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Walking sticks


Bluestonecrew
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Anyone use one? Anyone have any recommendations / preferred manufacturer?

I use an aluminum walking stick from Swiss Gear. It is collapsible for easy storage, and has a cork handle and a strap. I bought mine at Walmart, but I see them listed on Amazon. I think I paid less at Walmart.

Edited by UncleJimbo
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I have trekking poles and don't go for long hikes without them. I used a 20% off offer at R.E.I. to get the Leki poles and I recommend that brand. They are worth the price I paid.

 

Some people recommend the inexpensive walking sticks sold at Wal-Mart. I did not have good luck with an inexpensive walking stick . . . it would collapse when I put weight on it . . . :laughing:

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Anyone use one? Anyone have any recommendations / preferred manufacturer?

 

I almost always carry one. They're good for digging in leaves and thumping the ground.

 

Recommendations? 5' long.

 

Manufacturer: Make your own from a sapling. Easy, free, way more fun than something purchased. Google the phrase "Scout Staves" and you should find instructions on making your own.

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Anyone use one? Anyone have any recommendations / preferred manufacturer?

I use an aluminum walking stick from Swiss Gear. It is collapsible for easy storage, and has a cork handle and a strap. I bought mine at Walmart, but I see them listed on Amazon. I think I paid less at Walmart.

 

How sturdy is that, it looks a little flimsy.

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Anyone use one? Anyone have any recommendations / preferred manufacturer?

 

I almost always carry one. They're good for digging in leaves and thumping the ground.

 

Recommendations? 5' long.

 

Manufacturer: Make your own from a sapling. Easy, free, way more fun than something purchased. Google the phrase "Scout Staves" and you should find instructions on making your own.

 

Cool

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Manufacturer: Make your own from a sapling. Easy, free, way more fun than something purchased. Google the phrase "Scout Staves" and you should find instructions on making your own.

 

Not only have I made my own, but it is a travel bug. Use TBHQFW to reference this item.

Edited by wesleykey
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Manufacturer: Make your own from a sapling. Easy, free, way more fun than something purchased. Google the phrase "Scout Staves" and you should find instructions on making your own.

 

Not only have I made my own, but it is a travel bug. Use TBHQFW to reference this item.

 

Now i like that idea alot :laughing:

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Anyone use one? Anyone have any recommendations / preferred manufacturer?

I use an aluminum walking stick from Swiss Gear. It is collapsible for easy storage, and has a cork handle and a strap. I bought mine at Walmart, but I see them listed on Amazon. I think I paid less at Walmart.

 

How sturdy is that, it looks a little flimsy.

It is good as a walking stick, but is not designed to support your full weight, though I have put quite a bit of weight on it occasionally. If you need one more as a full support (like a cane), then this might not be the right one for you.

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We have so many Rattlesnakes is the desert and mountain areas of Southern California that my walking stick is a snake beater first than an aid to walking second. I started with just a old 7 iron golf club but now I use a ski pole that I've had for years. Cache hiders in the San Bernardino Mountains place the finds behind rocks and deep into rock holes or into a tree stump, so we use our hole as a who is in there test. We see a snake just about everytime we go out caching. Jim Ellis, EllisTruss, Hesperia, California

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I use two Komperdell trekking poles. They are lighter than a wooden staff, give you good grip on rocks and best of all they collapse and fit in my pack when I don't need them or they would be in the way. I can also toss them in the suitcase for travel.

 

I just read a study that said using two trekking poles cuts down on knee joint impact by 20 percent. They also reduce the perceived level of exertion. I don't know about the study, but they definitely save my joints particularly when walking downhill and make walking uphill a lot easier.

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I bought a set of the $15.00 walking sticks at WalMart for the Legs and Eyes (son) and I to use while caching...We don't need them for hiking...Don't need to do that to get 99% of the caches around here.

 

They are light and collapsible and come in handy for spiderweb swatting, sticker vine moving, snake beating, hole poking, bush probing and making that lovely "metal on metal" noise when you are looking for the ammo can hidden Georgia style. :rolleyes:

 

I guess if we were going to walk miles on rough ground then we get something better but right now those old Wally World sticks work just fine.

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I made my own from a bamboo pole almost 20 years ago and use it on almost every hike I go on. I cut it to length, sanded it smooth and then coated it with a waterproof veneer. It's lightweight, very sturdy and the only disadvantage is that it isn't collapsible. I have alot of friends who just use a broom handle and seem pleased with that as well.

Edited by XGrunt
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I bought two ski poles at a garage sale. I knocked off the little round thingies on the bottom and they work great!

 

I use one and have the other for my caching partner.

 

The best thing I did to them was attaching velcro (hook side) to the flat tops of the poles. On the bottom of my digital camera I put the fuzzie side of the Velcro. VOILA! Instant camera monopod!

 

We get lots of great pics with both of us in the action and the poles are great for poking in those.........BIG PILES OF STICKS!!! :D

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This is my hiking stick. Found it about 15 years ago out in the woods of Fort Knox, Ky. I have taken my hiking stick everywhere with me. My friend carved in the lizards and turtles on the hiking stick.

 

Its always ice having it with me on steep climbs.

 

My recommendation is finding your own stick and make it home made :D:D

 

IMG_2545.jpg

Edited by Cav Scout
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This is my hiking stick. Found it about 15 years ago out in the woods of Fort Knox, Ky. I have taken my hiking stick everywhere with me. My friend carved in the lizards and turtles on the hiking stick.

 

Its always ice having it with me on steep climbs.

 

My recommendation is finding your own stick and make it home made :D:D

 

IMG_2545.jpg

 

Nice! But I would be afraid it would break at that first knot if i put any weight on it.

Edited by Bluestonecrew
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I don't see any items currently offered but many folks (myself included) have purchased hiking sticks from Wilderness Walkers on eBay. They make very nice sticks in all kinds of woods. I'm not sure why there aren't any available at the moment - I see that their store is still there but no items are in it. I hope they haven't stopped producing hiking sticks. I like mine a lot and they were very reasonably priced.

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I don't see any items currently offered but many folks (myself included) have purchased hiking sticks from Wilderness Walkers on eBay. They make very nice sticks in all kinds of woods. I'm not sure why there aren't any available at the moment - I see that their store is still there but no items are in it. I hope they haven't stopped producing hiking sticks. I like mine a lot and they were very reasonably priced.

 

The real question is how much weight can you put on those sticks?

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One feature of the ski pole not mentioned are the straps at the top of the pole. Using them ski style you squeeze the grip with the straps in between. If your hand slips off the grip you still have control of the pole. When climbing you spread the weight transfer between the pole and your full wrist and hand through the straps.

 

The only problem is my standard ski poles are too long for hiking so a shorter pair would be better.

 

So there you go, better features and performance using ski poles for hiking.

 

PS: I like the velcro idea using the pole as a monopod for cameras. I'm going to try that.

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I'm getting a little wobbly in my old age so I frequently need a shoulder-high pole (or sometimes two!) to get around in the very steep woods and marshy places I like to hide puzzle caches. I often urge seekers of my caches to bring such a pole. Most you can buy are not long enough. You need them most as a 3rd, downhill leg when you're "climbing" down a steep, slippery/gravelly hill. They help going uphill too, in that you use your arms to provide some of the climbing effort. Sometimes you can just find a piece of deadwood along the way. Better though to have one to bring as part of your GC'ing gear. I've used (and recommend) a 5-foot ength of 1 x 2 pine lumber you can get cheaply at any lumber yard. Buy a straight 10-ft length and have them cut it in two right there, usually free. Leave the ends square for less penetration in mud. Sand or whittle the corners smooth and they're ready to use or share.

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Also...

 

(From WIKI...)

 

The wood from White Wax Wood (presumably Ligustrum lucidum) saplings has been prized in China for thousands of years. It is an ideal material from which to fashion staffs, spear shafts, and walking sticks, because it is tough, hard and flexible and can absorb shock without breaking. However, a downside to "Wax Wood" is that it is very vulnerable to wood worm. This can be treated if found early enough with various powders and oils.[citation needed]

 

Japanese and Korean martial artists will typically choose a piece of waxwood cut to be 1/2' - 3/4' above their personal height, and which will have a pointed end (toward the top of the wax wood stalk) and a thicker base. The size and weight of the bo staff is determined by how near or far the staff is cut from the tip of the wax wood stalk.

 

Various kung fu styles also use Wax Wood for many weapons such as; spear shafts, three section staff, poles. Although Rattan is also used.

 

6 ft. finished for $29.95

 

or

 

7 ft unfinished for $10.55

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I don't see any items currently offered but many folks (myself included) have purchased hiking sticks from Wilderness Walkers on eBay. They make very nice sticks in all kinds of woods. I'm not sure why there aren't any available at the moment - I see that their store is still there but no items are in it. I hope they haven't stopped producing hiking sticks. I like mine a lot and they were very reasonably priced.

 

The real question is how much weight can you put on those sticks?

 

I can tell you that they work well for me at 250 lbs...........

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Anyone use one? Anyone have any recommendations / preferred manufacturer?

 

I've used the "Red Swiss Gear" from walmart, but since I've gone through 4 of them, I doubt if I'll get another one of the red ones.

Either they become stuck and end up breaking inside or easily bent to where they cannot collapse anymore.

 

They work great, when they work.

 

The next one I get will be a little more high end than the ones I've been using. I think the old saying; "You get what you pay for" holds true with these sticks I've been purchasing.

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Some people recommend the inexpensive walking sticks sold at Wal-Mart. I did not have good luck with an inexpensive walking stick

I'm pretty rough on equipment, so it didn't particularly surprise me when my red Wally World hiking pole folded in half. It did end up dumping me on my face, as I was using it to brace myself for a crossing when it failed, but I survived. I decided to stick with natural wood staffs, as I am too much of a cheapskate to buy Leki's.

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We have several nice walking sticks, but here's an idea for a cheap but functional one. Get a 1" to 1 1/4" oak dowel from your local home improvement store and put a BMX bike handle bar grip on it. A foot or so of parachute cord or a leather strap can be run through if you want. The final result is a durable, comfortable walking stick for about five dollars. (You don't really want to pry that 20 pound rock off an ammo can with your $50 custom made walking stick, do you? :-)

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I have two different manufaturer versions of the collapsible trekking poles. One, a no-name version sold by Ocean State Job-Lot (A clearing house for overstock, etc.) and the "Swiss Gear" poles sold at WalMart. Both are fairly light, collapse down to just a little more than 2-foot length for storage, or stowing in car. The no-name ones, have a 1-2-turn release on the sections, while the Swiss Gear have a standard multi-turn locking. (Screw-tighten like.), whih is better having had the no-name ones get stuck either extended, or collapsed. The Swiss Gear ones have a mini compass built into the top of the handles. Nice feature, but the compasses are fairly inaccurate. (demagnetized) the no-name ones have a smaller snow foot (think like the bottom of a ski pole, above the tip) whih I found better for support, compared to the larger, more flimsy ones of the Swiss Gear. (they may be interchangeable, ) The road tips are fairly soft on the Swiss Gear poles, which tend to wear faster.. But, I like the hardened tip insert they protect. Nicer for steadying on ice.

 

mileage may vary.. The swiss Gear poles were in the long run, cheaper than the no-names.. ($9.99 for one at Ocean, $14.95 for the pair at WalMart.)

 

Stephen (gelfling6)

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Also...

 

(From WIKI...)

 

The wood from White Wax Wood (presumably Ligustrum lucidum) saplings has been prized in China for thousands of years. It is an ideal material from which to fashion staffs, spear shafts, and walking sticks, because it is tough, hard and flexible and can absorb shock without breaking. However, a downside to "Wax Wood" is that it is very vulnerable to wood worm. This can be treated if found early enough with various powders and oils.[citation needed]

 

Japanese and Korean martial artists will typically choose a piece of waxwood cut to be 1/2' - 3/4' above their personal height, and which will have a pointed end (toward the top of the wax wood stalk) and a thicker base. The size and weight of the bo staff is determined by how near or far the staff is cut from the tip of the wax wood stalk.

 

Various kung fu styles also use Wax Wood for many weapons such as; spear shafts, three section staff, poles. Although Rattan is also used.

 

6 ft. finished for $29.95

 

or

 

7 ft unfinished for $10.55

 

I was going to buy one until I saw $33 something for shipping 3 times the cost of the item for shipping I don't think so.

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If you're looking for woods that are not necessarily indiginous to your geographic region, there is a place that sells Aspen, Basswood, Cedar, Diamond Willow, Hickory, Iron Bamboo, Saguaro Cactus, Sassafras, Sweet Gum and Yucca Cactus.

https://www.treelineusa.com/webpages/walking_sticks.html

(scroll down)

They sell finished or non finished, and their shipping ain't too bad.

No, I am not an agent for Treeline, nor am I affiliated in any way with the company.

I have, however, been a satisfied customer. I bought a Diamond Willow and a Saguaro Cactus staff from them, and by calling them direct, I was able to get them both in sizes considerably larger than what is offered on the website. B)

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There was a geocacher, I believe back in 2003, that made them with a geocache emblem on them. I carved/painted an emblem on a staff I made.

 

Sorry about the short post, trying to figure out how to attach (insert) the pic.

 

Marty (Goldsboro NC)

Edited by Marty.
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Sherlock staffs, expensive but they'll help my big butt up the hill and turn over rocks so I won't have to. They are very strong.

 

I currently have some Swissgear alums but they are not going to help when I really need them. Good for poking holes and stuff but that it about it.. I actually used one of Horsegeeks Sherlock staffs and they are perfect. I just have to go and find some of that buried treasure in West Virginia to pay for one B)

 

- HHH B)

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Anyone use one? Anyone have any recommendations / preferred manufacturer?

 

I almost always carry one. They're good for digging in leaves and thumping the ground.

 

Recommendations? 5' long.

 

Manufacturer: Make your own from a sapling. Easy, free, way more fun than something purchased. Google the phrase "Scout Staves" and you should find instructions on making your own.

 

I'm a cub scout leader and made walking staffs for both myself and my son. We use them all the time, and are even jazzing them up with bits of leather, feathers and beads.

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There was a geocacher, I believe back in 2003, that made them with a geocache emblem on them. I carved/painted an emblem on a staff I made.

 

Groundspeak requires a license agreement for this. I went to all the trouble a year ago to get that license and haven't had anyone ask for the GC.com logo.

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