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I must love geocaching


gerkmax
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My Adventures in Geocaching...

(sorry if this is long and scary, but it's all true)

 

I went back to check for this one particular cache using updated coordinates. Also, I used a different approached to avoid any shady characters commonly found along the easier approach.

 

I climb over a few rocks, and I'm searching around the new coordinates, waiting for the coordinates to stop bouncing.

 

I noticed someone else on the rocks, just south of me, about 20 feet away. I sit down to play off like I'm just looking for a quiet spot to hang out. The guy climbs a few rocks closer. He's now about 12-15 feet away.

 

He's appears to be in his early 30's, latino, clean stylized facial hair, scar down his face, wearing a loose t-shirt, long shorts, some jewelry, clean sneakers... obviously not a homeless person. He has a twig in his hand, tapping at a branch, and looking at me sideways.

 

I decide to move out of where I am, in case he tries anything. As I walk past him, he looks at me. I notice the twig in his hand is actually a SHANK! Yes, a rusty metal spike with a sharpened end! I keep my cool, and put on my best "I'm not that guy to mess with" attitude.

 

I don't want to walk away immediately, as he could still chase me down in this isolated area, so I walk and stand closer to the exit in the fence... like I wasn't nervous. Which I was... VERY much. The guy moves to where he's literally right next to me, less than a foot away from me. Except now he's holding the "handle" part of the shank!

 

He says "sup" and picks at his crotch with his other hand. I say "What's up?" and try to look like I'm not scared at all, looking at the Jersey shore (praying I get magically teleported there).

 

He makes a "humph" sound, as if he was getting his bravado up. I walk about 5 feet away on a rock, thinking "If he stabs me, I'll push him into the river and run like hell, and pray I don't pass out." He takes two steps towards me, I move near the gate. I lean on the top bar, over the hole, trying to look as cool as can be. He looks down the path to the north. I start walking south along the train tracks. As slowly as my near-panic lets me. I'm planning in my head "If I hear him, don't look, just pick up some rocks and try to bean him in the head as much as possible. Don't stop until he's down, then run like holy hell is behind me."

 

About 50 feet away, I glance back, and he's standing by the fence, head poked through the hole, looking at me. I can see the shank in his hand, as it's resting on the bar over the hole, just like I was standing before. Further down, I again look back and now he's next to the tree, picking at it with the shank. When I get back to the park, I call my friend, Augusto, and tell him everything while sweating profusely from more than just the heat and humidity.

 

Seriously... I must love geocaching, because I'm not telling him that "I'm never coming back"... Noooo! I'm saying "I guess we'll have to wait until winter to check this one again."

 

NOTE: Honestly, I'm not as much of a tough guy as you might think. I just read way too many comic books! hahaha!

Edited by gerkmax
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WOW! That's just a little scary. This is one of those reasons why my 9mm or the 22 goes with me.

 

A .22 RIFLE? That would be much too cumbersome for a normal cacher. And a 9mm is just overkill!! I'd think a .22 REVOLVER if anything. I guess here in Upland we are nicer folks to eachother! :D

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Ah. I think I know that cache. Is the blue tent still nearby? I'm told that it can be a tough area, but we never had a problem in the times that we were there. Sparticus06, gun laws are very restrictive in New York City.

 

Very true.

 

I almost always have a firearm with me when caching... unless I want to cross the border into New York.

They do not honor my concealed carry and the laws are tough.

 

I rarely cache urban area to begin with so my biggest concern is bear but if I am heading to NY the gun stays home.

 

- Rev Mike

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AHHH...that's one of the best things about being a LEO! National concealed carry! I would have smiled and continued on while keeping an eye on him. If he had kept coming closer like that, I would have asked him his intentions and let him know that any ill will would not be a good idea. I guess there are perks.

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AHHH...that's one of the best things about being a LEO! National concealed carry! I would have smiled and continued on while keeping an eye on him. If he had kept coming closer like that, I would have asked him his intentions and let him know that any ill will would not be a good idea. I guess there are perks.

 

In New York City a 'national concealed carry' isn't honored - I could be wrong but am 99% sure I'm correct.

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AHHH...that's one of the best things about being a LEO! National concealed carry! I would have smiled and continued on while keeping an eye on him. If he had kept coming closer like that, I would have asked him his intentions and let him know that any ill will would not be a good idea. I guess there are perks.

 

In New York City a 'national concealed carry' isn't honored - I could be wrong but am 99% sure I'm correct.

Your right to carry IS recognized, your police powers are not,

What Does the Law Cover?

 

H.R. 218 amends Chapter 44, Title 18 of the United States Code (“Firearms”). Also known as the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act of 2004, H.R. 218 exempts current and retired law enforcement officers from state laws prohibiting them from carrying concealed firearms (other than machine guns, silencers, or other destructive devices).

 

However, the law shouldn’t be construed as a federal version of “higher duty of care” laws – state statutes stipulating that off-duty law enforcement officers, emergency medical technicians, and similar professionals must intervene in critical situations. “The key point is that the law recognizes law enforcement officers’ status, not their lawful authority,” says Nowicki. Adds Kevin Watson, spokesperson for the LEAA, “If you’re a California police officer carrying in New York, your police powers aren’t recognized, so you’re not bound by the higher duty of care law. But, if you’re an off-duty officer in California, you are bound by the law because the statute does exist and applies to you.” Out of state, Good Samaritan laws should apply to any course of action (or inaction) by a retired or off-duty officer.

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