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Creative Caches


Jozii
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We all know about the container shaped like a rock, and we’ve heard of or seen those evil nano caches. But what other ways are there to create creative containers? And what about cool and unusual clues/stages in a multi or puzzle cache? I’m interested in caches that are unique not only in appearance, but in the whole experience of finding the cache. Here are a few I’ve read/heard of, as well as some ideas of my own:

 

1. Library Book – I read about an idea of disguising a book as a library book, and have it be the container (or have a container in it, if there’s a “hole” cut out inside it – poor book!). The book would thus, with permission and agreement from the staff, be put on a library shelf among the other books (but without the code so no mugglers can borrow it :rolleyes: ). Coordinates would have to lead to another container or other kind of clue outside the library, of course.

 

Another thought I had would be to just have the logbook disguised as a library book. That would be easier to create, but perhaps would just make less people sign the book, if the actual container is elsewhere.

 

2. Map – Simply lead the cacher to a real, physical map (homemade or a real printed one but with writing/markers on it). The map would do the rest in a more old-fashioned treasure hunt way. This would, however, require the cacher to return the map (unless several copies were made).

 

3. Night Drive – Instead of a regular night cache (markers to be lit up by a flashlight), I’ve seen a cache which could be done entirely from a vehicle (except maybe for the last part to actually reach the cache). You would simply follow the road and any turns to be made would be lit up by markers using the headlights of the vehicle.

 

4. Audio Clue – A CD or similar with further clues/directions, either as a voice (you?) giving oral instructions or as other sounds. A CD could easily be used in the car, and having the clue placed near the road/parking would make it easy for the cacher to use without other cachers coming and not finding the CD.

 

5. Oral/physical Stage – Instructions would lead the cacher to a physical person (you, or someone who’s agreed to help) who would provide further instructions. This would best be done if the person is situated at a desk or something at work. The page for the cache would then state the working hours of this person, so people know when they can attempt the cache and find the person in question.

 

6. Monkey Puzzle – I read about this at another website. A pipe of some kind would have some sort of separating “wall” inside it, creating two chambers. The two chambers would be connected through a smaller pipe leading from chamber one to chamber two. Chamber one would contain a key, chamber two would have an “exit” (a hole). In order to get to the cache, the key would have to be used. And in order to get the key, you would have to twist and turn the container.

 

The example I read about at the website also had the final container being a part of the monkey puzzle, but I can’t recall how that was constructed.

 

7. Sign Cache – One of my personal favorites. A cacher put up a large sign next to a major road (is that even legal? If not, I don’t recommend you attempting this). The sign was easily seen and in fact quite eye catching, which makes it so special. Getting to it might be more difficult though (as you usually can’t park just beside the road). Upon finding the cache, I believe people were asked to sign the back of the large sign.

 

This idea could also be used in smaller versions. A simple sign on a wall might be something.

 

8. Garden Cache – Many seem to be placing caches in their own gardens. Many like this as they get to meet other cachers in person, while others don’t as you can end up in the wrong garden by poor coordinates, or simply because it feels bad going through someone’s yard.

 

Personally, I like this idea, as I like meeting fellow cachers. However, I’d recommend placing a cache near the home rather than in the private garden…

 

9. Huge Container – Size obviously does matter. Huge containers are cool!

 

So, what other ideas, or additions/changes to the above, do you know of? Any ideas on your own? Please share :D

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Water Tube. A water proof container (match container) sits inside the bottom of a tube (3-5 feet long and about 3-5 inch diameter) with a hole on the bottom and an opening at the top. The tube is strapped to a fence or tree vertically. Only way to get the container with the log is to fill up the tube with water and snatch the container when it floats to the top. The hole on the bottom slowly lets the water seep out.

 

FM Transmitter. Kinda similar to the audio clue except you set up a low powered transmitter that broadcasts the coords or clues to get the cache on a FM radio station.

 

Braille. Well not exactly but it's the closest way to describe it. You use a knotted string that spells out the coords by the # of knots on it. The string can be stapled under a horizontal fenceline or wooden fence.

 

These are but three of many unique caches in my area; the rest shall remain a pleasant surprise.

 

There were two caches in my area that used the library book method. Both are archived because muggles kept finding and stealing the book. A similar setup is to put a log sheet into a reference book. Other methods I've seen involve putting notes in certain books with coordinates for a multi cache.

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I love the water tube idea! But could you explain it a bit further? What prevents someone from not getting the cache in any other way than using water? And what's a water proof match container? Aren't those usually made of paper? :)

 

The Braille idea is cool too! Simple yet a twist to the more common clues :D

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Water Tube. A water proof container (match container) sits inside the bottom of a tube (3-5 feet long and about 3-5 inch diameter) with a hole on the bottom and an opening at the top. The tube is strapped to a fence or tree vertically. Only way to get the container with the log is to fill up the tube with water and snatch the container when it floats to the top. The hole on the bottom slowly lets the water seep out.

 

If the tube is only a three to five in diameter and three to five feet long, you can't get your hands or fingers down there, and if it is a thick, no one can squeeze the tube to get the container to rise to the top, so you have to pour water down the tube to get the container to float where you can grab it. The hole at the top of the tube needs to be a little larger than the size of the container, and the hole at the bottom of the tube has to be very small so the water leaves slowly to allow the container to float. If the hole at the bottom was as big as the hole at the bottom, water would just flow straight through the tube, and the container wouldn't float. Also, to prevent people from taking the tube down in order to turn it upside down, you have to make sure it is tightly secured to the fencepost or tree.

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We all know about the container shaped like a rock, and we’ve heard of or seen those evil nano caches. But what other ways are there to create creative containers? And what about cool and unusual clues/stages in a multi or puzzle cache? I’m interested in caches that are unique not only in appearance, but in the whole experience of finding the cache. Here are a few I’ve read/heard of, as well as some ideas of my own:

 

1. Library Book – I read about an idea of disguising a book as a library book, and have it be the container (or have a container in it, if there’s a “hole” cut out inside it – poor book!). The book would thus, with permission and agreement from the staff, be put on a library shelf among the other books (but without the code so no mugglers can borrow it :) ). Coordinates would have to lead to another container or other kind of clue outside the library, of course.

 

Another thought I had would be to just have the logbook disguised as a library book. That would be easier to create, but perhaps would just make less people sign the book, if the actual container is elsewhere.

 

2. Map – Simply lead the cacher to a real, physical map (homemade or a real printed one but with writing/markers on it). The map would do the rest in a more old-fashioned treasure hunt way. This would, however, require the cacher to return the map (unless several copies were made).

 

3. Night Drive – Instead of a regular night cache (markers to be lit up by a flashlight), I’ve seen a cache which could be done entirely from a vehicle (except maybe for the last part to actually reach the cache). You would simply follow the road and any turns to be made would be lit up by markers using the headlights of the vehicle.

 

4. Audio Clue – A CD or similar with further clues/directions, either as a voice (you?) giving oral instructions or as other sounds. A CD could easily be used in the car, and having the clue placed near the road/parking would make it easy for the cacher to use without other cachers coming and not finding the CD.

 

5. Oral/physical Stage – Instructions would lead the cacher to a physical person (you, or someone who’s agreed to help) who would provide further instructions. This would best be done if the person is situated at a desk or something at work. The page for the cache would then state the working hours of this person, so people know when they can attempt the cache and find the person in question.

 

6. Monkey Puzzle – I read about this at another website. A pipe of some kind would have some sort of separating “wall” inside it, creating two chambers. The two chambers would be connected through a smaller pipe leading from chamber one to chamber two. Chamber one would contain a key, chamber two would have an “exit” (a hole). In order to get to the cache, the key would have to be used. And in order to get the key, you would have to twist and turn the container.

 

The example I read about at the website also had the final container being a part of the monkey puzzle, but I can’t recall how that was constructed.

 

7. Sign Cache – One of my personal favorites. A cacher put up a large sign next to a major road (is that even legal? If not, I don’t recommend you attempting this). The sign was easily seen and in fact quite eye catching, which makes it so special. Getting to it might be more difficult though (as you usually can’t park just beside the road). Upon finding the cache, I believe people were asked to sign the back of the large sign.

 

This idea could also be used in smaller versions. A simple sign on a wall might be something.

 

8. Garden Cache – Many seem to be placing caches in their own gardens. Many like this as they get to meet other cachers in person, while others don’t as you can end up in the wrong garden by poor coordinates, or simply because it feels bad going through someone’s yard.

 

Personally, I like this idea, as I like meeting fellow cachers. However, I’d recommend placing a cache near the home rather than in the private garden…

 

9. Huge Container – Size obviously does matter. Huge containers are cool!

 

So, what other ideas, or additions/changes to the above, do you know of? Any ideas on your own? Please share :)

 

1. I like the idea of using a library book, but I am opposed to tearing up knowledge in order to go geocaching. In order for me to like this cache, the container would have to be a real "fake book" like those safes you see in the movies. I'm sure they exist.

 

2. I love the idea of leading a cacher to a REAL treasure map. That would be the coolest cache, ever. To help with the use of maps, what you may want to do is create a type of blue-print thing that needs to be printed from the cache page and lead cachers to one of those state parks where there is the little marker with the map posted to it. The cachers would have to lay your "blue-print" with notes or markings on it next to or on top of the map on the sign. Another good idea is to create several maps . . . Like take an average of how much traffic you expect in the area (maybe 50 or so) and turn it into a multi-cache. Put one piece of the map in stage one, another piece in stage two, another in stage three, and the final piece in stage four. The completed map would lead to a fifth part of the cache that is the actual FIND stage and have cachers leave their map pieces in this cache. Then, periodically, go back and move the map pieces back to their original locations. This would save you from constantly having to recreate maps to print out, and it would be a 'fun' treasure hunt. However, it would require a good bit of cache maintenance.

 

3. The night drive is an okay type of cache. I'm not sure if it would be something most people would get into. I for one have been spoken to the police many times for stopping and going and turning around on the same road too many times, which may be what you would run into if you had some "clueless" cachers trying to find your cache. This may alert the police to figure out what the heck is going on.

 

4. The audio clue would be weird to me, but it would definitely be unique. Instead of using a CD, you may get several of those memory things you see on the infomercials, where you can put a recording on the little device. As long as other cachers wouldn't record over it, it would keep the sound file at the cache at all times.

 

5. This is a neat idea, but you would have to have your physical person be someone who works with people in a retail environment most likely because most places of work frown on random people walking in who are people who are there for a reason they may not understand. Also, some people may be uncomfortable if you put their name, place, and hours of employment on the Internet. You may want to be the physical person.

 

6. The idea of the Monkey Puzzle confuses me, could you explain it further?

 

7. The sign cache is very interesting, and I would love doing one. The only thing that worries me is mugglers. I think it is legal to put signs along the road advertising things. People do it for yard sales all the time, don't they?

 

8. I don't like caching on people's private property, permission given or not. Meeting other cachers is cool, though.

 

9. Huge containers are super cool!

 

 

:D Just a few opinions! :D

 

Now for some ideas of my own. You could drill into the mouth of a realistic looking snake (preferably a harmless one that looks native to your area!) and put a bison container in it, then just put the snake in a dark log. Warn cachers that if they don't like creepy crawlies they shouldn't do this cache. (This makes for an excellent scare!) People will laugh.

 

Another good idea is to use several Chinese puzzle boxes. These boxes are puzzles and you have to do certain things to get them open. You can leave partial instructions as hints on the log page. Inside several small boxes could be coordinates to a next stage in a multi-cache, or you could purchase one big one for trades. However, Chinese puzzle boxes are almost always made of wood, so you would have to find a way to protect them by using some type of varnish (which may mess up the box) or by putting them in waterproof containers.

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I found the Monkey Puzzle website here :D Better instructions than the ones I gave :)

 

I like the idea of having several pieces of a map to be collected to find the final point. A possible solution to the maintenance problem might be to just print a lot of maps in advance, and stock up whenever needed. Asking the cacher to print their own would also work, as suggested, but one of the rules of geocaching says coordinates must be used (but of course, that can be fixed in some way).

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Refering to the library book. There was one about 6 yrs back So it may be archived now, but it had you go in the library to find the book to get the dewey number that once obtained let you open a lockbox outside. (It was locked with a combination lock that utilized the dewey number as the code in). NO books were harmed in the making of the cache.

 

For the map. What you could do is go to the hobby shop and buy one of those - make your own stepping stone kits. But rather than a plain stepping stone. Etch in the map and place that out where your coords would go to. The person would then make a rubbing of the stepping stone (Put on the cache page that people need to bring x size paper and something to make a rubbing with (Like on cemetery headstones). The map then takes them to the twin trees take a right 30 steps to big rock X marks spot location.

Edited by ComputerCacheBug
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I like the stepping stone idea. That would be really great, especially since I love doing grave rubbings! It would also solve the problem with being wasteful with paper.

 

I know that you probably don't want to put a lot of time into constant maintenance of the cache, but I think the best idea would be to do about 50-100 laminated copies of the map, cut them all into several different pieces and just ask cachers to leave them in the last container, that way you continue to recycle the maps when you move them back to stage one instead of wasting more and more paper to keep them going.

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I like the stepping stone idea. That would be really great, especially since I love doing grave rubbings! It would also solve the problem with being wasteful with paper.

 

I know that you probably don't want to put a lot of time into constant maintenance of the cache, but I think the best idea would be to do about 50-100 laminated copies of the map, cut them all into several different pieces and just ask cachers to leave them in the last container, that way you continue to recycle the maps when you move them back to stage one instead of wasting more and more paper to keep them going.

 

Rescycling like that is a good idea :D

 

I just had another idea: somehow making a LARGE sign on the ground (on an open field, for example) could be cool. Imagine a large number or something laid out in stone. It can either be easily read if seen from high above, or probably if you take a walk around on the ground and get an overview of the image.

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1. Library Book

I like the idea of locating a book and using the Dewey Decimal code to open a lock. Having a physical book holding the cache or the coords? Not something I would do with one of my hides, because I fear it might have significant maintenance issues.

 

2. Map

A puzzle cache I found involved somewhat hidden links embedded in the cache page. Find the links, enter passwords that you determine by solving riddles on the cache page, and "Poof" you've got maps on your monitor. All three maps combine to lead you to the cache.

 

3. Night Drive

Interesting twist. I'd have to ponder this one a while. I'm not really comfortable setting something up that directly impacts how people drive.

 

4. Audio Clue

There's another puzzle around here that requires you to locate a DVD in another cache. Play the DVD and you get the clues needed to find the final. The twist? The owner doesn't advertise where these DVD's have been placed, and asks that other finders not reveal where they place the DVD when they are done with it.

 

5. Oral/physical Stage

If you could find a reliable medium, I think this would be neat.

 

6. Monkey Puzzle

The ones I've heard about always get good reviews.

 

7. Sign Cache

Might run afoul of the "Container" guideline.

 

8. Garden Cache

I don't go onto residential properties to hunt caches, even when invited by the cache page.

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I've found one of 3 podcast caches in my area. You have to download the podcast and bring an mp3 player with you. That was pretty fun.

 

Some good ideas for awesome hides can be found on ebay. Just google geocache. You can find some hollow bolts, fake security cameras, etc. I like the drilled out pine cone.

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7. Sign Cache

Might run afoul of the "Container" guideline.

 

I've thought about it too. Any ideas how it might work better? Someone said they thought it wasn't illegal to put signs near the road, but still, a permanent geocaching sign? Contacting local authorities might be needed... But it will work with the guidelines if the sign has permission to be put up, right? Or would a larger sign interfere with the guidelines in another way?

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7. Sign Cache

Might run afoul of the "Container" guideline.

I've thought about it too. Any ideas how it might work better? Someone said they thought it wasn't illegal to put signs near the road, but still, a permanent geocaching sign? Contacting local authorities might be needed... But it will work with the guidelines if the sign has permission to be put up, right? Or would a larger sign interfere with the guidelines in another way?

Put a log in a plastic baggie taped to the back of the sign. There's a local one which is on the back of a "Lost Dog" sign velcro'd to a power pole. Not the sturdiest container, but at least the log will be dry on sunny days.

 

Then there was the cache where people literally signed a "log" (a piece of a fallen tree with the bark removed) using a sharpie.

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I love the water tube idea! But could you explain it a bit further? What prevents someone from not getting the cache in any other way than using water? And what's a water proof match container? Aren't those usually made of paper? :grin:

 

The Braille idea is cool too! Simple yet a twist to the more common clues :grin:

The tube holding the water only needs to be a little bit wider that the match container or other water proof container. And was pointed out, it needs to be securely fastened so one doesn't turn the tube upside down.

 

Here is a match container; WalMart has them in orange for 88 cents. I like the green ones, but I've only found them online for the same price but you need to get a dozen or so to offset the handling fees.

ch1_lmpasticbox.jpg

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I love the water tube idea! But could you explain it a bit further? What prevents someone from not getting the cache in any other way than using water? And what's a water proof match container? Aren't those usually made of paper? :D

 

The Braille idea is cool too! Simple yet a twist to the more common clues :grin:

The tube holding the water only needs to be a little bit wider that the match container or other water proof container. And was pointed out, it needs to be securely fastened so one doesn't turn the tube upside down.

 

Here is a match container; WalMart has them in orange for 88 cents. I like the green ones, but I've only found them online for the same price but you need to get a dozen or so to offset the handling fees.

ch1_lmpasticbox.jpg

 

Ah, that kind of match container B)

 

Signing a *real* log is an interesting idea :grin:

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1. I like the idea of using a library book, but I am opposed to tearing up knowledge in order to go geocaching. In order for me to like this cache, the container would have to be a real "fake book" like those safes you see in the movies. I'm sure they exist.

 

Psst. [whispered]....books don't have feelings and all books are not created equally....[/whispered]

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1. I like the idea of using a library book, but I am opposed to tearing up knowledge in order to go geocaching. In order for me to like this cache, the container would have to be a real "fake book" like those safes you see in the movies. I'm sure they exist.

 

Psst. [whispered]....books don't have feelings and all books are not created equally....[/whispered]

 

I have done a library book cache but not with a container in it. It was very cool.

 

It was a puzzle cache where the GPS took you to a spot downtown and the description simply said that the only thing you needed was the name of the cache. The name of the cache was something like 910.480 MI. So if you were standing in that one spot looking around, thinking of the title, you would eventually turn and see the library. You went into the library, looked up the book with that DD code, and the book itself was nothing more than the logbook. You opened it up, and saw the logs of all the past finders. I signed the log and loved the cache. VERY cool.

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1. I like the idea of using a library book, but I am opposed to tearing up knowledge in order to go geocaching. In order for me to like this cache, the container would have to be a real "fake book" like those safes you see in the movies. I'm sure they exist.

 

Psst. [whispered]....books don't have feelings and all books are not created equally....[/whispered]

 

I have done a library book cache but not with a container in it. It was very cool.

 

It was a puzzle cache where the GPS took you to a spot downtown and the description simply said that the only thing you needed was the name of the cache. The name of the cache was something like 910.480 MI. So if you were standing in that one spot looking around, thinking of the title, you would eventually turn and see the library. You went into the library, looked up the book with that DD code, and the book itself was nothing more than the logbook. You opened it up, and saw the logs of all the past finders. I signed the log and loved the cache. VERY cool.

 

I would never have guessed that, as I wouldn't have understood what the code was :);)

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1. I like the idea of using a library book, but I am opposed to tearing up knowledge in order to go geocaching. In order for me to like this cache, the container would have to be a real "fake book" like those safes you see in the movies. I'm sure they exist.

 

Psst. [whispered]....books don't have feelings and all books are not created equally....[/whispered]

 

I know books don't have feelings, and you may not feel all books are created equally, but that doesn't mean you need to rip up knowledge that someone else may value more than you. I may not want to read a book on the thermodynamics of pizza, but someone who is opening a pizza restaurant may find it very helpful if they are developing their own tastes. Destroying books is one of the worst things you can do in this culture.

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We are not talking about hand written manuscripts here! Nothing is lost! There is another copy in this world of mass production not to mention the net is there! I found a book safe at a second hand store to make a cache but while I was there I also picked up a book for $1.00 and I gutted it!!!!!!! It was one book in a two volume set and the other did not make it to the store. It was a dictionary and I am sure that all of the info contained in it is replicated many times elsewhere!

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7. Sign Cache

Might run afoul of the "Container" guideline.

 

I've thought about it too. Any ideas how it might work better? Someone said they thought it wasn't illegal to put signs near the road, but still, a permanent geocaching sign? Contacting local authorities might be needed... But it will work with the guidelines if the sign has permission to be put up, right? Or would a larger sign interfere with the guidelines in another way?

 

I like this idea too, but don't see how you could put a sign up beside a road. State DOT's have a right-of-way (not sure exactly how many feet, might differ from state to state) and your sign would have to be outside of that. Maybe if it was on your property or get permission from another property owner. You know how people get those street signs made with their names on them and put them at the end of their driveway? That might work, get 'GEOCACHE STREET' or something pritned on the sign! (Hey, I really like my own idea! LOL)

 

Another note about placing signs, you'd have to be careful about sign ordinances, especially if it's located in an area that is zoned commercial, you could face serious fines. I really like the idea though.

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1. I like the idea of using a library book, but I am opposed to tearing up knowledge in order to go geocaching. In order for me to like this cache, the container would have to be a real "fake book" like those safes you see in the movies. I'm sure they exist.

 

Psst. [whispered]....books don't have feelings and all books are not created equally....[/whispered]

 

I know books don't have feelings, and you may not feel all books are created equally, but that doesn't mean you need to rip up knowledge that someone else may value more than you. I may not want to read a book on the thermodynamics of pizza, but someone who is opening a pizza restaurant may find it very helpful if they are developing their own tastes. Destroying books is one of the worst things you can do in this culture.

 

No. Murder, rape, child molestation, child abuse; THESE are some of the worst things you can do in this culture. A book can be reprinted. Obviously this is off topic... but I think someone may have a priority problem.

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We are not talking about hand written manuscripts here! Nothing is lost! There is another copy in this world of mass production not to mention the net is there! I found a book safe at a second hand store to make a cache but while I was there I also picked up a book for $1.00 and I gutted it!!!!!!! It was one book in a two volume set and the other did not make it to the store. It was a dictionary and I am sure that all of the info contained in it is replicated many times elsewhere!

 

Sometimes the Goodwill or Salvation Army stores will run a sale on books and you can get them for as little as 10 cents. Wouldn't bother me a bit to 'alter' a book like that. Now if it was a classic leather-bound edition of Moby Dick, that would be another story! :D

 

Also, about the large cache containers, most of the large ones we've found were on someone's own property. I can understand that and if I were to make one, you can bet I'd have it somewhere close by as well. So caches like that on someone's yard or property don't bother me, they're cool.

 

I love the ideas in this thread, keep 'em coming!!!

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Books exists in thousands, child abuse is worse, but still, I have to agree that destroying or damaging books, even for a noble cause such as geocaching (!), is something you wouldn't do. I love books!

 

A "yard cache" consisting of a sign near the road? That's a nice idea. The sign might not be as large as one next to a highway, but still interesting as opposed to a regular hidden one...

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I like this idea too, but don't see how you could put a sign up beside a road. State DOT's have a right-of-way (not sure exactly how many feet, might differ from state to state) and your sign would have to be outside of that. Maybe if it was on your property or get permission from another property owner. You know how people get those street signs made with their names on them and put them at the end of their driveway? That might work, get 'GEOCACHE STREET' or something pritned on the sign! (Hey, I really like my own idea! LOL)

 

 

A couple of local geocachers adopted a section of road (they have volunteered to pick up trash along a section of the road) nearby. As is the case for most Adopt-A-Road programs the city added a sign listing the volunteers name, in this case "EH Geocachers". Of course, as soon as the sign went up a cache was placed nearby.

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Books exists in thousands, child abuse is worse, but still, I have to agree that destroying or damaging books, even for a noble cause such as geocaching (!), is something you wouldn't do. I love books!

 

 

I work in a library and have plans to place a cache in the stacks. Rather than deface a book I got a stiff cardboard "fake book" from a craft store. Since we do some book binding/restoration within the library I can get a reasonable facsimile of a cover attached to the outside so it won't stick out with a casual glance of the the book shelves.

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Books exists in thousands, child abuse is worse, but still, I have to agree that destroying or damaging books, even for a noble cause such as geocaching (!), is something you wouldn't do. I love books!

 

A "yard cache" consisting of a sign near the road? That's a nice idea. The sign might not be as large as one next to a highway, but still interesting as opposed to a regular hidden one...

 

Make that in the billions... and who doesn't like books? But that doesn't mean you (the collective you) should put human-like attributes on a book. The bottom line is, books are manufactured, JUST LIKE THE FAKE BOOK that NYPaddler <sp?> mentions. I mean, fake books are made of the same materials as a real book, so why would you think you should be allowed to mutilate a fake book if you think you shouldn't mutilate a real book.

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5. Oral/physical Stage

 

We were just in New Orleans and found GCE02C. Probabbly the best cache we have ever found. The Coordinates took us to the building's security guard. We were a little puzzled, but when we mentioned Geocaching, the security guard picked up the phone and called in a "Code Blue". Any more and I'de ruin it for someone else.

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I know books don't have feelings, and you may not feel all books are created equally, but that doesn't mean you need to rip up knowledge that someone else may value more than you. I may not want to read a book on the thermodynamics of pizza, but someone who is opening a pizza restaurant may find it very helpful if they are developing their own tastes. Destroying books is one of the worst things you can do in this culture.

Use a book with blank pages if it bothers you. In doing research for a library cache we are putting together a cacher shared with me an idea from another cache. Placing a blank book and having each visitor write part of the story. I wonder if the carbon copy log folks would bother with writing a paragraph?

 

I thoroughly enjoyed this [short] thread.

 

We have a puzzle cache that starts at a dime payphone. The puzzle insinuates you need to call a number. (A set of puzzle coordinates - latitude backwards.) A recording congratulates you and gives you new coordinates to continue.

 

Unfortunately i think a lot of people skip it because not everyone "gets" it without physically visiting the given location. I think almost all figure it out once they get there.

 

We like caches that are "outside the box". We try to make them caches that we would like to search for!

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Books exists in thousands, child abuse is worse, but still, I have to agree that destroying or damaging books, even for a noble cause such as geocaching (!), is something you wouldn't do. I love books!

 

A "yard cache" consisting of a sign near the road? That's a nice idea. The sign might not be as large as one next to a highway, but still interesting as opposed to a regular hidden one...

 

(Sorry for going a little off topic here)

 

While I love my books too (this room has nary a wall without book cover), there are some really interesting artistic, decorative things you can do with books... From the simple bookshelf (of which I have made many out of never to be read again thrift store books) to the complex and beautiful, I believe that books can be more than the wonderful words on paper. Why not a geocache? I love this topic because it has given me a lot of ideas about future cache hiding.

 

mrbor

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1. I like the idea of using a library book, but I am opposed to tearing up knowledge in order to go geocaching. In order for me to like this cache, the container would have to be a real "fake book" like those safes you see in the movies. I'm sure they exist.

 

Psst. [whispered]....books don't have feelings and all books are not created equally....[/whispered]

 

I know books don't have feelings, and you may not feel all books are created equally, but that doesn't mean you need to rip up knowledge that someone else may value more than you. I may not want to read a book on the thermodynamics of pizza, but someone who is opening a pizza restaurant may find it very helpful if they are developing their own tastes. Destroying books is one of the worst things you can do in this culture.

 

What if the book was really badly written? Suppose in the beginning there was a major disaster (like a planet exploding) with only a few survivors with a promise that it would never happen again. But then you got bored and flipped to the end, and not only did it happen again, but you noticed that a different contributing editor had only added it to see if anyone was paying any attention.. :ph34r:

Edited by 4wheelin_fool
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If you're worried about defacing books, go with a fake book safe (i.e. fakebooksafe.com, or the like).

 

A possible variation for library caches would be to solve a puzzle that leads to a specific book which you need to access to gain information on the cache, like words on specified pages. Or if you have a good book to donate and can be sure the library will put it on shelf, you could write the coords in an inconspicuous place (sure, the book might not always be on shelf, but thats the breaks).

 

Another way to make a creative cache (and caching experience) is to prepare a cache with a fully fleshed out plot, and have container(s) that are directly relevant to the plot, or decorated in such a way to be relevant. One of my favorites of this type is the Presumed Dead series (GCYKCG).

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2. Map – Simply lead the cacher to a real, physical map (homemade or a real printed one but with writing/markers on it). The map would do the rest in a more old-fashioned treasure hunt way. This would, however, require the cacher to return the map (unless several copies were made).

 

 

Here is a map one that I put together GC18FRY

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