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Astro5

Hiking with a dog?

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Ive been hiking for awhile, and have been thinking about getting a dog to start coming along. Please feel free to share any comments or guidance, or just discuss hiking with dogs. :)

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I brought my geomutt on only a small handful of caches. She's a s***poo and is quite short with long, fuzzy hair. It was one of the worst experiences of all time.

 

She was constanly getting tangled up under and around trees and logs. She got loaded with burrs and microburrs.

 

It was nice to have the company though.

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Ive been hiking for awhile, and have been thinking about getting a dog to start coming along. Please feel free to share any comments or guidance, or just discuss hiking with dogs. :)

 

I have a 12yr old English Springer. She is up there in years now and we stick to shorter hikes. She has been on boats tourbusses stayed in hotels with us etc. She is always a great companion either in the vehilce or on hike. I do not usually put her on a leash when I hike becasue she is never more than 10 feet away and always comes to my side when I call. She is trained off leash to heel.The kids really enjoy bringing the dog also. She is always ready for a game of fetch or to swim in any available water. This helps when they get bored. She is also a great icebreaker when meeting new people.

The best advice is to train them early and take them with you everywhere. There is nothing worse than an agressive dog or a dog that constantly pulls you and jumps all over everyone.

 

tarbaL

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I have a 6 1/2 year old female Chessie that I go hiking with all the time, short or long hikes, longest 40km. She is almost always off leash on the trails and never wanders away, usually just her and me but occ with my wife also. She just ignores other people and dogs that we meet on our hikes. The worse thing is when there is something smelly close by and as retrievers at apt to do she will roll in it which makes for a miserable ride home for me, she of course thinks that she is in heaven I've started carrying wet-ones in the car just in case.

One thing that really amazes me is her sense of direction, when we finish finding the cache or are ready to return to the vehicle, I say, "Where's the car?" and she gets me back to the exact spot where we entered the trail or the bush if we are bushwhacking.

I agree with tarbal above, spend the time to train your dog early and well esp for off leash hiking. If your dog is well behaved my experience is that no body will complain about it being off-leash even if it's not allowed in that area.

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I have a 6 1/2 year old female Chessie that I go hiking with all the time, short or long hikes, longest 40km. She is almost always off leash on the trails and never wanders away, usually just her and me but occ with my wife also. She just ignores other people and dogs that we meet on our hikes. The worse thing is when there is something smelly close by and as retrievers at apt to do she will roll in it which makes for a miserable ride home for me, she of course thinks that she is in heaven I've started carrying wet-ones in the car just in case.

One thing that really amazes me is her sense of direction, when we finish finding the cache or are ready to return to the vehicle, I say, "Where's the car?" and she gets me back to the exact spot where we entered the trail or the bush if we are bushwhacking.

I agree with tarbal above, spend the time to train your dog early and well esp for off leash hiking. If your dog is well behaved my experience is that no body will complain about it being off-leash even if it's not allowed in that area.

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We have a 9 year old Brittany Spaniel (Rusty). He has gone on a few cache hunts with Ironman114.

 

Rusty enjoys getting out in the woods or just going for a ride.

 

He knows when Ironman114 is getting ready to go on a hike. He will jump in the truck (when the door is left open) and he will wait until he gets to go :blink: or he has to stay home. :anibad:

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I hike and cache with my Sheltie. The long hair means everything sticks to her, but its the same problem in the yard. As mentioned before, she finds her way out of whatever we get into. It's nice to have someone who can smell themselves in those cases when you forgot to waypoint the car. Being an easily spooked breed, I don't let her off leash ever, the woods are no exception. But when I need to get a cache that is going to be tough for her, I just tell her to stay while I make the descent and climb back. She just watches the entire time. I have also tied her to the backpack at times... The aggravation of brushing her is far outweighed by the company in the woods.

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We have a 9 year old Brittany Spaniel (Rusty). He has gone on a few cache hunts with Ironman114.

 

Rusty enjoys getting out in the woods or just going for a ride.

 

He knows when Ironman114 is getting ready to go on a hike. He will jump in the truck (when the door is left open) and he will wait until he gets to go :grin: or he has to stay home. :)

How are the Brittany Spaniel at hiking and being a pet, that is acctually the dog im thinking of getting around January.

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Well, the Brittany is from the Sport Group. It should be just right at home hiking for miles, unless you get the lazy one :blink: They were bred for hunting, so going for hours is in their blood. They are also listed as good companion dogs, neither mean or shy.

 

Do a little research on the breed before you decide - the internet has a lot on whatever breed you are thinking about.

 

Just don't get one from a pet store or from a breeder that doesn't do any testing on the parents. Testing for known genetic defects will save you money in the long run, even if the dog costs more up front. An AKC paper is NOT proof of a healthy animal...

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I hike with my 1 yr. old Mini Aussie and 12 yr. old Border Collie. They usually hike about 100 to 200 feet in front of me which is nice cause they let me know if anything is ahead of me on the trail. If my Aussie is hightailing it back to me, well he's kind of a chicken so it could mean anything but if my Border Collie is running at full speed back to me, it means I better get out the gun :blink:

 

My Border Collie is pretty old now so she can't do the strenuous hikes anymore but when she was a bit younger, she could go all day and was great because I hike/backpack alone alot and she'd growl up a storm if someone got too close or something was around. She's been all over the Western US hiking and flyfishing with me, I'd get another Border Collie in a heartbeat, I'm sure gonna miss her when it's her time. Been faithful since the get go; love her to death.

 

The Tristin my Mini Aussie seems to be doing pretty well up until now, he never gets out of sight, always checking back on me. He scares kinda easily and spends alot of time waiting for me to 'go first' at which time he will try to herd me until it's 'ok' which consists of pushing his nose on my calves. It's kinda cute but I'm always wondering what he is hearing/smelling/seeing that I'm not so it has caused me to get the creeps a few times. I'm really only afraid of running into a sow with her cubs. Tristin has his own gc acct. under Tristin GeoK9

 

Love DOGS!

 

Oh yeah my BC-Dakota has her own dog pack and she hiked in her own food, I carried water in for her if I wasn't hiking along some sort of water source. I didn't weigh it down too heavy and she took to her pack pretty quickly. She ain't much on a leash and collar but never had a problem with her that way. Tristin the Aussie has been through obedience classes and is leash trained, wears a collar and I'll put him on the leash I come up on another hiker with a dog. I bring them a treat too for longer hiking days, give them a little energy boost.

 

Tristin and Dakota on our trip home from GW6 in Cali. On the Coast playing with a stick :(

tristinanddakotacalibeach.jpg

Edited by tsunrisebey
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I have a 6 year old Yellow Lab and he comes for all Hiking Caches. Well really he goes everywhere I go even to work with me. But the hikes he absolutly LOVES and my girls and I love having him with us. Its espcially nice having him along if I'm caching alone. Plus all the antics dogs get into while hiking is endless amuzment!

 

Tigger decided to roll around for a couple minutes while I signed the log.

 

DSC00021.jpg

 

And some other pics:

http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/T...er/DSC00020.jpg

http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/T...er/DSC00016.jpg

http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/T...Caches033-1.jpg

Edited by Coffee Peddlers
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My golden retriever, Jasmin, was the stereotypical blonde in the woods-- not real bright, but very, very pretty. We did some overnight backpacking and some car camping over the years, but she never really took to the leash, and was just too much of a wanderer to trust that she wouldn't get herself lost while chasing that squirrel. Around local places , she was a great walker, as long as I stopped with her every time she wanted to sniff the next smell. Some dogs weren't cut out for backpacking, and I guess I wasn't cut out for training her to be anyhing less than herself, so we got along great...

 

at 11 1/2, she developed cancer in her hip and had to be put down at the beginning of this summer. I'm not ready for another pup yet, but I'm sure the next one will be equally headstrong and will train me to do just as she pleases... Gotta love your dogs!

 

7b09f75b-e8f3-4fca-992d-dcdd3c0094f5.jpg

 

 

The Wisdom of Dogs

 

If a dog was the teacher, you would learn stuff like:

 

When loved ones come home, always run to greet them.

 

Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joyride.

 

Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face to be pure ecstasy.

 

When it's in your best interest, practice obedience.

 

Let others know when they've invaded your territory.

 

Take naps.

 

Stretch before rising.

 

Run, romp, and play daily.

 

Thrive on attention and let people touch you.

 

Avoid biting when a simple growl will do.

 

On warm days, stop to lie on your back on the grass.

 

On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree.

 

When you're happy, dance around and wag your entire body.

 

No matter how often you're scolded, don't buy into the guilt thing and pout..! run right back and make friends.

 

Delight in the simple joy of a long walk.

 

Eat with gusto and enthusiasm. Stop when you have had enough.

 

Be loyal. Never pretend to be something you're not.

 

If what you want lies buried, dig until you find it.

 

When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close by and nuzzle them gently.

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I also have a border collie. She is actually very mild for a BC. BC's are wonderful dogs, but they are not for everyone. They love to please but they also need a job to do.

 

When we are out on trails she runs ahead but doesn't let me get out of site. We have spent a lot of time training in herding and obedience. We don't get to do either anymore, but the training help strengthen the bond between us.

 

Zip doesn't like having her picture taken.

030608024-1.jpg

 

The dog owners prayer:

Lord, help me be the person my dog thinks I am.

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I have a six year-old Australian shepherd, Mabel. I agree with the responses advising to start training early.

 

Aussies are known as "velcro dogs". Mabel follows my wife and me around our house, and is usually never farther than one room away.

 

On the trail she wanders off-leash about fifty yards ahead and constantly returns to check on me. She understands more than a dozen voice commands and some hand signals. A soft clucking noise (tsk-tsk) is all it takes for her to come back and heel. (We did a little clicker training so she responds readily to the clicking noise)

 

a4e07871-5669-4adb-b75e-7d2da384f7df.jpg

Edited by CacheNCarryMA
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My first was a sheppard/ridgeback and my current is a retriever/border collie. Training starts early, and with treats for rewards to eventually be weaned off. Lessons I've learned is don't take your dog off leash until you know in the middle of chasing a squirrel, that hound will stop dead in their tracks at your voice command. This is a life and death must have control over your pet.

 

How do you get there? First you teach the dog to pay attention to you, look to you for guidance, and follow your moves.

 

Start with your dog on a 15 foot lead, if they are prone to do so, let them take the lead. When they reach the end, snap their lead, and walk in the opposite direction. Each time you do this, shorten the lead so they are closer and closer to you each time you change directions to the point they are by your side. This is a first week training. Nothing else. Do it during walks. You're going to look goofy on the sidewalk, but this is an essential first step to teaching your dog to pay attention to where you are going. Don't forget to reward for doing the right thing. Light admonishments for tugging against you but don't drag them. Stop walking and convince them to come to you with the treat. Young pups can't hear low tones very well, so you'll have to speak in a high friendly pitch full of encouragement and praise.

 

Once you have that down, now is the time to teach them voice commands. On the same lead, allow them to get about 3 sidewalk squares in front, them call them back with a light snap of the lead. I make mine make physical contact with my hand before they can take off again. This may take several tries and lots of encouragement. Once they get used to that, train them the same way off leash.

 

Be aware of your neighborhood covenants. Some allow for off leash under voice command as long as you have a leash with you, some don't.

 

Wait, Stop and No are all very serious commands not to be ignored by the animal. They must stop, they must wait until given the Go, and they must understand No means No.

 

This training saved my first dog's life at the top of a mountain when he was chasing a pika and the pika scrambled over an edge. My command in that one moment stopped him cold and had him coming back to me with my heart in my throat. It was 150 feet straight down 15 feet from where he stopped.

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:PI think our 12 year old cache-hund (Border collie called tilley),absolutely loves going out on the hunt, but does look a bit puzzled when I spend more time searching round trees for caches than she does sniffing. The amount of miles we do on footpaths etc is certainly keeping us fit, and the dog. Just thought ,having a dog is a great excuse for looking weird when you have been muggled, we always say that we are looking for the dogs ball, but have been caught out several times as muggles have offered to help. Cheers Kev
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when you have been muggled, we always say that we are looking for the dogs ball, but have been caught out several times as muggles have offered to help. Cheers Kev

 

I bet if you tell them you are looking for dog poop they won't offer to help.

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looks like alot of great looking dogs, I didnt know that many people had border collies. :( The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :anitongue:

 

Does anyone have any experience with a jack russel terrier? I heard they chase everything and can easily run off and get lost?

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The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :anitongue:

The leaves, branches and other debris are the least of my worries with my Sheltie, they just brush out. Checking her for ticks, that is another story... Last week I removed about sixty of the nasty little things after a four mile walk in the woods - our worst outing ever. Every time I moved a few hairs, there were more walking around - only found one attached though. Her hair is starting to get long, next year she will be groomed much shorter during the summer months.

 

There are a lot of nice looking dogs in this thread. I have a soft spot for the Herding breeds...

 

I have no actual experience with Jack Russels, but as I said before - my dog's breed tends to be shy, and easily spooked, I don't trust her off leash. A good online source or book on the breed should be able to answer your questions.

 

Since I never posted a pic in this thread...

 

c70209b1-4669-4f6c-9bc0-385f26b9ed77.jpg

Edited by sportside
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The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :(

The leaves, branches and other debris are the least of my worries with my Sheltie, they just brush out. Checking her for ticks, that is another story... Last week I removed about sixty of the nasty little things after a four mile walk in the woods - our worst outing ever. Every time I moved a few hairs, there were more walking around - only found one attached though. Her hair is starting to get long, next year she will be groomed much shorter during the summer months.

 

There are a lot of nice looking dogs in this thread. I have a soft spot for the Herding breeds...

 

I have no actual experience with Jack Russels, but as I said before - my dog's breed tends to be shy, and easily spooked, I don't trust her off leash. A good online source or book on the breed should be able to answer your questions.

 

Since I never posted a pic in this thread...

 

c70209b1-4669-4f6c-9bc0-385f26b9ed77.jpg

Thats a really great looking dog you've got there, when i said debris in a way i kinda meant ticks,fleas, ect. And theres two things i really dont like.......thats spiders and ticks. :anitongue:
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looks like alot of great looking dogs, I didnt know that many people had border collies. :( The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :anitongue:

 

Does anyone have any experience with a jack russel terrier? I heard they chase everything and can easily run off and get lost?

 

I would suggest a rat terrier rather than a jack. In my opinion, they are one of the top little dogs. Smart, athletic, obedient, and tough as nails but without the long hair. They are great farm dogs and would be great for someone who is semi-active. There are a couple different sizes and "types" so do your research.

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looks like alot of great looking dogs, I didnt know that many people had border collies. :mad: The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :(

 

Does anyone have any experience with a jack russel terrier? I heard they chase everything and can easily run off and get lost?

 

I would suggest a rat terrier rather than a jack. In my opinion, they are one of the top little dogs. Smart, athletic, obedient, and tough as nails but without the long hair. They are great farm dogs and would be great for someone who is semi-active. There are a couple different sizes and "types" so do your research.

Thanks for the input! I will definitely do some research, ive actually got several dogs i have to look into. :anitongue:
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Thats a really great looking dog you've got there, when i said debris in a way i kinda meant ticks,fleas, ect. And theres two things i really dont like.......thats spiders and ticks. :anitongue:

I don't think I have seen a tick in years, and that is with not using Frontline on the cat regularly for the past several years. Maybe it's all the other cats in the neighborhood being protected killing them all off. But ticks are a worry of mine living in Lyme disease country... Usually there are a few ticks found after a hike, last week was the worst I have seen. We will not be back there...

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looks like alot of great looking dogs, I didnt know that many people had border collies. :mad: The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :(

 

Does anyone have any experience with a jack russel terrier? I heard they chase everything and can easily run off and get lost?

 

I would suggest a rat terrier rather than a jack. In my opinion, they are one of the top little dogs. Smart, athletic, obedient, and tough as nails but without the long hair. They are great farm dogs and would be great for someone who is semi-active. There are a couple different sizes and "types" so do your research.

Thanks for the input! I will definitely do some research, ive actually got several dogs i have to look into. :anitongue:

The Rat Terrier is a cool looking dog. Picking a dog breed is one of the hardest things to do, there are a lot of nice dogs out there. For my next dog, it will probably be a mutt. I doubt I could get another Sheltie like Gracie...

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looks like alot of great looking dogs, I didnt know that many people had border collies. :mad: The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :(

 

Does anyone have any experience with a jack russel terrier? I heard they chase everything and can easily run off and get lost?

 

I would suggest a rat terrier rather than a jack. In my opinion, they are one of the top little dogs. Smart, athletic, obedient, and tough as nails but without the long hair. They are great farm dogs and would be great for someone who is semi-active. There are a couple different sizes and "types" so do your research.

Thanks for the input! I will definitely do some research, ive actually got several dogs i have to look into. :anitongue:

The Rat Terrier is a cool looking dog. Picking a dog breed is one of the hardest things to do, there are a lot of nice dogs out there. For my next dog, it will probably be a mutt. I doubt I could get another Sheltie like Gracie...

I've had both a black lab-chow chow mix,and a dalmatian. Some of the best dogs are mutts, and my dalmatian had to be put down from cancers. :mad: Why would'nt you have another sheltie?
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looks like alot of great looking dogs, I didnt know that many people had border collies. :mad: The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :(

 

Does anyone have any experience with a jack russel terrier? I heard they chase everything and can easily run off and get lost?

 

I would suggest a rat terrier rather than a jack. In my opinion, they are one of the top little dogs. Smart, athletic, obedient, and tough as nails but without the long hair. They are great farm dogs and would be great for someone who is semi-active. There are a couple different sizes and "types" so do your research.

Thanks for the input! I will definitely do some research, ive actually got several dogs i have to look into. :anitongue:

The Rat Terrier is a cool looking dog. Picking a dog breed is one of the hardest things to do, there are a lot of nice dogs out there. For my next dog, it will probably be a mutt. I doubt I could get another Sheltie like Gracie...

I've had both a black lab-chow chow mix,and a dalmatian. Some of the best dogs are mutts, and my dalmatian had to be put down from cancers. :mad: Why would'nt you have another sheltie?

I didn't mean that I wouldn't get another Sheltie, more that it probably wouldn't be like her. She isn't really typical of the breed. I'm not really sure if one would live up to the standard she set. I love this dog, even with all her "faults" (oversized, crooked teeth, one straight ear) - all the things that make her perfect :D Without these so-called defects, I wouldn't even have her, she would be in a show ring.

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looks like alot of great looking dogs, I didnt know that many people had border collies. :mad: The only problem i would see with a collie is branches and other debris getting tangled in its fur. :(

 

Does anyone have any experience with a jack russel terrier? I heard they chase everything and can easily run off and get lost?

 

I would suggest a rat terrier rather than a jack. In my opinion, they are one of the top little dogs. Smart, athletic, obedient, and tough as nails but without the long hair. They are great farm dogs and would be great for someone who is semi-active. There are a couple different sizes and "types" so do your research.

Thanks for the input! I will definitely do some research, ive actually got several dogs i have to look into. :anitongue:

she looks like show ring quality! :) But i got a sheltie or collie, i would teach it some agility and things like that. :D

The Rat Terrier is a cool looking dog. Picking a dog breed is one of the hardest things to do, there are a lot of nice dogs out there. For my next dog, it will probably be a mutt. I doubt I could get another Sheltie like Gracie...

I've had both a black lab-chow chow mix,and a dalmatian. Some of the best dogs are mutts, and my dalmatian had to be put down from cancers. :mad: Why would'nt you have another sheltie?

I didn't mean that I wouldn't get another Sheltie, more that it probably wouldn't be like her. She isn't really typical of the breed. I'm not really sure if one would live up to the standard she set. I love this dog, even with all her "faults" (oversized, crooked teeth, one straight ear) - all the things that make her perfect :( Without these so-called defects, I wouldn't even have her, she would be in a show ring.

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She looks like she would do good in a show ring, if i got a sheltie i would teach it some of the show ring agility. :(

(sorry,messed up last post) :anitongue:

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She looks like she would do good in a show ring, if i got a sheltie i would teach it some of the show ring agility. :(

(sorry,messed up last post) :anitongue:

She would qualify for agility. We have worked on some, but its more for fun. Even getting her to do that is a lot of work...

 

It's obvious she was being trained for the show ring (I got her at nine months), she stands in show stance, usually walks very well on a leash, and wasn't trained to sit. Getting her to do that was fun. For a 'smart breed,' she is rather stubborn sometimes... or maybe that is because she knows when there is no food in it for her :mad:

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She looks like she would do good in a show ring, if i got a sheltie i would teach it some of the show ring agility. :(

(sorry,messed up last post) :anitongue:

She would qualify for agility. We have worked on some, but its more for fun. Even getting her to do that is a lot of work...

 

It's obvious she was being trained for the show ring (I got her at nine months), she stands in show stance, usually walks very well on a leash, and wasn't trained to sit. Getting her to do that was fun. For a 'smart breed,' she is rather stubborn sometimes... or maybe that is because she knows when there is no food in it for her :mad:

A brittany is actually one of the breeds ive been loking into. :mad:

can anyone tell me how to put a picture on a post? (kinda a post newb)

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I've been looking at a brittany. :unsure:

Was on my list of potential breeds :ph34r:

 

Whatever purebred dog anyone gets, read up on potential genetic defects and get a dog from a breeder that tests the parents, and the pups (depending on what it is). For example, a Sheltie should be tested for Collie Eye Anomaly, among others. Getting a dog from bloodlines that have tested problem free could save some headache and heartache later down the road. Unfortunately it's not a 100% guaranteed...

 

Mixed breeds are generally free from genetic defects since both parents need to have the gene to pass it on...

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I’ve discovered a few things about bringing dogs.

One I have is gun shy. If she hears a loud noise, she takes off like a bullet. It’s been a problem where a noise like that may happen.

Dogs don’t handle hot sand well. On a death hike as we were hiking out the sun had been pounding on the sand all day. The dogs ran from clump of grass to clump of grass. The grass was thin and sparse.

Dogs don’t rock hop all that well either. They can do fairly good, but when you start having to climb up and down rocks as tall as you they have a limit.

Dogs are tick magnets. If the area might have a tick, they will find it.

You can’t keep dogs from drinking whatever nasty water is in the area. At least they seem to handle it a lot better than we do.

In town it seems dogs on a leash react far more violently to other dogs than dogs off the leash. This one is strange to me. It must get in the way of the natural way dogs have to establish the pecking order.

Dogs will tend to chase critters. That takes training which you don’t know you need until they chase one. This takes time.

No matter how many times you take your dog out to use the bathroom before the hike. The first 500’ or so will loosen them up and they will leave a landmine. My dogs can tell when a hike is going to happen and that changes their natural timing.

Edited by Renegade Knight
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I’ve discovered a few things about bringing dogs.

One I have is gun shy. If she hears a loud noise, she takes off like a bullet. It’s been a problem where a noise like that may happen.

Dogs don’t handle hot sand well. On a death hike as we were hiking out the sun had been pounding on the sand all day. The dogs ran from clump of grass to clump of grass. The grass was thin and sparse.

Dogs don’t rock hop all that well either. They can do fairly good, but when you start having to climb up and down rocks as tall as you they have a limit.

Dogs are tick magnets. If the area might have a tick, they will find it.

You can’t keep dogs from drinking whatever nasty water is in the area. At least they seem to handle it a lot better than we do.

In town it seems dogs on a leash react far more violently to other dogs than dogs off the leash. This one is strange to me. It must get in the way of the natural way dogs have to establish the pecking order.

Dogs will tend to chase critters. That takes training which you don’t know you need until they chase one. This takes time.

No matter how many times you take your dog out to use the bathroom before the hike. The first 500’ or so will loosen them up and they will leave a landmine. My dogs can tell when a hike is going to happen and that changes their natural timing.

From 15 years with dogs i know that most of that is true with almost all dogs. In fact, i lost a dog beacause it was scared of thunder. A big storm rolled around one night, she ran off and never saw her again. :ph34r:

 

How would you go about training a dog to not chase animals? Sounds hard to break them of their instinct. :unsure:

Edited by Astro5
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...How would you go about training a dog to not chase animals? Sounds hard to break them of their instinct. :D

 

I'm not sure. The current book I'm reading has a game called "follow me" that you start when they are puppies. The goal is simple. The dog looks to you first. Other things second. It doesn't change their nature, but it does change their focus. Follow me leads to heal, better leash manners, and better off leash manners. It becomes the base to build from.

 

I didn't play that game with my newest dog. Now I have a lot more work to get him to pay attention to me and stay close unless released, when we walk as opposed to the dog behind the fence in the park that he just has to go visit when we open our front door.

Edited by Renegade Knight
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I find a simple and stern 'No' works wonders for not chasing anything and I have herding dogs. Although mine have had obedience training. They also don't like the horse whip :D

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I take my Aussie with me when I go on hikes, he has been to focus training classes. The easiest way to start your dog on this is to put your dog on a leash and take off walking them, everytime your dog looks up at you, you then praise your dog "thats it". But along with this walk take off in another direction, go left, then straight, then right, then turn around walk the opposite way... with doing this your dog will start to understand and look up at you more (as he/she does praise your dog for doing this).and probably think..... "dang I need to keep looking and staying with this person cause they dont know where they are going"... my Aussie now stays with me on or off leash.

 

as for dogs being more aggressive on leash it stems from the persons holding the dogs back from sniffing each other... and that holding back triggers a defensive train of thought for the dogs.

 

I love hiking with my dog it is the best! As for pickin a breed for yourself look under www.dogbreedinfo.com best of luck to you for finding a breed just for you.... !!!

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I’ve discovered a few things about bringing dogs.

One I have is gun shy. If she hears a loud noise, she takes off like a bullet. It’s been a problem where a noise like that may happen.

Dogs don’t handle hot sand well. On a death hike as we were hiking out the sun had been pounding on the sand all day. The dogs ran from clump of grass to clump of grass. The grass was thin and sparse.

Dogs don’t rock hop all that well either. They can do fairly good, but when you start having to climb up and down rocks as tall as you they have a limit.

Dogs are tick magnets. If the area might have a tick, they will find it.

You can’t keep dogs from drinking whatever nasty water is in the area. At least they seem to handle it a lot better than we do.

In town it seems dogs on a leash react far more violently to other dogs than dogs off the leash. This one is strange to me. It must get in the way of the natural way dogs have to establish the pecking order.

Dogs will tend to chase critters. That takes training which you don’t know you need until they chase one. This takes time.

No matter how many times you take your dog out to use the bathroom before the hike. The first 500’ or so will loosen them up and they will leave a landmine. My dogs can tell when a hike is going to happen and that changes their natural timing.

From 15 years with dogs i know that most of that is true with almost all dogs. In fact, i lost a dog beacause it was scared of thunder. A big storm rolled around one night, she ran off and never saw her again. :)

 

How would you go about training a dog to not chase animals? Sounds hard to break them of their instinct. :D

Here's a few hints. :lol: I find them to be pretty useful.

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I’ve discovered a few things about bringing dogs.

One I have is gun shy. If she hears a loud noise, she takes off like a bullet. It’s been a problem where a noise like that may happen.

Dogs don’t handle hot sand well. On a death hike as we were hiking out the sun had been pounding on the sand all day. The dogs ran from clump of grass to clump of grass. The grass was thin and sparse.

Dogs don’t rock hop all that well either. They can do fairly good, but when you start having to climb up and down rocks as tall as you they have a limit.

Dogs are tick magnets. If the area might have a tick, they will find it.

You can’t keep dogs from drinking whatever nasty water is in the area. At least they seem to handle it a lot better than we do.

In town it seems dogs on a leash react far more violently to other dogs than dogs off the leash. This one is strange to me. It must get in the way of the natural way dogs have to establish the pecking order.

Dogs will tend to chase critters. That takes training which you don’t know you need until they chase one. This takes time.

No matter how many times you take your dog out to use the bathroom before the hike. The first 500’ or so will loosen them up and they will leave a landmine. My dogs can tell when a hike is going to happen and that changes their natural timing.

From 15 years with dogs i know that most of that is true with almost all dogs. In fact, i lost a dog beacause it was scared of thunder. A big storm rolled around one night, she ran off and never saw her again. :lol:

 

How would you go about training a dog to not chase animals? Sounds hard to break them of their instinct. :)

Here's a few hints. :lol: I find them to be pretty useful.

 

Seems to me that I've seen those hints somewhere before. :D

 

Now if I could only train my CATS!

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Fianally, someone who understands! The main reason i do not have a cat. :D

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Fianally, someone who understands! The main reason i do not have a cat. :)

Could'nt agree more. :D

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Just keep in mind that not everyone that you will encounter on the trail loves your dog as much as you do.

 

The best companion dog is one that is well trained and well controlled.

 

I don't have a dog and I do like them, but... I have had some unpleasant experiences with other hikers pets when backpacking. Like the time that I rolled up into a leanto at dusk only to be greeted by a very agressive animal that was off it's leash.

 

Yet I also recall a great pair- a guy and his daushunt (sp?) who were doing some kind of trail running in the Adirondacks. Dam if that short legged guy didn't keep up!

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Yup, I have'nt ran into many people with dogs, but when i do the majority are nice. Can anyone recomend a good book or website that teaches you how to train tricks or obedience? :laughing:

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Edited beacause of a double post.... Sorry :laughing:

Edited by Astro5
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Just keep in mind that not everyone that you will encounter on the trail loves your dog as much as you do.

 

The best companion dog is one that is well trained and well controlled.

 

I don't have a dog and I do like them, but... I have had some unpleasant experiences with other hikers pets when backpacking. Like the time that I rolled up into a leanto at dusk only to be greeted by a very agressive animal that was off it's leash.

 

Yet I also recall a great pair- a guy and his daushunt (sp?) who were doing some kind of trail running in the Adirondacks. Dam if that short legged guy didn't keep up!

 

Was dropping off a couple of TBs yesterday in a cache near an off-leash area in a local park. This is a LARGE area with lots of dogs running around. It always amazes my just how well-behaved these dogs generally are.

 

I don't think I have ever seen so much happiness in one place. :laughing:

 

Not having dogs, it's a great way to experience them, then we can go home without any of the responsibility.

 

The only mishap I had, was when i bent down to pet a boxer, and he jumped at that same moment to lick me. :laughing: His head met my lip...

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Just keep in mind that not everyone that you will encounter on the trail loves your dog as much as you do.

 

The best companion dog is one that is well trained and well controlled.

 

I don't have a dog and I do like them, but... I have had some unpleasant experiences with other hikers pets when backpacking. Like the time that I rolled up into a leanto at dusk only to be greeted by a very agressive animal that was off it's leash.

 

Yet I also recall a great pair- a guy and his daushunt (sp?) who were doing some kind of trail running in the Adirondacks. Dam if that short legged guy didn't keep up!

 

Was dropping off a couple of TBs yesterday in a cache near an off-leash area in a local park. This is a LARGE area with lots of dogs running around. It always amazes my just how well-behaved these dogs generally are.

 

I don't think I have ever seen so much happiness in one place. :ph34r:

 

Not having dogs, it's a great way to experience them, then we can go home without any of the responsibility.

 

The only mishap I had, was when i bent down to pet a boxer, and he jumped at that same moment to lick me. :ph34r: His head met my lip...

OUCH! :laughing: I've had the same thing hapen aswell. And Boxer's are big dogs with an unusually hard head. :laughing:
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Yup, I have'nt ran into many people with dogs, but when i do the majority are nice. Can anyone recomend a good book or website that teaches you how to train tricks or obedience? ;)

 

A really good book to read about training and obedience is - Don't Shoot the Dog!: The New Art of Teaching and Training By Karen Pryor

 

It is a very good book and very insightful on helping with training your dog. :)

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Yup, I have'nt ran into many people with dogs, but when i do the majority are nice. Can anyone recomend a good book or website that teaches you how to train tricks or obedience? ;)

 

A really good book to read about training and obedience is - Don't Shoot the Dog!: The New Art of Teaching and Training By Karen Pryor

 

It is a very good book and very insightful on helping with training your dog. :)

Thanks! i will look into that one. Another one i saw was 101 dog tricks, it's by the same person i think. Anyway, it looks like a good book, and has alot of fun tricks.

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After many questions to sportside, I now have really been looking into shelties. If I get one it will be in the next few months, i will post how it goes.

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