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DNFs


marchmoon
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You could very well have all DNF's if you expect your GPSr to put you right on top of the cache, or if your settings are wrong.

 

Even if you are doing it right, you could have a high DNF rate on micros or on very hard caches.

 

I have about 1,800 finds and there still are days when I DNF on 5 out of 10 tries for the day.

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I think that DNF's are common for everybody regardless of find count.

 

I've been caching since 2001 and am approaching 200 DNFs. It's common

 

Sometimes they are missing, sometimes you just miss them.

 

You can increase your find rate if in the beginning you look for regular sized containers and forget micros

for a while. You also shouldn't rely too much on your GPS. Between your unit's inaccuracy and that of the cache hider's, the cache can be 30, 40, 50 or more feet from where your GPS says it is.

 

Look first where your GPS is telling you to look, but don't stay there. If you come up empty expand your search area.

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Everybody gets DNFs and you should not think of them as failures. Think of them as just continuing the challenge of the cache. There have been times when I have gone back 4, 5, or 6 times. Maybe you were in a hurry that day, maybe your gps was playing follow the bouncing arrow, the main thing is don't give up and don't think DNFs are a bad thing. Nobody is counting and the cache owner actually needs that type of information.

 

-HHH :laughing:

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DNF's are part of the game; if you went fishing and caught one with every cast, you'd soon tire of the sport.

I enjoy going back and reviewing past finds and DNF's, and have even, by reviewing past DNF's, found clues as to where I may have missed something, then go back and find the cache (or Benchmark).

 

Your percentage of DNF's to Finds will improve as time goes by :(

 

Dick

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I would like to add that it is important to log your DNF's because it might alert the owner to a problem. I have a cache that went missing. No one had posted a find in a few weeks. I'd checked about 3 weeks ago and it was fine. Someone emailed me that the couldn't find it, but never posted a DNF. Then two local experienced cachers posted DNF's and I was very suspicious. I went to look and sure enough it was gone. Now I'm wondering how many others might have looked and never posted a DNF. If they had, perhaps I could have fixed this sooner.

 

deb3day

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I feel like a moron sometimes.

I feel especially like a moron when I log my DNF, and the next cacher logs "Easy find!" But, hey, I'm quite capable of tripping over a 1/1, and not finding it. All part of life!

 

I would like to add that it is important to log your DNF's because it might alert the owner to a problem.

 

I canot say that I agree with this statement. Seems very self-serving. There is no requirement that one log a DNF. I do log most (and only most) of mine. That's my prerogative, but there isn't even any guideline suggesting that you do.

I've logged 204 DNFs. 34 were missing. Maybe deb3day is suggesting that I should only record DNFs for caches that I am sure are missing? But that would include two recent ones that were found the next day (Easy find), and one that the C/O checked (I'm pretty sure it's there. Yup. Right where I put it!)

To OP: Yeah. It's part of life. You'll get better at it. Try for some easier ones. But we all have DNFs. Some of us even admit to it!

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I've been at it for five years and still have about a one in ten average with DNF's. 5800 finds and 545 DNF's logged. Someone actually deleted one of mine too, that was the first cache to make it to my ignore list.

Someone deleted your DNF? i wonder why.

 

I have a suspicion but can't be sure, it wasn't more than the basic, 'couldn't pick this one out' variety. It was like 3 or 4 weeks later too.

 

One reason for logging them is that it tells other searchers that the cache might not be as cut and dried as the owner wants them to think it is. My feeling is that this was the case here. The guy didn't want people to avoid his cache which was considerably more difficult than he claimed.

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Hello all,

 

I've just started geocaching this week, basically because I am on vacations with allot of spare time

(my 8 month old child still needs to sleep :laughing: )

and because I own a couple of GPS receivers now, due to mountain biking.

 

I'm taking this thread to ask one question, probably too basic.

 

On my 3rd attempt to find a cache (multi) I failed, so I come home and logged a DNF,

but I was not satisfied, and since it was my last days on vacations in this area,

I got back to the initial coordinates and found out that I had counted one step more than I should

so, I did all the maths, correctly this time, and went to the new final coordinate where there it was.

 

So, now I have a DNF log but I did find the cache. What should I do?

Edit the DNF log and change it to find, or make a new log?

 

Sorry if this is already answered somewhere else, but I searched (not much to be honest)

and didn't find anything (I'm getting used to these last words....) :(

 

Thank you in advance for your help.

 

José - Portugal

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DNF's are part of the game; if you went fishing and caught one with every cast, you'd soon tire of the sport.

I enjoy going back and reviewing past finds and DNF's, and have even, by reviewing past DNF's, found clues as to where I may have missed something, then go back and find the cache (or Benchmark).

 

Your percentage of DNF's to Finds will improve as time goes by :(

 

Dick

Yes, posting DNFs is very important to the cache owner for tracking his/hers cache placements. It is the right thing to do. Happy Trails

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So, now I have a DNF log but I did find the cache. What should I do?

Edit the DNF log and change it to find, or make a new log?

 

Hi Jose, welcome to the game. Just log a find in addition to the dnf you've already logged. In a year from now you can scroll through your logs and see how things progressed over time. Glad to hear you found it before the end of vacation.

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So, now I have a DNF log but I did find the cache. What should I do?

Edit the DNF log and change it to find, or make a new log?

 

Hi Jose, welcome to the game. Just log a find in addition to the dnf you've already logged. In a year from now you can scroll through your logs and see how things progressed over time. Glad to hear you found it before the end of vacation.

 

Thanks! I was happy too, because this cache 1 of 30 spread by all Portugal and only after you find the 30 you have access to the final one.

 

It's really making me whant to complete all of them, after all, Portugal is a smal country. :laughing:

 

I will now log my 4th find.

 

Thank you again. :(

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I would like to add that it is important to log your DNF's because it might alert the owner to a problem.

 

I canot say that I agree with this statement. Seems very self-serving. There is no requirement that one log a DNF. I do log most (and only most) of mine. That's my prerogative, but there isn't even any guideline suggesting that you do.

I've logged 204 DNFs. 34 were missing. Maybe deb3day is suggesting that I should only record DNFs for caches that I am sure are missing? But that would include two recent ones that were found the next day (Easy find), and one that the C/O checked (I'm pretty sure it's there. Yup. Right where I put it!)

To OP: Yeah. It's part of life. You'll get better at it. Try for some easier ones. But we all have DNFs. Some of us even admit to it!

 

Respectfully disagree with this one. A DNF is not self serving, it actually has several useful purposes for the seeker, for future seekers and the owner. Since the cache owner is probably unable to see all the activity at his or her cache first hand, a few consecutive DNFs provides valuable information that maintenance may be needed. The cache might be missing. The area might have changed. As it has been pointed out, a DNF becomes part of the cache history and the seekers history. In reviewing logs, if several experienced cachers are logging DNFs, maybe it might be a good indication that this is not a good time to look for it. For some, it provides an additional challenge and they will go seek it. Many ways to look at it but a DNF is a valuable piece of information. Not logging them is actually a little self serving.

 

Sure, there is no guideline to stating that you log your DNFs but there is no guideline that says that I shouldn't carry around a hippo around in the trunk of my car either. How many functions were created on GC.com that were intended to not be used?

Edited by Team GeoBlast
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Ahhh, you shouldn't be so hard on yourself. DNFs are a good thing. My current most memorable find (GCGOQ3) became sweeter when I found out the last attempt to find was a DNF from almost exactly 1 year ago. I can only wonder how many cachers passed this cache just because of the year old DNF, but just seeing that spot was great enough, the reward for my effort made it that much better. I've logged 2 DNFs this summer at the cache closest to my home (GC88FE), and if it ever stops raining here, I'm going back after it, even if it really is missing. Frustrating? Yes. Motivating to find that sucker?? Absolutely!! Belittling?? Nah!!!! The destination can be rewarding, but don't forget to enjoy the journey!

 

cache on!

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I would like to add that it is important to log your DNF's because it might alert the owner to a problem.

 

I canot say that I agree with this statement. Seems very self-serving. There is no requirement that one log a DNF. I do log most (and only most) of mine. That's my prerogative, but there isn't even any guideline suggesting that you do.

I've logged 204 DNFs. 34 were missing. Maybe deb3day is suggesting that I should only record DNFs for caches that I am sure are missing? But that would include two recent ones that were found the next day (Easy find), and one that the C/O checked (I'm pretty sure it's there. Yup. Right where I put it!)

To OP: Yeah. It's part of life. You'll get better at it. Try for some easier ones. But we all have DNFs. Some of us even admit to it!

 

Respectfully disagree with this one. A DNF is not self serving, it actually has several useful purposes for the seeker, for future seekers and the owner. Since the cache owner is probably unable to see all the activity at his or her cache first hand, a few consecutive DNFs provides valuable information that maintenance may be needed. The cache might be missing. The area might have changed. As it has been pointed out, a DNF becomes part of the cache history and the seekers history. In reviewing logs, if several experienced cachers are logging DNFs, maybe it might be a good indication that this is not a good time to look for it. For some, it provides an additional challenge and they will go seek it. Many ways to look at it but a DNF is a valuable piece of information. Not logging them is actually a little self serving.

 

Sure, there is no guideline to stating that you log your DNFs but there is no guideline that says that I shouldn't carry around a hippo around in the trunk of my car either. How many functions were created on GC.com that were intended to not be used?

 

What I intimated is that it is self-serving of a cache owner to demand that everyone log their DNFs, in order to determine when maintenance is necessary.

I DNFed a cache maybe six months ago. 2nd DNF on it. The cache owner disabled it, until she had a chance to check it out. Yup! Still there! She doesn't need to know that I couldn't find it a second time. It's still there, and very well camoflaged! And I shall look again! This is not to mention those caches with deliberately bad coords. Sorry. Ain't going to inflate your ego! I probably log 90% of my DNFs. That's certainly far larger a percentage than most geocachers. There is no requirement that everyone log their finds, much less that everyone MUST log their DNFs.

 

I can think of many features on GC.com that not everyone uses. No one is required to use them all! I've met several cachers in the field who never logged their finds! Shame on them! Not everyone uses the 'Ignore' feature. Tsk. Tsk. Not everyone uses Pocket Queries. For shame!

I didn't say that they were not meant to be used. What I said is that they are not required to be used.

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I'm new to caching. Actually just started this week and have found 18 so far in my area. Is it typical to have a lot of DNF's when you start out? I feel like a moron sometimes.

Yep. We still get lots of DNFs -- you'd think we'd have the hang of this by now, but no ;)

 

We do log them all. We had a couple in one day last week, and you can tell by reading them which one was fun anyway, and which one wasn't.

 

When we have a bunch in a row, we find that we go to the next one with a very defeatist attitude and give up much sooner than we normally would. So if we have, say, four in one day, we generally decide that we don't have our caching mojo that day, and usually call it quits and go do something else instead.

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I finally found a multi- that I had DNFs two times (logged both times). It was sweet-because I was showing a newbie the sport and it was the only cache left in the town for me to find. It showed that person that trying again is ok. It really helped it was summer and I wasn't digging in massive snow like the other 2 times. ;)

 

Log the Dnfs please-I need the feedback as a hider-so I know to go check on the cache or disable it if I'm out of town. Thanks!

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What I intimated is that it is self-serving of a cache owner to demand that everyone log their DNFs, in order to determine when maintenance is necessary.

I DNFed a cache maybe six months ago. 2nd DNF on it. The cache owner disabled it, until she had a chance to check it out. Yup! Still there! She doesn't need to know that I couldn't find it a second time. It's still there, and very well camoflaged! And I shall look again!

 

A cache owner that demands anything beyond what is is required for a find is likely going to meet with resistance, and someone that does so may be considered self servant. However, it may also be considered self serving not to log a DNF. Logging a DNF is beneficial for several reasons, not just to inform the owner that the cache may be missing.

 

Logging a DNF may tall other cachers that it may be missing.

 

Logging a DNF may tell other cachers that the cache is difficult to find, perhaps more difficult than the published rating.

 

Logging a DNF may tell the cache owner that the difficulty level should be increased, thus providing useful information to others that might want to find (or avoid) it.

 

Providing information along with a DNF log can provide useful information about the current environment. I searched for a cache last weekend that was placed in the spring and now there is a thick patch of thorns at ground zero. The cache is very likely still there but trying to find it this time of year may not be advisable.

 

None of these reasons really benefit the person writing the log but are courtesies that others in the local caching community really appreciate.

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