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Was it my breath?


StarBrand

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People come and go from all kinds of hobbies... I've seen it happen in sailing, Ham radio, hiking, photography etc. I rotate between these hobbies and several more, that way I don't get too obsessive about any of them. I've noticed that after a while it seems like any group, hobby or otherwise, becomes politicized and people want to start pulling rank or thinking their ideas are better than everyone else's. This really turns people off. A little humility please! Also a lot of people now days have a real entitlement mentality "here I am, entertain me!" When that doesn't happen they get bored and move on. I don't get bored because I like hiking for the sake of hiking alone and finding a cache is just icing on the cake.

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Hi,

I guess I qualify as a noob, made 2 finds earlier today, for a total of 24 finds. I carefully read all the previous posts, and have nodded in agreement several times, and shook my head at others.

 

I've had a portable GPSr for years, as a backup on my boat (other hobby). I was sitting in my computer room(other hobby) trying to think of something to do, because football season was over(other hobby) and it's not yet golf season(other hobby), and it's too cold to go for a ride with the top down (yet another hobby). Yep, I could have turned on my ham radio(yes, I do that too), but I was really trying to think of something to get me outdoors and hiking. I did some googling and found this site. Purchased a premium membership and found 3 caches on my first day (for the record, since others did the same 1=reg size, between rocks at a park, 2=reg size near a playground, 3=micro in guardrail).

 

My main complaints with this newest hobby, and by proxy, this web site of our community :

  • Web site user interface - let's face it, it's dated. With advances that we are accustomed to on facebook, myspace, google widgets, the interface here is not quite up to par.
  • pocket queries - truly archaic. The data format, the limitations, with some minor tweaking, the UI could be bearable. e.g. Use radio buttons for either/or parameters.
  • demands for quality written logs of how wonderful the cache search was. As hard as it may seem to believe, I don't really enjoy typing long messages about caches I find.
  • so far, its a very solo activity, I have managed to meet a few people at the local REI. There is a social event in a few months, I'm looking forward to that.

So that is my $.02 worth.

 

It is a fun hobby and game!!!

 

PS. I would be glad to discuss any of the web/UI thoughts, drop me an email.

PPS. If you think it's your breath, it probably is :anibad:

 

 

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I'll through our 2 cents in: My wife read an article about geoacaching before christmas, thought it sounded neat and wanted to try it: christmas gift #1 solved.

 

I buy her a cheap GPS nowing that if we don't like it, we hadn't put that much into it.

 

Well its not quite 3 months later and we upgraded to a much nicer Garmin, a bunch of software for the computer and phones a $600 "beater" jeep for the forest and have about 250 finds under our belt.

 

So are we "noobs" that will fizzle out? Probably not. Our other hobbies are mountain biking, hiking, camping and paintball, all of which we have dumped some serious change in to BUT still do. We have a pretty good idea of whether we'll like a hobby and stick to it. Will we slow down? Probably. Thats usually the nature of any hobby you get in to.

 

What we like about the hobby:

- First and foremost its the "We". I get to go trapsing around the woods, park, street, etc and spend quality time with my wife and family.

- Secondly, whether it be in our beater cherokee or hiking to a cache, getting there is just as mutch fun. Finding new areas and learning new things is great.

- Friends. The local geocachers org is outstanding, filled with a ton of down to earth people thats we've enjoyed meeting, usually at the bar next to the state forest that most of us cache in on a weekly basis.

-The type of cache and location of the cache really doesn't bother us. There is some psychology to geocaching if you think about it. After a while, you get the "feel" of how a specific cacher hides stuff. Its fun to size up the cache even before looking at the GPS to figure where they may have hid it and why they hid it there.

 

Our caches:

- We have 2 caches.

- Our first is in a lampskirt at a movie theater. Lame? Depends on your point of view. My eight year old loves geocaching with us and wanted to hide a cache. She came up with the cache stype, name and localtion. We helped her place it and write up the description. Whats the difference from my daughter wanting to hide a cache or play soccer? We would have preferred to wait and hide our cache but didn't want to curb her enthusiasm. On top of that, she is a pro at finding these types of caches which makes it all that much more enjoyable when we're out caching.

- Our 2nd is out in the local state forest and was well thought out and placed. Thus far, A bunch of the local "old heads" have found it and enjoyed it's cleverness.

- Our rule: we won"t hide any more than 1 cache per 100 we find. We figured this would help keep us in check and ensure we were creating fun, new caches.

 

...our 2 cents...

-galaP-

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It is almost March and already a few of the new area Christmas cachers have put thier GPS units out on the Garage Shelf never to be used for Geocaching again.

 

Anybody know why so many get excited about it and then fade away? Any great ideas for keeping folks energized about caching? Especially in a semi-rural area. With 110 active hides, I am nearing the limits of caches I can logistically maintain.

 

I've been doing this for over 6 years now and still feel that rush when I find a cache or spot a new location for one. It is hard for me to understand why 80% or more of cachers that have started up around here have stopped caching after no more than a year or so.

 

The names and faces at our local events just keep changing.

 

Being a "newbie" to the world of geocaching I think it really depends on the original reason why a person was first attracted to geocaching in the first place. In my opinion, if they get into it because they enjoy hiking then maybe they are more likely to stay interested. However - again in my opinion - if they get into it because of the "technology" then perhaps they are more likely to "burn out"?

 

BTW, I used to always go hiking through the woods and hid little treasures for my son to find on our way back. Needless to say, I'm totally hooked on geocaching. I can't believe I didn't find out about this sooner.

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It is almost March and already a few of the new area Christmas cachers have put thier GPS units out on the Garage Shelf never to be used for Geocaching again.

 

Anybody know why so many get excited about it and then fade away? Any great ideas for keeping folks energized about caching? Especially in a semi-rural area. With 110 active hides, I am nearing the limits of caches I can logistically maintain.

 

I've been doing this for over 6 years now and still feel that rush when I find a cache or spot a new location for one. It is hard for me to understand why 80% or more of cachers that have started up around here have stopped caching after no more than a year or so.

 

The names and faces at our local events just keep changing.

 

Being a "newbie" to the world of geocaching I think it really depends on the original reason why a person was first attracted to geocaching in the first place. In my opinion, if they get into it because they enjoy hiking then maybe they are more likely to stay interested. However - again in my opinion - if they get into it because of the "technology" then perhaps they are more likely to "burn out"?

 

BTW, I used to always go hiking through the woods and hid little treasures for my son to find on our way back. Needless to say, I'm totally hooked on geocaching. I can't believe I didn't find out about this sooner.

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I like micros in city settings and hiking for larger finds. It doesn't matter to me. It depends on my schedule and goal of the day. I'm happy to find all of them. I also like the feeling of knowing a cache is where people pass by it constantly and not know it's there.

 

If people don't like micros in the city, then don't find them. Simple as that. I will continue to find and hide them.

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Not your breath (I have never smelled it though, so I cannot be sure)

 

Why go traipsing off in the parks, woods, lamp posts (I have yet to find one of those) when you can sit on your fat bum and play with the latest techy toy in the comforts of your home and not have to chance interacting with other life forms?

 

Is that too sarcastic?

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We are newbies timewise (just coming up to our 4 month aniversary).

 

It seems likely that we will stick with geocaching because:

it combines the outdoors (already did alot of walking - kind of have to with dogs (and living in New Zealand the outdoors is the place to be!!!)),

photography (I do scrapbooking -- so now I just have more than ever photos to scrapbook!!)

techo stuff (helps having a husband who likes 'toys'!)

time on the computer (I bet my scrapbooking forums and groups have missed me the last few months LOL)

history (we live in an area with lots of historical places and very cool old cemetaries!!)

puzzles (already did suduko and crosswords)

 

Plus it's just a fun activity to do together!!! (And PB has developed quite a nack with devious camo hides!)

 

And - our first finds were a small cache on a short forest track (by accident and what got us started), a small at an historic spot, a small at a scenic riverside spot, and a small on another bush walk.

 

Nanos I can live with - they're a good challenge usually .... but those darn micro film canisters, I'm not so keen on, but they won't put us off and we do them if we're passing by.

 

Annie

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Why do the names and faces at local events keep changing?

 

Events aren't for everyone. Personally, I hate people. I hate parties. I hate small talk. A year or so ago I forced myself to attend a couple GX events, thinking I might find a local buddy to GX with (S.O. is the "indoorsy" type). I discovered for the first time in my life that I might not hate people afterall. I DO like meeting GXers at events and in the wild; I haven't met a bad one yet. A couple cranky ones maybe, but no evil ones. They are the only social group I enjoy associating with. Now I feel deprived if I can't make a local event. I make a weekend caching/camping trip out of GX events not-so-close to home.

 

I hate competition and rushing in any form. A good number of events are based on turning GXing into a competition. This cannot be encouraging for Newbies. Hey you, with 24 finds, come compete against Team Juggs with 10,424 finds :) I just don't "get" the Poker Runs and FTF prizes. Why would I want to rush my trek through the woods??? The last two events I went to (non-competetive, TG) were in popular parks full of muggles on the weekend. I had to stand in line to sign the logs of several caches :) Great for Newbies, I guess, but jaded me felt robbed of my solitude.

 

GXing is appealing due to many aspects: hiking, biking, kayaking, photography, birdwatching, history, dogwalking, techie stuff and travel. If you love these aspects, you will continue GXing despite getting lost, skeeters, spiders, ticks, blisters, dehydration, sunburn, heat, cold, rain, mud, DNFs and disappointing caches. And speaking of urban micros, I love doin'em at night. A nap at 7pm; 3am Cracker Barrel, I am there, crawling under the washin' machine. No muggles, no traffic, and the temp is much more bearable in Florida in August. It does bug me, though, when a micro is placed ten yards away from a nice deep forest :lol: or when a micro is hidden where you could hide a Volkswagen. Placing a micro just requires very little thought.

 

And speaking of Newbie hides, I inherited a Newbie down the street who hid 10 carpy caches (and one okay cache) in my area before he even had any finds!!! I still haven't found a couple of them; I found out at an event that he has "buried a them a foot deep". If he drops out it will be from all the negative comments he's going to receive on his carpy caches. Not my day to watch him. I didn't hide any until I had over 300 finds, and I'm still embarrassed about my "Dive & Dine" micros.

 

Another reason people drop out is that they've found all the caches within 20 miles of home and work. Unless they move, they need to have the time and money to travel in order to keep playing.

 

Cache on,

tallglenn :)

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As is common with lots of hobbies that require more than just a casual interest to get started (fishkeeping and gardening come to mind at the moment) many people decided to go right out and do it before properly researching what will be required of them.

 

I don't know how many times I've read people posting on a fishkeeping board that they decided they want a 12" oscar fish so they went out and bought a 20 gallon tank and a fish last weekend and he died so they took him back and the guy said the water was fine so they bought another one but now he's dead too and they don't know why. When they find out that *gasp* the 16 year old guy at PetSmart didn't know what he was talking about and that they need at least a 50 gallon tank and a month to set it up before a 12" fish can live in it most of them get all upset and give up all together.

 

I think Geocaching fits into the "requires research or a knowledgable friend before jumping in" category. I've been reading these board and looking at cache pages for about two weeks now and I've yet to find my first. Now that I've done the research and read others' experiences I feel I'll have a better experience than my friend Brenda who has tried finding caches three times with no luck and gave up.

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Not your breath (I have never smelled it though, so I cannot be sure)

 

Why go traipsing off in the parks, woods, lamp posts (I have yet to find one of those) when you can sit on your fat bum and play with the latest techy toy in the comforts of your home and not have to chance interacting with other life forms?

 

Is that too sarcastic?

 

Nope, not too sarcastic, simply realistic. What's cool though, is that geocaching actually saved me from a computer gaming addiction. :lol:

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I have slowed down some in recent years - but I am not a one sport person, I do caching on short notice if nothing else is going on. I spend way to much time on the Internet find a suitable cache. Too many quick grabs and 1/1 shorty - I want a hike and a great place. I find I pass on a lot more caches now that so many are pointless in location. I spend time looking at the logs for approval. I guess sorting by difficulty would be nice. Pointless trade items hurt the sport alot and I wish people would do better on that.

Edited by GPS-Hermit
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Same goes for all us parents out there who's kids grow up and move out and when you start cleaning up you find tucked away in the closets all that tennis stuff, the boogy board and wet suit, the skate board, the hula hoop, the baton, the paintball stuff, the roller blades, the hockey stick, the stored aquarium, the volley ball, the badmitton net, and all the stuff they went thru before they latched on to soccer or softball or whatever they ended up sticking with (if anything at all). Not something you grow out of, try it before you buy it mentality. All of them sound good until the law of diminishing returns kicks in... more work then fun and they're done.

 

For me GC gave me an outlet for running around like crazy having fun, being creative and sneaky, visiting all kinds of urban and rural spots, riding a bike and doing all kinds of things that many empty-nesters stop doing when they find themselves in an empty nest. So for me it's an addiction but a fun one and one that if I don't get around to for a couple weeks will still be there when I'm ready.

 

There are some who don't want GC to grow too much, the secret society feeling is kind of fun, too :)

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I'm a X-mass cacher. We went camping with some friends who took us caching in the fall. The whole family had a great time. The wife got me a very simple gps for X-mass. So far I have 80 finds. I think geo-caching is great!! My wife and kids are slowing. athou they go from time to time the rush is over. :D

 

I think its the not knowing how hard is it going to be to find the cache or whats in the cache that has alot to do with it. Funny thing is I like the unknown. :)

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I've been doing this for over 6 years now and still feel that rush when I find a cache or spot a new location for one. It is hard for me to understand why 80% or more of cachers that have started up around here have stopped caching after no more than a year or so.

 

Same reason people start and stop:

 

Jogging, cycling, reading the Bible, tap lessons, music lessons...basically name any hobby!!

 

For some people, some things are fun because they are new. When they stop being new, they're not fun anymore. On to the next new thing. Other people, for what ever reason, find certain things entertaining....even if they do it over, and over, and over, and over, and over......

 

It's just human nature.

I would have to agree here. If you looked on that garage shelf you would probably also find a guitar, tennis racket, fishing pole just to name a few. :)

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This is just a guess but, I know when I see a bug or a coin is available and then when I go and find the cache the coin/bug isn't there. I find it super annoying to not have someone log it as taken. I am very new to this and already I get bummed by the lazy people out there that won't log stuff.

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I have seen what happens to a guy when he is new to the game and makes a mistake, then makes a second, even bigger mistake by posting a thread about it. The purpose of the post may have been nothing more than, "Ah bummer", possibly just to get it off their chest, and it gets blown totally out of proportion. The poster then becomes public enemy #1 for the duration of the thread like it is a sport.

 

There seems to be no shortage of people who will post a link to a rules page for the offender and say that he/she is pouting or something of that nature. Then others will jump in and 2nd, 3rd, and 4th what was said previously, possibly sending a duplicate link. They may not have even read the entire thread and feel like they are posting something new.

 

The originator of this thread wanted to know why people leave. I am simply offering a possible explanation for some of the losses. Most people who do this type of hobby are intelligent, often very successful, people who can take criticism and correction. What they won't put up with is chastisement. Its not worth it when the payoff for continuing to play the game may be finding a lame film canister under a light pole skirt.

 

I happen to like this game. So far the people who I have met in person or have contacted me by email have been really nice. If you are a new to the forum, my advice is to not post for the first year. Look around and find out what flies and what doesn't before you post. It may surprise you. Just remember, text doesn't always convey intention and emotion the way you intend it to.

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