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Poor woman. I was "chased" by a herd of cows just last weekend (I was with the dog), although they were timid enough to run off when I waved my stick at them. I always recce a field if there are cows there for potential escape routes before I enter, and I always stick close to the field edge away from the cows wherever possible, even if this means straying from the PF (or missing out on a cache!).

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Poor woman. I was "chased" by a herd of cows just last weekend (I was with the dog), although they were timid enough to run off when I waved my stick at them. I always recce a field if there are cows there for potential escape routes before I enter, and I always stick close to the field edge away from the cows wherever possible, even if this means straying from the PF (or missing out on a cache!).

 

You're legally allowed to, aren't you, which is good :)

 

Be prepared for cattle to react, and, where possible, walk carefully and quietly around them - do not split up a clustered group.

 

If you have a dog with you, keep it under close control, but do not hang on to it should a bull or cow start acting aggressively.

 

Cattle will usually stop before reaching you. If they do not, just carry on quietly, and do not run.

 

Should a bull or cow come up very closely, turn round to face it. If necessary take a couple of steps towards it, waving your arms and shouting firmly.

 

Above all, do not put yourself at risk. If you feel threatened, find another way round, returning to the original path as soon as is possible.

 

Remember to close gates behind you when walking through fields containing livestock.

 

If you are attacked or suffer a frightening incident, report this to the landowner and the highway authority, and also the HSE and police if it is of a serious nature.

 

Keep the Ramblers’ Association informed of any problems that you experience.

 

Apparently its against the law to say "Beware of the Bull" when there isn't a bull, too! :)

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Apparently its against the law to say "Beware of the Bull" when there isn't a bull, too!

 

Is it OK to not say "Beware of the Bull" if there is one???? :):)

 

They need to say if there is a bull, yes... easier to paint the creature with WARNING I AM A BULL on the side :D

 

If you can't tell a bull from a cow then you have no business being in a field of cattle at all!! :lol:

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This quote by ROSPA taken from the article is IMHO very good advice and exactly what we do

A spokesman for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents said dog walkers can face problems from cows, especially if they have cows have calves with them. She said: “All animals are unpredictable and they can behave in ways you are not expecting. Keep your dog on a lead if you are around animals. If you start to be chased by an animal, let your dog off the lead. That can defuse the situation and is better than trying to protect it.”

Only last Sunday did we have to put this plan into action, and although the situation is still quite scary this action works very well. Chester will become very protective of us and start barking at the cows and herding them away from us, but as soon as he sees we are safe he legs it back to us. Don't know if all dogs will react in the same way or whether it needs to be a big dog for the cows to respond, but it certainly works for us.

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Chester will become very protective of us and start barking at the cows and herding them away from us, but as soon as he sees we are safe he legs it back to us.

 

So you let him off the lead in a field full of cows?? :):)

You obviously did not read the full posting :D

Keep your dog on a lead if you are around animals. If you start to be chased by an animal, let your dog off the lead.
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Following on from this.

 

Every case of cow attackI have heard of or read about in the last 6 or 7 years has involved a person **** WITH A DOG****. From this surely the most sensible advice is, if at all possible leave the dog in the car if you know you are going to be crossing a field of cows

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Following on from this.

 

Every case of cow attackI have heard of or read about in the last 6 or 7 years has involved a person **** WITH A DOG****. From this surely the most sensible advice is, if at all possible leave the dog in the car if you know you are going to be crossing a field of cows

Yes it is good advise, in fact if at the start of a walk we see that we need to cross a field of cows (or horses) we will generally get back in the car and look for an alternative start point or just leave that cache for another day. Unfortunately if you are on a 10 mile circular walk it is unlikely that you will know. But by taking sensible precautions:

 

1) Check field before entering

2) If it contains cattle, try and find an alternative route, even if it means walking along the edge of adjoining field without a path. I'm sure that Mr Farmer would not mind, as it is preferable to his cattle becoming distressed or worse still having an incident on his hands.

3) If there is no alternative, check where the exit is and plan your route before entering. Walk away from the cattle keeping as much distance as possible from them.

4) Keep your dog under control and on a lead, unless the cattle come close and threatening then release the dog. It is the dog that the cattle are interested in and the dog is likely to be far more agile and faster than you are. If the dog is on his lead the cattle will come to him and you as you are attached via the lead. The dog is then likely to get injured as he cannot take evasive action, and as for you, well the OPs article said it all :) .

5) Do not hang about in the field, make your way promptly to the exit.

6) If the cache is in the cattle field, the forget it. If you really cannot forget it then get the dog into the next field, tie it to a tree/post and then go back for the cache.

 

The above is my opinion based on my experiences and may not work for all situations or be suitable for all dogs, but it has worked for me.

Edited by Phillimore Clan
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"Cattle will usually stop before reaching you. If they do not, just carry on quietly, and do not run. "

 

The rest of the advice is good, but this sentence is completely daft! :D

 

I've had a few encounters with cows, generally since getting Safie, and usually they aren't much interested in me but keep a beady eye on her. On two occasions I've had to completely alter my route because there was no way I was opening the gate with a herd of aggressive, snorting cows with calves just the other side! Once I broke into a fast run as a small herd of young bullocks came racing across the field - mostly to see what was going on I think, but I wasn't going to wait and see if they would "stop before reaching me". The most recent instance was with some horses on a footpath, who again didn't mind me but were not at all keen on Safie.

 

Safie is very sensible and if we are attracting attention I let her off the lead. She generally runs away which is fine and the cows look/follow her and don't care about me at all. Luckily she doesn't have any interest in trying to protect me, which I think is great! Just run away - please! :)

 

Very bad news about the woman who died. :)

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I have to say if I know the area is open for cattle grazing I think twice before entering. And, on the whole, I would NOT take Jozie with me.

 

If I'm in any doubt whatsoever I prefer to not bother searching and will leave the cache for others to find. My life, and that of my dog, is more important than 'another number' :lol:

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I'm a farmers son so maybe I'm a little more used to the beasties..

Remember that most cattle (Especially in the North) have been indoors in sheds all winter and they tend to go a little bonkers when they have just been let out..

I have never been harmed by a bull, but always keep an eye on them especially the Limo breed.

Have however been completely wiped out by a cow that had recently been seperated from it's calf.. Be warned..

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No Jokes please
Good idea. Not such a good thread title...

 

Some excellent advice here, but it's worth saying people have been pushed off cliffs by sheep before now and the vast majority of cows will run up to you and stop about a cow-length from you. They're curious and dumb, and so long as you don't start to run, harmless. I'm saying don't be complacent, but don't be overly worried either; you're more likely to be killed by lightning than a cow.

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Apparently its against the law to say "Beware of the Bull" when there isn't a bull, too!

 

Is it OK to not say "Beware of the Bull" if there is one???? :lol:;)

 

They need to say if there is a bull, yes... easier to paint the creature with WARNING I AM A BULL on the side :)

I liked the sign that read, There may be a bull in this field 'caution'

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Are individual cows a problem or is it just if they've got their mates with them? Reason I ask is there's a common near us which is very popular with dog walkers who generally let the dogs run free, there are 3 or 4 cows let on to graze (therefore they won't be bulls and they don't have young) and they tend to wonder off individually rather than herd together.

 

When we're walking the mother-in-laws dog she (the dog not the M-I-L) will sometimes go over for a look but doesn't go too close so I've never really given them much thought - should I?

 

And yes there's a very good multi (already found :lol: ) there which requires roaming all over the common.

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Are individual cows a problem or is it just if they've got their mates with them? Reason I ask is there's a common near us which is very popular with dog walkers who generally let the dogs run free, there are 3 or 4 cows let on to graze (therefore they won't be bulls and they don't have young) and they tend to wonder off individually rather than herd together.

 

When we're walking the mother-in-laws dog she (the dog not the M-I-L) will sometimes go over for a look but doesn't go too close so I've never really given them much thought - should I?

 

And yes there's a very good multi (already found B) ) there which requires roaming all over the common.

Generally in my experience it is a bigger problem when they are in a herd, but not always the case. Last weekend we encountered a field with a herd on the far side of the field, but one of the herd decided to investigate us and became a problem, so much so that we decided to cross the adjoining field.

 

I am led to believe that the breed of cattle is of particular significance regarding such problems, and that dairy herds and worse than beef herds.

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I am led to believe that the breed of cattle is of particular significance regarding such problems, and that dairy herds and worse than beef herds.
cows.jpg

 

Don't know what breed these are or whether you eat 'em or milk 'em but you may well have to move them out of the way if you do my cache at Wimpole Hall. They roam free in the park and very often 'guard' the small bridge that gives access to the northern section of the park. I've never had a problem with them as they seem very tame and used to visitors but those horns do look just a tad on the pointy side B)

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I am led to believe that the breed of cattle is of particular significance regarding such problems, and that dairy herds and worse than beef herds.
cows.jpg

 

Don't know what breed these are or whether you eat 'em or milk 'em but you may well have to move them out of the way if you do my cache at Wimpole Hall. They roam free in the park and very often 'guard' the small bridge that gives access to the northern section of the park. I've never had a problem with them as they seem very tame and used to visitors but those horns do look just a tad on the pointy side B)

 

They're English Longhorn Cattle................and in ye olde times they used to eat them and milk them. There's a herd roaming (semi) free in Epping Forest.

 

When I first left school I wanted to be an RSPCA Inspector and worked on a farm for 18 months. Unless you have a dog with you, cows are more curious than aggressive. However.......I did get my knee cap dislocated by one, but that was more to do with me being complacent.

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Following on from this.

 

Every case of cow attackI have heard of or read about in the last 6 or 7 years has involved a person **** WITH A DOG****. From this surely the most sensible advice is, if at all possible leave the dog in the car if you know you are going to be crossing a field of cows

Yes it is good advise, in fact if at the start of a walk we see that we need to cross a field of cows (or horses) we will generally get back in the car and look for an alternative start point or just leave that cache for another day. Unfortunately if you are on a 10 mile circular walk it is unlikely that you will know. But by taking sensible precautions:

 

1) Check field before entering

2) If it contains cattle, try and find an alternative route, even if it means walking along the edge of adjoining field without a path. I'm sure that Mr Farmer would not mind, as it is preferable to his cattle becoming distressed or worse still having an incident on his hands.

3) If there is no alternative, check where the exit is and plan your route before entering. Walk away from the cattle keeping as much distance as possible from them.

4) Keep your dog under control and on a lead, unless the cattle come close and threatening then release the dog. It is the dog that the cattle are interested in and the dog is likely to be far more agile and faster than you are. If the dog is on his lead the cattle will come to him and you as you are attached via the lead. The dog is then likely to get injured as he cannot take evasive action, and as for you, well the OPs article said it all B) .

5) Do not hang about in the field, make your way promptly to the exit.

6) If the cache is in the cattle field, the forget it. If you really cannot forget it then get the dog into the next field, tie it to a tree/post and then go back for the cache.

 

The above is my opinion based on my experiences and may not work for all situations or be suitable for all dogs, but it has worked for me.

 

As somebody who was raised on a farm, and been in the countryside for most of his life, I entirely agree with the above 6 points.

Follow them and you wont go far wrong.

 

A lot of the potential problems are due to the way in which a cows eye works.

The optics are such that their long vision is comparatively poor while their close-up vision is very good.

(Think of it as cows being short sighted) :laughing:

 

They are also extremely curious when in a herd environment, and it only takes one or two individuals in the herd to decide to check you out before the whole lot come thundering over.

 

Basically, just stand your ground and the cow will come to a screeching halt a few feet in front of you.

All of their bravado just evaporates, along with the curiosity, and they stand there shuffling their hooves.

If you feel intimidated, then just wave your arms and loudly tell them to go away, it always works!

 

If you walk away from a group of cattle, they will often follow you at a few yards distance.

Basically just ignore them, or turn around and repeat the shooing treatment.

 

I have two working Border Collie sheep dogs, one of which is trained to work with cattle.

Just one look from the dog and the cows usually decide that they have more pressing business elsewhere. B)

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Most often, for most cattle, having young present or recently weaned will raise the aggresion factor a bit. Natural instinct, mom protects young and herds react together. Dogs and wolves look very much alike to a cow.

 

Without young, curiousity would be the norm. If cows are "in season" and a bull is present, he would be the major threat. In fact, enough threat I would not stick around. (Feets, don't fail me now!)

 

In our area, we have some that graze rodeo stock. These bulls have no fear of man, and can be aggresive without warning. However, our property laws don't allow the crossing of private holdings, go around.

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I will not go into a field with cows or horses. I have walked miles out of my way before take a chance crossing a field with live stock in. Bob will try to coax me in but all that does it make me lose my temper with him! We have had a couple of incidents with horses, one of them was purley because we had the dog with us. I had my walking pole with me and managed to stop the horse attacking the dog.........I swear it thought it was a bull the way it put its head down and charged at the dog! I was screaming at the horse like a flaming idiot and pointing the walking pole at it......Amazingly it stopped charging. Bob got the dog out of the field as I walked backwards towards the stile...keeping my pole aimed at the horse! I got to the stile but was shaking that much I could not lift my legs up to climb over it. Funny now looking back but it was certainly not funny at the time. I hate horses with vengance along with the other 4 legged bovines!

 

Lollers

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I hate horses with vengance along with the other 4 legged bovines!

You are not alone. I dislike and fear horses in equal extent. Cows I am just very wary of.

 

I recall walking across a field in Devon years ago with a friend, pushing our bikes loaded with touring gear (can't remember why), aware that there was a cow or two following us, but "like one who on a lonesome road doth walk in fear and dread, and having once turned back walks on, and no more turns his head" we hadn't really examined them. When we got to the exit from the field we turned saw we had been at the head of an enormous column of cattle, plodding along behind us.

Edited by Team Sieni
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oi leave horses alone lol. Generally a horse owner will not put their horse in a field with a right of way if they are unsure about it's temerament. The only time to be wary of a mare is when her foal is around, the foal being infinately curious, and the mare wanting you to get out out out of my field now! By nature, handled horses are always afraid to hurt people, and when they come charging over it's usually because they want to know if you've got any treats!!

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I recall walking across a field in Devon years ago with a friend, pushing our bikes loaded with touring gear (can't remember why), aware that there was a cow or two following us, but "like one who on a lonesome road doth walk in fear and dread, and having once turned back walks on, and no more turns his head" we hadn't really examined them. When we got to the exit from the field we turned saw we had been at the head of an enormous column of cattle, plodding along behind us.

 

We had a similar experience many years ago when our daughters aged about 8 & 11 were with us and just as we got to the other side of the field being followed by a herd of 100+ cows, our elder daughter asked,

"Daddy -- why has that one got a ring in its nose?"

 

I can testify (for that occasion at least) that a bull in a field with cows is OK.

Edited by Just Roger
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