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Astro5

Hiking with a dog?

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Yup, I have'nt ran into many people with dogs, but when i do the majority are nice. Can anyone recomend a good book or website that teaches you how to train tricks or obedience? :huh:

 

A really good book to read about training and obedience is - Don't Shoot the Dog!: The New Art of Teaching and Training By Karen Pryor

 

It is a very good book and very insightful on helping with training your dog. :D

Thanks! i will look into that one. Another one i saw was 101 dog tricks, it's by the same person i think. Anyway, it looks like a good book, and has alot of fun tricks.

After following the tips and tricks, you're going to find as the dog learns from you, you will also have learned from the dog. It will get much easier to train the dog because as you show them a lot of praise for getting it right and a lot of paitence for getting it wrong, they will want to please you more and more. When my departed Snickers got to that point, it took me 10 minutes to teach him how to play dead. He added the groan himself. :huh:

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After many questions to sportside, I now have really been looking into shelties. If I get one it will be in the next few months, i will post how it goes.

 

A sheltie (also called Shetland Sheepdog) for hiking? Depends on the hiking.

 

Everyone in our family has shelties but us so we've known quite a few shelties. We have labs. The reason we don't have shelties:

 

1) Shelties like to bark A LOT--at everything--like the grass growing and an airplane flying over and any funny sound. And it's a high-pitched annoying YAP! We've never had a lab that was a barker.

2) We hike a lot and shelties collect a lot of cling-ons on hikes so they need much more grooming than our labs.

3) They don't have the endurance on a hike that our labs have. When we've hiked with our family, they end up carrying their shelties. Our labs can walk circles around us as can most larger dogs that do a lot of hiking with their owners. Larger dogs can also carry some weight in their own backpack and can handle rough terrain better.

 

Don't get me wrong. I don't dislike shelties. I just don't see them as a good choice for long or extreme hikes. If you are just walking around in your local city park, shelties would be fine.

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I have an 18ish inch tall Sheltie, weighing in around 23lbs - and she isn't overweight. She is oversized... most are 13-15" and under 20lbs.

A sheltie (also called Shetland Sheepdog) for hiking? Depends on the hiking.

 

Everyone in our family has shelties but us so we've known quite a few shelties. We have labs. The reason we don't have shelties:

 

1) Shelties like to bark A LOT--at everything--like the grass growing and an airplane flying over and any funny sound. And it's a high-pitched annoying YAP! We've never had a lab that was a barker.

I've been told I have an oddball... she hardly ever barks, and its a real bark. All the others at the breeder were 'debarked' so I can't comment on how a Sheltie normally sounds, but it would probably depend on size too. Small diaphram, small bark.

2) We hike a lot and shelties collect a lot of cling-ons on hikes so they need much more grooming than our labs.

He's been warned :D But brushing a Sheltie is not hard, checking them for ticks is! They do pick up everything...

3) They don't have the endurance on a hike that our labs have. When we've hiked with our family, they end up carrying their shelties. Our labs can walk circles around us as can most larger dogs that do a lot of hiking with their owners. Larger dogs can also carry some weight in their own backpack and can handle rough terrain better.

The max I have done with mine is six miles, but she was still ready to go. Again, she is oversized - 3 inches taller than the breed standard allows, so terrain is easier for her than a small Sheltie would be. I wouldn't recommend a 13" Sheltie for hiking - they're better for use as slippers.

Don't get me wrong. I don't dislike shelties. I just don't see them as a good choice for long or extreme hikes. If you are just walking around in your local city park, shelties would be fine.

I know he said hiking, but he didn't say how extreme it was...

 

My advice was to make sure its really the dog he wants, and not just pick it for looks. It is a beautiful dog, but they can be a lot of work and not right for everyone. I would also try to get a 'big' Sheltie. The 'standard' calls for 13-16" at the shoulders, many end up much bigger. A lot of Sheltie owners want a small dog, I wanted a bigger dog (a Golden Retriever actually...).

 

Also read everything you can on whatever breed you are looking at. When I was looking I read a few books on some breeds. At the start I wanted a Golden Retriever... read a book and decided it wasn't right at the time. A Sheltie was also chosen because they are never going to be considered intimidating - and someone else is afraid of dogs. I don't regret my dog, but I'm told I don't have a normal Sheltie...

 

The big problem with hiking with a dog like a Sheltie is the hair... ticks around here are a problem. But, if I didn't have my Sheltie, long hair would still be a problem - all of my dog choices had longer hair. I'm not fond of short coated breeds...

 

Most of the dogs I see on the trail are Labs. It's not really the breed for me. For the next dog, I'll probably end up with a mutt...

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After many questions to sportside, I now have really been looking into shelties. If I get one it will be in the next few months, i will post how it goes.

 

A sheltie (also called Shetland Sheepdog) for hiking? Depends on the hiking.

 

Everyone in our family has shelties but us so we've known quite a few shelties. We have labs. The reason we don't have shelties:

 

1) Shelties like to bark A LOT--at everything--like the grass growing and an airplane flying over and any funny sound. And it's a high-pitched annoying YAP! We've never had a lab that was a barker.

2) We hike a lot and shelties collect a lot of cling-ons on hikes so they need much more grooming than our labs.

3) They don't have the endurance on a hike that our labs have. When we've hiked with our family, they end up carrying their shelties. Our labs can walk circles around us as can most larger dogs that do a lot of hiking with their owners. Larger dogs can also carry some weight in their own backpack and can handle rough terrain better.

 

Don't get me wrong. I don't dislike shelties. I just don't see them as a good choice for long or extreme hikes. If you are just walking around in your local city park, shelties would be fine.

Thanks for the input, Most of my hikes are only 2-5miles, so i would'nt consider that extreme. And almost all of my hikes are on well marked flat dirt trails. However, I do agree with the lab being probably the best all around hiking dog, but a bigger dog than 12-16" was'nt really an option. (I've had to big labs before, I thought they were great but some family member dont want a bigger dog. Beacause of how much they eat and poop.) :D So I am looking into a sheltie, but have not made a for sure choice. I have read pretty much the first 10 pages of searches in google, and several books. :)

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After many questions to sportside, I now have really been looking into shelties. If I get one it will be in the next few months, i will post how it goes.

 

A sheltie (also called Shetland Sheepdog) for hiking? Depends on the hiking.

 

Everyone in our family has shelties but us so we've known quite a few shelties. We have labs. The reason we don't have shelties:

 

1) Shelties like to bark A LOT--at everything--like the grass growing and an airplane flying over and any funny sound. And it's a high-pitched annoying YAP! We've never had a lab that was a barker.

2) We hike a lot and shelties collect a lot of cling-ons on hikes so they need much more grooming than our labs.

3) They don't have the endurance on a hike that our labs have. When we've hiked with our family, they end up carrying their shelties. Our labs can walk circles around us as can most larger dogs that do a lot of hiking with their owners. Larger dogs can also carry some weight in their own backpack and can handle rough terrain better.

 

Don't get me wrong. I don't dislike shelties. I just don't see them as a good choice for long or extreme hikes. If you are just walking around in your local city park, shelties would be fine.

Double post

(and still dont know if you can delete posts) :D

Edited by Astro5

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Yup, I have'nt ran into many people with dogs, but when i do the majority are nice. Can anyone recomend a good book or website that teaches you how to train tricks or obedience? :D

 

A really good book to read about training and obedience is - Don't Shoot the Dog!: The New Art of Teaching and Training By Karen Pryor

 

It is a very good book and very insightful on helping with training your dog. :)

Thanks! i will look into that one. Another one i saw was 101 dog tricks, it's by the same person i think. Anyway, it looks like a good book, and has alot of fun tricks.

After following the tips and tricks, you're going to find as the dog learns from you, you will also have learned from the dog. It will get much easier to train the dog because as you show them a lot of praise for getting it right and a lot of paitence for getting it wrong, they will want to please you more and more. When my departed Snickers got to that point, it took me 10 minutes to teach him how to play dead. He added the groan himself. :)

sounds good, so what kind of dog was snickers?

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Thanks for the input, Most of my hikes are only 2-5miles, so i would'nt consider that extreme. And almost all of my hikes are on well marked flat dirt trails. However, I do agree with the lab being probably the best all around hiking dog, but a bigger dog than 12-16" was'nt really an option. (I've had to big labs before, I thought they were great but some family members dont want a bigger dog. Beacause of how much they eat and poop.) :D So I am looking into a sheltie, but have not made a for sure choice. I have read pretty much the first 10 pages of searches in google, and several books. :)

If you can get past most of the stuff found on Google and still want a Sheltie, it may be your breed :)

 

I'll look at the Sheltie books I have and let you know which one was the most useful. With some breeds you can find a lot of different books, Shelties are somewhat limited... Talking to a breeder in your area will also help. A good breeder won't just send a dog with anyone, they want their dogs to find a home.

 

There is a reason Labs are so popular, they do pretty much everything...

Edited by sportside

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Thanks for the input, Most of my hikes are only 2-5miles, so i would'nt consider that extreme. And almost all of my hikes are on well marked flat dirt trails. However, I do agree with the lab being probably the best all around hiking dog, but a bigger dog than 12-16" was'nt really an option. (I've had to big labs before, I thought they were great but some family members dont want a bigger dog. Beacause of how much they eat and poop.) :) So I am looking into a sheltie, but have not made a for sure choice. I have read pretty much the first 10 pages of searches in google, and several books. :)

If you can get past most of the stuff found on Google and still want a Sheltie, it may be your breed :D

 

I'll look at the Sheltie books I have and let you know which one was the most useful. With some breeds you can find a lot of different books, Shelties are somewhat limited... Talking to a breeder in your area will also help. A good breeder won't just send a dog with anyone, they want their dogs to find a home.

 

There is a reason Labs are so popular, they do pretty much everything...

Yup their a very versitile dog.... And you are right, the books are limited theres only 2 at the public library, I think. :D And yes i have gotten by a bunch on google, the only problem im still alittle worried about is that long hair shedding alot. I know you told me how it sheds, and i've read a bunch on google about how it sheds. But it seems a dog with that hair would just be a shedding machine. :)

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Yup, I have'nt ran into many people with dogs, but when i do the majority are nice. Can anyone recomend a good book or website that teaches you how to train tricks or obedience? :D

 

A really good book to read about training and obedience is - Don't Shoot the Dog!: The New Art of Teaching and Training By Karen Pryor

 

It is a very good book and very insightful on helping with training your dog. :)

Thanks! i will look into that one. Another one i saw was 101 dog tricks, it's by the same person i think. Anyway, it looks like a good book, and has alot of fun tricks.

After following the tips and tricks, you're going to find as the dog learns from you, you will also have learned from the dog. It will get much easier to train the dog because as you show them a lot of praise for getting it right and a lot of paitence for getting it wrong, they will want to please you more and more. When my departed Snickers got to that point, it took me 10 minutes to teach him how to play dead. He added the groan himself. :)

sounds good, so what kind of dog was snickers?

We adopted him from a rescue shelter. Quietest one of the bunch. He was a mix of German Shepard and Rhodesian Ridgeback. Quiet, unconditional love, great with animals smaller than him, and wonderful with little kids. It broke our hearts to loose him.

22bb43a6-b21f-41f6-ae71-adbfe42845a7.jpg

Edited by TotemLake

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Yup their a very versitile dog.... And you are right, the books are limited theres only 2 at the public library, I think. ;) And yes i have gotten by a bunch on google, the only problem im still alittle worried about is that long hair shedding alot. I know you told me how it sheds, and i've read a bunch on google about how it sheds. But it seems a dog with that hair would just be a shedding machine. :unsure:

They shed half as much as a cat, if even that much.

 

If you brush a Sheltie every night, it takes two minutes and keeps all the hair where you want it, on the dog or in the trash. If you brush them once a week, you get more hair on other things and brushing is a little more difficult. They don't shed as much as you would think, except that annual pushing of the undercoat, the hair they do lose is just longer then some other dogs. I have been told that German Shepherds shed a lot, and I would have never suspected that. Can't always go by looks...

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Yup their a very versitile dog.... And you are right, the books are limited theres only 2 at the public library, I think. ;) And yes i have gotten by a bunch on google, the only problem im still alittle worried about is that long hair shedding alot. I know you told me how it sheds, and i've read a bunch on google about how it sheds. But it seems a dog with that hair would just be a shedding machine. :unsure:

They shed half as much as a cat, if even that much.

 

If you brush a Sheltie every night, it takes two minutes and keeps all the hair where you want it, on the dog or in the trash. If you brush them once a week, you get more hair on other things and brushing is a little more difficult. They don't shed as much as you would think, except that annual pushing of the undercoat, the hair they do lose is just longer then some other dogs. I have been told that German Shepherds shed a lot, and I would have never suspected that. Can't always go by looks...

Frankly, they all shed, and they all shed a lot. It just takes longer for short hairs to be noticed. :yikes:

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True, very true..I had a dalmatian for 14 years, didnt really do any research. so i thought i would be a low if any shedding dog...NOPE!...It was a shedding machine, shes been gone for 2 years now and theres some white hair....Cant get rid of it! ;)

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Just saw a great review on the following new book by Dr. Bruce Fogle, a veterinarian, in Dogs in Canada, it may help in choosing your dog.

Hope it helps

 

from amazon and other bookstores

"New Dog: Choosing Wisely and Ensuring a Happy Ever After"

by Bruce Fogle (Author)

 

A few reviews

In "New Dog", Dr Bruce Fogle shares the benefit of his 40 years' clinical expertise. Whether choosing a pedigree or a mutt, find out how to make the most of your relationship with your dog and look after its health and well-being. Choose from the best breeds for a wide range of lifestyles from apartment dweller to allergy sufferer. Assess your dog's personality and ensure a stress-free home-coming for all the family. Solve all familiar and less common problems from dog training, feeding, exercise, aggression and fearfulness. Packed with information, "New Dog" includes latest technology such as DNA testing for genetic predisposition to illness.

 

A straightforward guide to welcoming a new dog home.

 

This book establishes a solid timeline for all the key decisions a new dog owner must make, whether adopting a puppy, an adult dog or a rescued dog.

 

Dr. Bruce Fogle provides his time-tested 20 Essential Tips for a Well-Behaved Dog and offers guidance on the 30 most popular breeds (including purebreds, crossbreeds and problem breeds). Careful attention is given to various concerns, such as allergies and urban, suburban and apartment living.

 

New Dog is packed with accurate, up-to-date information and wise counsel on a range of such topics as:

 

Where to find the right dog

Known inherited conditions

Temperament testing and good canine citizenship

Common problems: inappropriate chewing, aggression, boredom

Effective communication

Routine health care and choosing a vet

Expert training sequences to follow and practice

Traveling with dogs and choosing a kennel and a doggy daycare.

More than 300 commissioned color photographs, dozens of useful tips, and recent breakthroughs in veterinary science all make this the ideal guidebook for new dog owners.

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I was just searching for another thread and accidentally came across this one, and thought I'd comment. I don't post much, but I search a lot!

 

I had an experience last summer while hiking with my dog, that convinced me never to bring my dog hiking in unknown territories ever again. I will never camp with her either. Too bad for her I guess...I have a 50lb beautiful bull terrier...

 

I was hiking with my wife down to the Mississippi River in Wild River State Park in MN. We had jsut set up camp, and were hot so we wanted to take a swim. There were no warnings of Mountain Lions anywhere in the park FYI. When we got down the stairs from the campground, finishing up a 10 minute walk and now about 20 yards away from the river, we saw a large cat pouncing through the underbrush, leaping directly at the dog, which was about 20ft in front of us. The cat covered about 50 yards in what seemed like 1 second. It was that fast! I pulled the dog in, and the cat pounced underneath some thick cover; thick enough so we couldn't see it, but it was about 5 yards away, literally. My wife initially thought it was a deer running at us, but after she saw the unmistakable tail, she was-a-freakin out. We walked slowly down to the river, waiting to take a swim if it attacked, but luckily for us (and the dog) it never did. Armed with knives and pepper spray, we tippee-toed back up to the campsite, packed up, and left. We were so scared we didn't even stay the night. Well, I would have, but she wouldn't have slept a wink, and insisted we leave.

 

When stopping at the Ranger Station on the way out, I requested a refund, but only got a refund for the next night. The ranger looked at us in total disbelief, and said, "that would be a first for this park." And basically laughed at us. Then I called the Main MN DNR office to report a sighting. The guy literally said, "we don't take those - they are everywhere." Then he hung up on me, no joke.

 

The funny thing is, on the way back to the campsite, we met another lady hiking with her dog. We told her she might want to be careful as there's a hungry kitty down the path, that was stalking us (probably the dog). She turned white, and told us that our sighting now confirmed her belief that Mountain Lions are living in that park. She told us that last winter she was snowshoeing with her dog down by the river, and on her way back she saw an extra set of prints. She said they looked like large cat prints, but initially dismissed the idea of being stalked by a Mountain Lion there. After the conversation she turned around, and walked briskly with her dog back to her site. On our way out, we saw her packing stuff up, so she was probably leaving too.

 

So that's my story, and I hope it helps you to make a decision. If I do take my dog hiking, I always bring a couple knives; a pocket folder and a RAT RC-6. Some people say guns for mountain lions, but none of those people have actually seen one stalk first hand. Let me tell you: the sheer speed, agility, and nimbleness of that cat convinced me that a handgun will do no good, unless it is still. Considering that they stalk their predators, the chances of me seeing it before it sees me is nil. If I had my gun out ready to fire, and then saw the cat pouncing our way, I still could not have hit it. The best shooter in the world would have a tough time. If the cat decided to attack, and had not paused underneath the ground cover, AND I had a gun, I still say it's too risky when it's wrestling your dog or your spouse to be shooting their direction.

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Dogs, little kids, babies... they are all prey. Keep them close to you and don't stoop to scoop them up. Keep as large looking as possible, even opening up your jacket to catch the wind will impress them enough to shy away. Only if they are really hungry will they try to grab something as large as a full grown human.

 

Keep aware of your surroundings even checking behind you every few minutes. This kind of activity deters them from trying to stalk. There are exceptions and that usually inludes they are sick or very hungry.

 

You did right to report it even if they did nothing about it. You might want to alert the media. They're good for picking up on stories like this.

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I will look into that book, thanks! And all i can say is what a story. I would have been scared something was behind me for the next week! Guess it's good thing I dont really live in Mountain Lion country. The only thing i think i have to worry about would be mad boar, crazy deer, and..........Bigfoot..... :D

Edited by Astro5

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Thanks Rovers3... Just what I need, another dog book. :D

 

The worse thing I have encountered was an unseen animal... we were out in the woods and heard leaves rustling, and some twigs snapping. I never did see anything, but courage was hiding behind me... Later in the same woods I did see a deer (I don't think that was it though).

 

There are coyotes and foxes around here though...

Edited by sportside

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Thanks Rovers3... Just what I need, another dog book. :rolleyes:

 

The worse thing I have encountered was an unseen animal... we were out in the woods and heard leaves rustling, and some twigs snapping. I never did see anything, but courage was hiding behind me... Later in the same woods I did see a deer (I don't think that was it though).

 

There are coyotes and foxes around here though...

:D Yah my Penny did the same thing a couple years back. She sensed something on the other side of a small bump, barked at it, got behind me and barked at it again. :laughing:

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Thanks Rovers3... Just what I need, another dog book. <_<

 

The worse thing I have encountered was an unseen animal... we were out in the woods and heard leaves rustling, and some twigs snapping. I never did see anything, but courage was hiding behind me... Later in the same woods I did see a deer (I don't think that was it though).

 

There are coyotes and foxes around here though...

:laughing: Yah my Penny did the same thing a couple years back. She sensed something on the other side of a small bump, barked at it, got behind me and barked at it again. :D

 

You were a lot bigger then. <_<

 

m

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Thanks Rovers3... Just what I need, another dog book. <_<

 

The worse thing I have encountered was an unseen animal... we were out in the woods and heard leaves rustling, and some twigs snapping. I never did see anything, but courage was hiding behind me... Later in the same woods I did see a deer (I don't think that was it though).

 

There are coyotes and foxes around here though...

:laughing: Yah my Penny did the same thing a couple years back. She sensed something on the other side of a small bump, barked at it, got behind me and barked at it again. :D

 

You were a lot bigger then. <_<

 

m

She hasn't changed even though she's bigger now. I can tell you stories about the stick people. You know the type.... Xmas decorations, BBQ grills, etc.

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I take my black lab(Sierra) everywhere! One of the main reasons I started GCing was to take her on longer hikes; I have a very small backyard, that doesn't work well with a lab; so I have to take her out 6 days a week. She's a great GCer; I don't use a leash, so no tangles, she doesn't run off. I even forget she's with me sometimes. lol

 

I take her to breakfast or lunch at places like Krispy Kreame, Jack in the Box, In N Out Burger, Weiner Schnitchle; any place with outside tables. I just open the bed of the truck, she jumps out and waits by the door while I go in and order; then afterwards, I throw away the gargabe and she jumps back into the bed of the truck.

 

She travels very well! I was thinking about doing like a blog of her travels next year.

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having your dog not on a leash is fine if your dog stops dead in his/her tracks and comes when called so you can leash them... I hike with my dog (always leashed) and he does not get along with big dogs so when we encounter unleashed big dogs on the trail a fight is bound to happen. It happened this past weekend. Should I not bring my dog in the woods when I am the one obeying the leash laws in our state parks? Another thing to think about is some people fear dogs. Should they feel nervous about hiking because you don't leash your dog. I hate unleashed dogs more and more every time I hike...

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having your dog not on a leash is fine if your dog stops dead in his/her tracks and comes when called so you can leash them... I hike with my dog (always leashed) and he does not get along with big dogs so when we encounter unleashed big dogs on the trail a fight is bound to happen. It happened this past weekend. Should I not bring my dog in the woods when I am the one obeying the leash laws in our state parks? Another thing to think about is some people fear dogs. Should they feel nervous about hiking because you don't leash your dog. I hate unleashed dogs more and more every time I hike...

Don't hate the dogs, hate the owners. The dogs only do what's natural and if they are untrained, what's natural is more aggressive.

 

Mine goes unleashed, and she minds commands from anybody hiking with me. That isn't to say I don't have a leash for her. I have been known to use it to protect her from others more than the other way around.

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My dog doesn't really like other dogs; not that she wants to fight them, just basically ignores them; she might stop and smell their butts for a second, but I keep walking and my dog just comes with me; if the other dog is barking or whatever, my dog will go around. I take her to the dog park and she doesn't even play with other dogs, just waits for me to throw the ball. If I'm hiking and a cyclist or jogger comes by, I just whistle and my dog comes to me and I tell her to wait and she waits right next to me until they pass and I say OK. She basically ignores people too, just walks right past them. I do carry a leash with me JIC.

 

She's a great canine citizen; I think that's because I take her so many places; I've even taken her to farmers markets and flea markets; on leash of course; she doesn't jump or eat the food or chew on things.

 

It is true that the owners do need to have voice control if they aren't going to use a leash; I don't have to yell at my dog to get her to come, just a quiet whistle; I can't whistle very well anyway

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Sophia.jpg

 

She comes with me everywhere!! Hiking, camping, festivals.....even to my jobsites. I do leash her when there are people around because she has this way of talking. Not a bark, just a low roo roo. Which gets mistaken for growling. But once people are informed of her habit of talking, and get to meet her, they are tickled. She does tend to pick up burrs but they do come out pretty easily. She, Sophia, even packs her own food on longer/ multi-day hikes. One sharp whistle is all it takes for her to be at my side, watching and listening for the next move.

For years I did all my hiking, camping and such alone. Being female and alone in the woods has made for a few bad encounters but since having my Sophia along, I've not had a single one. Boundless energy, easy to teach, and a darn good foot warmer in the tent at night......she is a great companion.

 

 

 

Finally got the picture to post.

Edited by Lickety-Split

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Sophia.jpg

 

She comes with me everywhere!! Hiking, camping, festivals.....even to my jobsites. I do leash her when there are people around because she has this way of talking. Not a bark, just a low roo roo. Which gets mistaken for growling. But once people are informed of her habit of talking, and get to meet her, they are tickled. She does tend to pick up burrs but they do come out pretty easily. She, Sophia, even packs her own food on longer/ multi-day hikes. One sharp whistle is all it takes for her to be at my side, watching and listening for the next move.

For years I did all my hiking, camping and such alone. Being female and alone in the woods has made for a few bad encounters but since having my Sophia along, I've not had a single one. Boundless energy, easy to teach, and a darn good foot warmer in the tent at night......she is a great companion.

 

 

 

Finally got the picture to post.

Great looking dog, what kind of dog is sophia? <_<

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aaaAAAaaarrrrRRRrrroooOOOoooorrrrRRrrooOOOoooo... is something my wife and i say to each other all the time. it really is! it's how we end most of our emails, letters, and notes. but alas we have two cats and she won't let me have a dog (yet).

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Thank you. Sophia is a tri-colored border collie. We were on the Katy Trail biking up to a pumpkin festival. Sooo much fun! She never gets nervous in big crowds.

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Someone mentioned 101 Dog Tricks. I got it for christmas and it is an excellent book, full of ideas, troubleshooting and groundwork for more complicated tricks.

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Someone mentioned 101 Dog Tricks. I got it for christmas and it is an excellent book, full of ideas, troubleshooting and groundwork for more complicated tricks.

Drop dead is a series of three tricks.

 

Sit, Down, Roll over

 

Start the trick with pointing your finger like a gun and go Bang before you command the three tricks and the dog will Pavlov Bell that trick with the single Bang after a few days of training.

 

Treat each complex trick as a series of simple ones and you will take your pet far.

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We've cached a few times with our dogs, a lab mix and a shiba inu-border collie mix. They love the outdoors, but would run off in a minute unless leashed constantly. They mind well at home, but when outdoors they put you on ignore. Haven't really taken them off the paths -- one of us usually holds them while the other finds the cache.

 

The shiba is game for anything and would walk anywhere, but she's getting old and crippled, and her paws are tender. The lab is tough as nails, but gun-shy and a wimp when it comes to walking through brush or tall grass. Needless to say, their adventures are limited to the back yard and dog park.

 

We've also encountered some people with unsocialized dogs who snarl and growl at every dog that walks by. Even one psycho golden retriever who kept lunging at us and drug the owner around until we left.

 

Both of our dogs came to us later in life, but I suppose if you get them as a pup and break them in right they would be better caching dogs.

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We try to hike/backpack/camp where there'd be a minimum of canine activity save for the wild type (Coyotes of course and now a few wolves back). Generally..ours is very good! I defiantely would like to see her be able to find caches and eventually (cause she LOVES deep snow) join the local Rescue crew!

 

tn_Cache_etc_007.JPG

 

My wife found this cache (above..but Ruby's not far behind..wondering if there's a cookie in there for her! Dan

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c15d989c-12c1-4743-a59d-9ea4c0e05c40.jpg

 

These are Mocha! and Ginger!!.

 

They both love the trails and the look on their faces when I walk out the door without them is near heartbreaking to them. Ginger! is 5.5 yrs old and a golden retrieval; we got her when she was 5 months old. She loves the water. We both found our first cache together and I take her on every trail hike whenever possible.

 

Mocha! is 11 months old and a terrier mix. We got her from a rescue shelter at about 7 weeks of age. She don't like the water much but loves to hit the trails. She is a total daddy's girl, following me everywhere in the house and sticking pretty close to me on the trails. Ginger! will wander off a bit, but does return on command - usually. She has received two rattlesnake avoidance courses that have already paid off on three occassions that come to mind. Mocha! will get her first session this spring.

 

We do alot of off-leash hiking in open preserves, day or night; although for the night hikes, we do avoid the preserves known to have mtn lions. Ginger! and I have done three 15+ mile hikes over the past four years. She is starting to slow down a bit, but still out-hikes me at the end. Mocha! joined us on the last 15-mile hike a month ago and she completely surprised me with her endurance and stamina. We are members of the San Diego Off Leash Meet Up group. We have yet to join them on an outing because they start so late in the day, but I mention this as an available option.

 

You'll find Ginger! and Mocha! on youtube during one of their sparring sessions.

 

Needless to say, I encourage the OP not to rule out visiting a canine rescue shelter. Mocha! has turned out to be quite an impressionable personality in my family.

 

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Yup, I have'nt ran into many people with dogs, but when i do the majority are nice. Can anyone recomend a good book or website that teaches you how to train tricks or obedience? :laughing:

A really good book to read about training and obedience is - Don't Shoot the Dog!: The New Art of Teaching and Training By Karen Pryor

It is a very good book and very insightful on helping with training your dog. :P

 

You'll actually have a good chance of finding this excellent book in the Psychology section of the bookstore. It is a GREAT book for anyone involved in training (dogs, horses, kids, mother-in-laws, etc.) but not a good 'how to training dogs' book. If you can find it, the book "Clicking with your dog' is the application of these techniques, and a MOST EXCELLENT, simple to understand and follow format. It also has all the basic commands you need for a good trail/GeoPet.

 

The only weakness I can think of in this series of books and are the healing and 'follow' commands as these books aren't thinking about field dogs. But the tips you've been getting in this forum are very good - there isn't much else to know, save consistency is the key.

 

Breed does matter. In my experience, breeds with a high need to please need will respond almost immediately to these techniques. Over the years, I've worked with Rotties, Retrievers, and Goldens - if you can get your family to join in the fun of training things can go very quickly.

 

Have fun, but the tips about being in control of your animal are serious... but I like to think of it as Serious Play. Isn't that the heart of geocaching anyway?

 

Take care, Savoy

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Mezzo, my GeoLab

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Arpeggio, future GeoYorkie? (Well, we'll see :o )

Edited by Savoy

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Decided to take my wacky lab on a mild caching run in the woods. Other than getting panicked a few times by briars and some small brush, she did pretty well. Even stopped and waited for me after I dropped the leash (after I told her to 'come' a few times). Might have to try again on some longer walks.

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I almost always cache with one of my dogs. My caching partner from the beginning, until December 2006, died of cancer. She was a black lab mix and she was a great caching dog. I think she was part guard dog and it showed. I am female and cache solo, so it was always a comfort to have her along. She became very good at the "come around" command, which helped her get her leash intangled. Hiking on trails is easy with a dog, but the last 50 feet into brush can be very trying when the dog is leashed. Most public parks require leashes, so you gotta learn to deal with it. After Tally died, I had my wooden nickels made for her so she could still be with me. My 4-year old lab-springer Charlie comes with me now most of the time. He's still working on the "come around" but he's getting it. My 2 year old Lab/Newf Maddie doesn't have a clue

Edited by tesser

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My dog always hikes with me unless I'm in an area that does not allow dogs. Depending on the time of year, weather, and location, he may carry his own water and wear shoes. He loves nothing better than to get out and run and sniff.

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A bunch of great looking dogs, have'nt been able to post because computers been havin some problems. B)

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I had a Golden Retriever hiking partner, and also a Rat Terrier mix (maybe part Jack Russell). Both were great for hiking. Unfortunately they both passed away in 2008. My Golden especially LOVED hiking. Any time we got into a forest or tree-filled area she would get all excited and happy.

I kept them on leash most of the time as a courtesy to other people who may be on the trail and wildlife. I like to use a dog pack on the dogs when hiking. Plus, they can earn hiking/backpacking miles and badges if you do it right! Geocaching with dogs is also a great way to avoid suspicious muggles. I have found that most people ignore you when you are walking with a dog no matter what you're doing, unless they want to come up and ask to pet your dog. People especially avoid you if you have a dog and are carrying a baggie in your hand and seem to be looking for something on the ground... B)

 

Here is some good info about hiking/backpacking with dogs:

 

http://www.dogplay.com/Activities/hike.html

 

http://www.dogscouts1.com/Dog_Activ-_Backpacking.html

 

There is also a good book called "On the Trail With Your Canine Companion: Getting the Most of Hiking and Camping With Your Dog" by Cheryl S. Smith

 

Here is my Golden (Ginger) at the peak of Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks:

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Both dogs, at Smoky Mountains National Park:

ginporocbig.jpg

 

 

I recently adopted a German Shepherd. The only hiking I've taken her on so far was geocaching, here's a pic:

 

starsc.jpg

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Here's my boy hiking/geocaching in Palo Duro Canyon. Yes, we got the cache.

 

PaloDuroRockyonTabletopRock.jpg

 

While there an employee was telling me how often they end up with dead pets because people take their dogs out on hikes without water and the dog doesn't make it back. Very sad. Rocky carries his own water in his pack.

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I hike with my little Chihuahua, Sir Zero. He is GREAT at getting into tight places too! I was shocked at how good he was and how fast he took to it! He has short hair though, easy to keep burs and debris out of. I have 2 Great Danes and they are wonderful! Big but amazing and short haired =)

 

Sir Zero

 

IMG_1286.jpg

 

The clan at the California Beach

 

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My outdoor geocaching/ hiking/ mountain biking dog is an American Pit Bull Terrier. She loves the outdoors and running, so she is perfect for these activities. I even gave her a travel bug for her collar so people can discover her while out caching.

ajaytb2.jpg

 

She has her own Garmin Astro in the case that she chases a squirrel or a deer. It is a good backup in case mine konks out.

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Bob is a 3 1/2 year old Border Collie cross (Greyhound or something similar).

He's the perfect hiking companion as he's bright, obedient and fast. He's never on the lead and I can trust him 100%, though I am a bit cautious near steep drops.

He runs up to me every now and again as if to thank me for such a great walk.

When we come to a trigpoint (concrete pillar benchmark on a peak) he automatically sits by it as he knows he's about to get his photo taken.

He loves to chase squirrels, rabbits, foxes etc and he's fast enough to catch them.

He can jump over high stiles and immediately stops whatever he's doing if you call him. He's even no trouble in a tent.

I would not enjoy hiking half as much if he wasn't there.

My 15 year old Golden Retriever (Sid) has past his hiking days sadly.

PL-006.jpg

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:mellow: Pancho my chihuahua has been on most of my finds so far and he LOVES geocaching.He is very intelligent, when he sees me with my vista hcx in my hand he gets excited and follows me around until we leave.I have to hide it when I'm just playing with it or downloading.When people see me with him they just think it's a guy walking his little dog.In brushy areas I just pick him up and carry him without any problem since he only weighs 7 lbs.

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Also don't forget to take water,food and a towel for muddy feet!

Edited by HOGFEVER

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Rat terriers I would imagine would be good, as long as its not really rocky.

I have one, and let me tell you, you better be VERY active.

They are very active, bark semi alot, and NEED attention. Mine won't even stay outside for more than a few minutes if you're not there with him.

They're VERY HYPER. Like jack russels, cept I think they're bigger.

Smart too. Mine's name is Bubba.

I would LOVE a boxer though. They are pretty dogs, and basically care takers, but NEVER get a mix because purebred they are the best, mixbreed they can be even more dangerous than pitbulls.

Someone posted a picture with a dog, it was wearing...shoes?

do they make dog tennis shoes?

I really want a boxer, chessie, brittnay, or something HUGE like a great dane but I know those probably aren't best for hiking....

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