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Take Precautions


Linknorth
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I am new to geocaching, but I wanted to give some advice to everyone when leaving your vehicle. While caching last week I came back to a site that I was unable to find earlier in the day. When I pulled into the public access site I noticed two brand new trucks parked and empty. I had seen the same two trucks earlier that day and figured the owners were tubing down the river, like most muggles found in this area do. I thought at the time that I should write down the license numbers (Just in case), but then blew it off, because the trucks looked brand new (not a drop of dirt, they had to be muggles up from the city). As I started out to the cache, which was down a hill and about 100 yards from my vehicle, I could hear a vehicle pull into the access. I assumed they were bringing the owners of the trucks back. I could hear them turning their music up and then down and then they left. After still not finding the cache I headed up to my car. I noticed the door ajar on the passenger side. Missing was a purse and cell phone (STOP, don't blame the victim). I know I should not have left anything of value in the car, but since I did I myaswell try to save someone from the same mistake.

1. Know your surroundings

2. Write down any license numbers of cars that are in the parking area.

3. Hide any valuables

4. Lock all doors

 

If anyone wants to add any helpful advice, please do so.

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I am new to geocaching, but I wanted to give some advice to everyone when leaving your vehicle. While caching last week I came back to a site that I was unable to find earlier in the day. When I pulled into the public access site I noticed two brand new trucks parked and empty. I had seen the same two trucks earlier that day and figured the owners were tubing down the river, like most muggles found in this area do. I thought at the time that I should write down the license numbers (Just in case), but then blew it off, because the trucks looked brand new (not a drop of dirt, they had to be muggles up from the city). As I started out to the cache, which was down a hill and about 100 yards from my vehicle, I could hear a vehicle pull into the access. I assumed they were bringing the owners of the trucks back. I could hear them turning their music up and then down and then they left. After still not finding the cache I headed up to my car. I noticed the door ajar on the passenger side. Missing was a purse and cell phone (STOP, don't blame the victim). I know I should not have left anything of value in the car, but since I did I myaswell try to save someone from the same mistake.

1. Know your surroundings

2. Write down any license numbers of cars that are in the parking area.

3. Hide any valuables

4. Lock all doors

 

If anyone wants to add any helpful advice, please do so.

 

So one of these two trucks had the perps that broke into your car? From your story it sounds like some other vehicle pulled into the parking lot, the perp got out of the car, ripped you off and then left. But for some reason you are convinced the owners of the trucks are some how involved in your theft. Could you tell us the rest of the story so it all connects?

 

I agree with most of your advice, but I think #2 is really of limited use, #3 and #4 is common sense.

 

Jim

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3. Don't leave ANY valuables.

4. Don't lock the doors. In fact, roll the windows down if it's not raining. That way you won't have to buy a new window or clean up broken glass. (It goes everywhere!)

 

Thieves, being who they are, won't let a locked door stop them if they think no one's around. They just break the window. A geocaching buddy found that out recently.

 

There's no 'best' answer.

I can't condone violence.

Thieves should be shot.

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3. Don't leave ANY valuables.

4. Don't lock the doors. In fact, roll the windows down if it's not raining. That way you won't have to buy a new window or clean up broken glass. (It goes everywhere!)

 

Thieves, being who they are, won't let a locked door stop them if they think no one's around. They just break the window. A geocaching buddy found that out recently.

 

There's no 'best' answer.

I can't condone violence.

Thieves should be shot.

Many years ago I had a co-worker who had to do this very thing. The car was broken into many times and then she finally started leaving it unlocked so the miscreants could check everything out. No more problems but a bit creepy knowing that others had likely been in the car overnight.

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I don't lock my Jeep (assuming the doors are on). Bad guys will just cut my windows, causing me more expense and inconvenience than otherwise. Of course the most valuable thing in there is a 30 year old 23 channel CB and a 14 year old CD player that has seen about four dashboards in its lifetime. No great loss, I just hope they don't tear stuff up.

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Sorry about your experience. Thanks for trying to warn others.

 

I would add that if you feel at all uncomfortable, no matter how irrational it may seem, listen to your instinct. Go back another day or go find another cache.

 

I'd agree that locking your doors in remote locations justs invites vandalism. It might deter someone in a busy parking lot--though during a recent evening event someone broke into a cacher's car in a busy parking lot. They parked under a light, having read that's safer; unfortunately, it just allowed the car burgler to see what they had left in the car.

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4. Don't lock the doors. In fact, roll the windows down if it's not raining. That way you won't have to buy a new window or clean up broken glass. (It goes everywhere!)

 

I know someone who left his doors unlocked and the thief broke his window anyway. I guess he didn't even bother to try the door.

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5. Do not leave your suction cup mounts for your vehicle GPSr's on the window. They are starting to hit vehicles with the mounts still on the window knowing the GPSr is in the glove box.

 

Sound advice, also if your suction cup mount has left a dirty circle on your windshield like a coffee mug stain, clean this off with a wipe, as it will still indicate a possible GPSr in the car.

 

Or if you're not going to be a long time, open the windows an inch for ventilation and leave a vicious looking dog on the back seat! :unsure:

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I've read a few articles lately about thieves breaking into cars just to take credit cards out purses, wallets, etc. and then leaving the purse/wallet as they found it. The victim sometimes doesn't know the card is missing for maybe several days, at which time large amounts may have been charged to the card. True, most cards have an unauthorized charge limit of liability but there is still all the red tape and frustration to go through to get it straightened out, not to mention possible identity theft.

 

 

Edit spelling error

Edited by KG1960
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I guess I've been lucky. I've parked my car in some very strange places (during my AT backpacking days). She was brand new when I parked her on a dirt road in Virginia, got a ride sixty miles away, and hiked back. Only took me a week (I'm a slow hiker), and she was still in good condition. I've done that seven or nine times. Never had a problem. Or, my sister and I rotating cars across New England. (Cheshire, Ct to Mount Washington, NH.)

On the other hand, I was parked on a pull out, locally. Almost back to the car, I hear loud music. Went running. Car pulled out when I got there. I think he was just waiting for another car. They both had the same logos on the window. But, it had me worried.

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3. Don't leave ANY valuables.

4. Don't lock the doors. In fact, roll the windows down if it's not raining. That way you won't have to buy a new window or clean up broken glass. (It goes everywhere!)

 

Thieves, being who they are, won't let a locked door stop them if they think no one's around. They just break the window. A geocaching buddy found that out recently.

 

There's no 'best' answer.

I can't condone violence.

Thieves should be shot.

Many years ago I had a co-worker who had to do this very thing. The car was broken into many times and then she finally started leaving it unlocked so the miscreants could check everything out. No more problems but a bit creepy knowing that others had likely been in the car overnight.

 

 

She should have set these guys up so the police could catch them in the act.

Edited by village smithy
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