General Kloppers led a South African regiment at Tobruk. They surrendered - have no idea what their name was though. Is this the lot we are looking for?

They certainly were not the Natal Mounted Rifles which my Dad was in.

 

NMR were [are] a panser [armoured] regiment - not artillery. You are certainly on the right track though. The 2 SA Infantry Division [2SAI] was captured at Tobruk and this particular artillery regiment was part of that Division. Now you have to get the answer after that clue. :D:D

 

The 2 SA Infantry Division - Artillery Regiment branch :D

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Cape Field Artillery then

 

Almost correct - just 1 word different. :D But through sheer perseverance I suppose that GR must get the nod. :lol:

 

My old regiment, Natal Field Artillery, was part of the 2 SAI Divison that was captured at Tobruk. They then spent the rest of WWII as POW's and consequently saw very little action. Up until fairly recently they were stationed in Old Fort Road in Durban and made up the artillery section of 84 Motorised Brigade. Other well known members of 84 Mod Brig were Durban Light Infantary [DLI], Regiment Port Natal [RPN], 1st City Regiment, etc. After 1995 the SANDF was restructured and they now find themselves part of the 7 Div setup that was based in Kensington - not sure where the HQ is now.

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the frakenstein horrors?

 

Close enough.

 

The novel, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. Mary Shelley created the story on a rainy holiday in 1816 in Geneva, where she was staying with her husband, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and their friend Lord Byron. Byron proposed they each write a gothic ghost story, but only Mary Shelley completed hers. Although serving as the basis for the Western horror story and the inspiration for numerous movies in the 20th century, the book Frankenstein is much more than pop fiction. The story explores philosophical themes and challenges Romantic ideals about the beauty and goodness of nature. Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was published on March 11 in 1818.

 

It is often considered the first fully realized science fiction novel due to its pointed, if gruesome, focus on playing God by creating life from dead flesh. Shelley's Frankenstein has been called the first novel of the now-popular mad scientist genre. Most people refer to The monster as "Frankenstein", whereas the doctor is actually Viktor Frankenstein.

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My clever sister in law Michele who came up with that answer. I'll ask her to set a question!

 

Is it technically legal to ask sister in laws the answer?

Isn't that akin to googling :anitongue:

 

I would not have thought it an issue. What are the thoughts on this forum? Michele is an English teacher and I am sure she did not google (that was the intention) - I thought asking family or looking up in books is OK, as long as one avoids the web. Besides the participants have all had a good shot at it and we were no progressing much. Now I feel bad...

Edited by the pooks
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the frakenstein horrors?

 

Close enough.

 

The novel, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. Mary Shelley created the story on a rainy holiday in 1816 in Geneva, where she was staying with her husband, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and their friend Lord Byron. Byron proposed they each write a gothic ghost story, but only Mary Shelley completed hers. Although serving as the basis for the Western horror story and the inspiration for numerous movies in the 20th century, the book Frankenstein is much more than pop fiction. The story explores philosophical themes and challenges Romantic ideals about the beauty and goodness of nature. Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was published on March 11 in 1818.

 

It is often considered the first fully realized science fiction novel due to its pointed, if gruesome, focus on playing God by creating life from dead flesh. Shelley's Frankenstein has been called the first novel of the now-popular mad scientist genre. Most people refer to The monster as "Frankenstein", whereas the doctor is actually Viktor Frankenstein.

 

I once read this esteemed book, and was struck as to how far removed it is from the typical movie scene of Frankenstein.

In the movies he is always portrayed as a big bad old monster, but the book is more a moving insight into one man's search for love, friends and acceptance in a cruel and unwelcoming world - it just so happens that this poor man looked like a monster.

The book is full of pathos and raw emotion, and I couldn't help but shed a tear at the poor creatures predicament, and had one rooting for the monster, not the crazed villagers.

In fact, I would vouchsafe that far from being a science fiction novel, this book can classified as a poignant and profound look into man's inhumanity to man.

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My clever sister in law Michele who came up with that answer. I'll ask her to set a question!

 

Is it technically legal to ask sister in laws the answer?

Isn't that akin to googling :laughing:

 

I would not have thought it an issue. What are the thoughts on this forum? Michele is an English teacher and I am sure she did not google (that was the intention) - I thought asking family or looking up in books is OK, as long as one avoids the web. Besides the participants have all had a good shot at it and we were no progressing much. Now I feel bad...

 

You were using your network - and not the electronic one :anitongue:

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My clever sister in law Michele who came up with that answer. I'll ask her to set a question!

 

Is it technically legal to ask sister in laws the answer?

Isn't that akin to googling :anitongue:

 

Previously in this thread it was mentioned that consulting books was okay.

Don't see any problem with asking someone else for assisiance as long as they don't use Google.

Go for it Lawrence!

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