Jump to content

Attaching to concrete


linuxxpert
Followers 2

Recommended Posts

I was driving around today looking for caches that were recently placed in my area, and I spotted a new little bridge being build. The bridge is made all out of smooth concrete and when you are underneath its more like a storm drain than a bridge. This thing is screaming for a easy to find micro :huh:. However there are no crevices to hide a container in. So here is my question, how would you attach a bison tube (or similar) to smooth concrete without defacing property?

 

Note: Please do not make this post about not liking micros, etc. I am just asking for some advise, thank you!

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

Edited by Difranco
Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

 

Yeah.... :huh: I dont think its a good idea to be drilling holes in a bridge. It will never get approved by the reviewer and may land you in jail or get you a HUGE fine.

 

I hope you are joking... are you? :lol:

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

 

You jest, I assume? :huh::huh::lol:

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

 

He's just joking....I think.

Link to comment

I think I have an idea.

At work we use those metal clips for blueprints, link:

 

http://www.staples.com/webapp/wcs/stores/s...p;cmArea=SEARCH

 

What if I get rid of those handles and use some pliers to "bend" the flanges the opposite way, squeeze it in an expansion joint and then attach a magnetic bison tube to it? I can buy a few different sizes and see which fits best.

Edited by linuxxpert
Link to comment

Or... put a piece of PVC pipe into the ground right near it, and cap it off. Then you are not doing anything to the structure itself and you should stay out of trouble. You could make a stopper inside so cache container doesnt slide all the way down (nail/screw from outside, fill with foam. wood dowel, etc...)

 

There has to be some soil near enough to hammer a short length of PVC into, Leave it stick up a foot or so...that way it isnt considered "buried" ??

 

JMO I just like MacGuyvering stuff

Edited by KidRipley
Link to comment

From the guidelines on how not to place a cache

 

Caches near, on or under public structures deemed potential or possible targets for terrorist attacks. These may include but are not limited to highway bridges, dams, government buildings, elementary and secondary schools, and airports

 

I just have to build a fire when have the chance

 

:huh:

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

Speaking here as a scientist and as an ex-engineer, I would like to heartily state that the above recommendation is woefully under-powered, that is, it does not go far enough. Rather, I would suggest the following steps, in order to create a REALLY high-quality cache hide:

  • using a roto-hammer tool (you can rent them from Home Depot by the hour or by the day), drill one hundred pilot holes of 1/4" diameter to a depth of 8 inches in the concrete. Space the 100 holes in an even grid with each hole three inches apart in both a vertical direction and a horizontal direction from its neighbor.
  • after the one hundred 1/4" diameter pilot holes have been drilled, use a larger bit to enlarge each hole to diameter of one inch and a depth of 8 inches.
  • using a bucket of freshly-mixed Quick-concrete, mount one each of the largest size Bison tube available (about 3/4" diameter) in each hole to a depth of four inches and then seal the hole completely with the concrete.
  • in 99 of the Bison tubes, you will enclose simply a brief note reading "DECOY -- THIS IS NOT THE CACHE! KEEP LOOKING!"
  • in only one of the Bison tubes, you will install the scroll logbook and a small pencil.
  • list the cache as a Difficulty 5 cache, and as Terrain 5, and state explicitly on the cache listing page that this is a 5/5 cache, and that finders will need to bring a gasoline engine-driven air compressor and an air-driven jackhammer with three spare chisel bits in order to find and extract each of the 100 containers in order to find the real cache container, and that they will also need to bring a bag of concrete and a bucket of water for use in mixing the concrete (which will be used to replace the tubes and to fill all the holes after doing so) along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete..
  • In case you are wondering, the cache deserves the Terrain 5 rating because of the special equipment required to be used by each finder, namely, the gasoline engine-driven air compressor, the jackhammer and chisel bits, the bag of concrete and the bucket of water, along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete.

Presto! You now have a world-class 5/5 cache, and you will be able to brag about it during mealtimes at the state pen while serving your 15 year felony conviction for destroying municipal infrastructure! :lol::huh::(:D:D:huh:

 

:huh:

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

 

Those caps UNSCREW??? I can't start to count how many of these type caches I've chiseled out of bridges...

Link to comment

I think I have an idea.

At work we use those metal clips for blueprints, link:

 

http://www.staples.com/webapp/wcs/stores/s...p;cmArea=SEARCH

 

What if I get rid of those handles and use some pliers to "bend" the flanges the opposite way, squeeze it in an expansion joint and then attach a magnetic bison tube to it? I can buy a few different sizes and see which fits best.

 

A climbing cam might also work in the expansion joint, but they are expensive. Perhaps if you have a friend who is a climber you can bum an old one off of him.

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

Speaking here as a scientist and as an ex-engineer, I would like to heartily state that the above recommendation is woefully under-powered, that is, it does not go far enough. Rather, I would suggest the following steps, in order to create a REALLY high-quality cache hide:

  • using a roto-hammer tool (you can rent them from Home Depot by the hour or by the day), drill one hundred pilot holes of 1/4" diameter to a depth of 8 inches in the concrete. Space the 100 holes in an even grid with each hole three inches apart in both a vertical direction and a horizontal direction from its neighbor.
  • after the one hundred 1/4" diameter pilot holes have been drilled, use a larger bit to enlarge each hole to diameter of one inch and a depth of 8 inches.
  • using a bucket of freshly-mixed Quick-concrete, mount one each of the largest size Bison tube available (about 3/4" diameter) in each hole to a depth of four inches and then seal the hole completely with the concrete.
  • in 99 of the Bison tubes, you will enclose simply a brief note reading "DECOY -- THIS IS NOT THE CACHE! KEEP LOOKING!"
  • in only one of the Bison tubes, you will install the scroll logbook and a small pencil.
  • list the cache as a Difficulty 5 cache, and as Terrain 5, and state explicitly on the cache listing page that this is a 5/5 cache, and that finders will need to bring a gasoline engine-driven air compressor and an air-driven jackhammer with three spare chisel bits in order to find and extract each of the 100 containers in order to find the real cache container, and that they will also need to bring a bag of concrete and a bucket of water for use in mixing the concrete (which will be used to replace the tubes and to fill all the holes after doing so) along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete..
  • In case you are wondering, the cache deserves the Terrain 5 rating because of the special equipment required to be used by each finder, namely, the gasoline engine-driven air compressor, the jackhammer and chisel bits, the bag of concrete and the bucket of water, along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete.

Presto! You now have a world-class 5/5 cache, and you will be able to brag about it during mealtimes at the state pen while serving your 15 year felony conviction for destroying municipal infrastructure! :lol::(:D:D:huh::huh:

 

:huh:

 

Great idea! I actually own a hammer-drill, its about 9:30 PM here, so I can swing by the Home-Depot for some concrete before it closes (They close at 10 around here). I should be able to make it to GZ at 10:30 and I can start hammer-drilling away. Its an electric drill so I will just have to bring my generator too. I am sure I can do this stealthy. :D

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

Speaking here as a scientist and as an ex-engineer, I would like to heartily state that the above recommendation is woefully under-powered, that is, it does not go far enough. Rather, I would suggest the following steps, in order to create a REALLY high-quality cache hide:

  • using a roto-hammer tool (you can rent them from Home Depot by the hour or by the day), drill one hundred pilot holes of 1/4" diameter to a depth of 8 inches in the concrete. Space the 100 holes in an even grid with each hole three inches apart in both a vertical direction and a horizontal direction from its neighbor.
  • after the one hundred 1/4" diameter pilot holes have been drilled, use a larger bit to enlarge each hole to diameter of one inch and a depth of 8 inches.
  • using a bucket of freshly-mixed Quick-concrete, mount one each of the largest size Bison tube available (about 3/4" diameter) in each hole to a depth of four inches and then seal the hole completely with the concrete.
  • in 99 of the Bison tubes, you will enclose simply a brief note reading "DECOY -- THIS IS NOT THE CACHE! KEEP LOOKING!"
  • in only one of the Bison tubes, you will install the scroll logbook and a small pencil.
  • list the cache as a Difficulty 5 cache, and as Terrain 5, and state explicitly on the cache listing page that this is a 5/5 cache, and that finders will need to bring a gasoline engine-driven air compressor and an air-driven jackhammer with three spare chisel bits in order to find and extract each of the 100 containers in order to find the real cache container, and that they will also need to bring a bag of concrete and a bucket of water for use in mixing the concrete (which will be used to replace the tubes and to fill all the holes after doing so) along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete..
  • In case you are wondering, the cache deserves the Terrain 5 rating because of the special equipment required to be used by each finder, namely, the gasoline engine-driven air compressor, the jackhammer and chisel bits, the bag of concrete and the bucket of water, along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete.

Presto! You now have a world-class 5/5 cache, and you will be able to brag about it during mealtimes at the state pen while serving your 15 year felony conviction for destroying municipal infrastructure! :(:D:D:D:huh::huh:

 

:D

 

Great idea! I actually own a hammer-drill, its about 9:30 PM here, so I can swing by the Home-Depot for some concrete before it closes (They close at 10 around here). I should be able to make it to GZ at 10:30 and I can start hammer-drilling away. Its an electric drill so I will just have to bring my generator too. I am sure I can do this stealthy. :huh:

 

Rent some of those big light towers so you can see make sure you wear a hardhat, the muggles won't give you a second glance. :lol:

Link to comment

From the guidelines on how not to place a cache

 

Caches near, on or under public structures deemed potential or possible targets for terrorist attacks. These may include but are not limited to highway bridges, dams, government buildings, elementary and secondary schools, and airports

 

I just have to build a fire when have the chance

 

:huh:

 

Depends on what sort of bridge. The spirit of the guideline is "structures deemed potential or possible targets for terrorist attacks". A nice little footbridge across a pastoral stream would hardly be considered a terrorist target.

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

Speaking here as a scientist and as an ex-engineer, I would like to heartily state that the above recommendation is woefully under-powered, that is, it does not go far enough. Rather, I would suggest the following steps, in order to create a REALLY high-quality cache hide:

  • using a roto-hammer tool (you can rent them from Home Depot by the hour or by the day), drill one hundred pilot holes of 1/4" diameter to a depth of 8 inches in the concrete. Space the 100 holes in an even grid with each hole three inches apart in both a vertical direction and a horizontal direction from its neighbor.
  • after the one hundred 1/4" diameter pilot holes have been drilled, use a larger bit to enlarge each hole to diameter of one inch and a depth of 8 inches.
  • using a bucket of freshly-mixed Quick-concrete, mount one each of the largest size Bison tube available (about 3/4" diameter) in each hole to a depth of four inches and then seal the hole completely with the concrete.
  • in 99 of the Bison tubes, you will enclose simply a brief note reading "DECOY -- THIS IS NOT THE CACHE! KEEP LOOKING!"
  • in only one of the Bison tubes, you will install the scroll logbook and a small pencil.
  • list the cache as a Difficulty 5 cache, and as Terrain 5, and state explicitly on the cache listing page that this is a 5/5 cache, and that finders will need to bring a gasoline engine-driven air compressor and an air-driven jackhammer with three spare chisel bits in order to find and extract each of the 100 containers in order to find the real cache container, and that they will also need to bring a bag of concrete and a bucket of water for use in mixing the concrete (which will be used to replace the tubes and to fill all the holes after doing so) along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete..
  • In case you are wondering, the cache deserves the Terrain 5 rating because of the special equipment required to be used by each finder, namely, the gasoline engine-driven air compressor, the jackhammer and chisel bits, the bag of concrete and the bucket of water, along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete.

Presto! You now have a world-class 5/5 cache, and you will be able to brag about it during mealtimes at the state pen while serving your 15 year felony conviction for destroying municipal infrastructure! :huh::huh::(:huh::lol::D

 

:D

 

Vinnie... let me get this straight. You are actually suggesting that the ends of the bison tubes remain exposed? What fun is that? Or did I misunderstand.

Link to comment

So here is my question, how would you attach a bison tube (or similar) to smooth concrete without defacing property?

 

I've seen items attached to concrete with a type of mastic/adhesive that was grey in color, went on with a small putty knife and dried to a hard substance. But, I can't remember the name of it. The tube could be attached with a small dab of that. No structural damage from that, just cosmetic. I'll try some research to see if I can find the name of it.

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

Speaking here as a scientist and as an ex-engineer, I would like to heartily state that the above recommendation is woefully under-powered, that is, it does not go far enough. Rather, I would suggest the following steps, in order to create a REALLY high-quality cache hide:

  • using a roto-hammer tool (you can rent them from Home Depot by the hour or by the day), drill one hundred pilot holes of 1/4" diameter to a depth of 8 inches in the concrete. Space the 100 holes in an even grid with each hole three inches apart in both a vertical direction and a horizontal direction from its neighbor.
  • after the one hundred 1/4" diameter pilot holes have been drilled, use a larger bit to enlarge each hole to diameter of one inch and a depth of 8 inches.
  • using a bucket of freshly-mixed Quick-concrete, mount one each of the largest size Bison tube available (about 3/4" diameter) in each hole to a depth of four inches and then seal the hole completely with the concrete.
  • in 99 of the Bison tubes, you will enclose simply a brief note reading "DECOY -- THIS IS NOT THE CACHE! KEEP LOOKING!"
  • in only one of the Bison tubes, you will install the scroll logbook and a small pencil.
  • list the cache as a Difficulty 5 cache, and as Terrain 5, and state explicitly on the cache listing page that this is a 5/5 cache, and that finders will need to bring a gasoline engine-driven air compressor and an air-driven jackhammer with three spare chisel bits in order to find and extract each of the 100 containers in order to find the real cache container, and that they will also need to bring a bag of concrete and a bucket of water for use in mixing the concrete (which will be used to replace the tubes and to fill all the holes after doing so) along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete..
  • In case you are wondering, the cache deserves the Terrain 5 rating because of the special equipment required to be used by each finder, namely, the gasoline engine-driven air compressor, the jackhammer and chisel bits, the bag of concrete and the bucket of water, along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete.

Presto! You now have a world-class 5/5 cache, and you will be able to brag about it during mealtimes at the state pen while serving your 15 year felony conviction for destroying municipal infrastructure! :(:D:D:D:huh::huh:

 

:D

 

Great idea! I actually own a hammer-drill, its about 9:30 PM here, so I can swing by the Home-Depot for some concrete before it closes (They close at 10 around here). I should be able to make it to GZ at 10:30 and I can start hammer-drilling away. Its an electric drill so I will just have to bring my generator too. I am sure I can do this stealthy. :huh:

 

 

Home Depot sells cordless hammer-drills too. Don't pass up a chance to justify getting a new cordless toy. :lol: I used my safety bonus gift card to get about $300 of cordless toys last year. B)

 

It would also be easier to be stealthy that way too.

Link to comment

I checked Lowes.com and found the following two items that would work just fine. The quart size was $6 and change and the other was less than $2. The good thing is they were both ready to use and in squeeze bottles/tubes with a cap on the end. I'm not pushing Lowes here. You can probably get the same items at any home supply store. Either would stick a tube to concrete

 

They are:

 

Quikrete® Quart Concrete Crack Seal

Item #: 10431 Model: 14443

Fills cracks op to 1/2" wide Ready to use convenience Seals out water and weather Easy to clean up hot water Blends in with natural color of concrete

 

Quikrete® 5.5 oz. Concrete Repair Squeeze Tube

Item #: 104402 Model: 8620-13

Textured formula blends with color of concrete surface

Link to comment

So here is my question, how would you attach a bison tube (or similar) to smooth concrete without defacing property?

 

I've seen items attached to concrete with a type of mastic/adhesive that was grey in color, went on with a small putty knife and dried to a hard substance. But, I can't remember the name of it. The tube could be attached with a small dab of that. No structural damage from that, just cosmetic. I'll try some research to see if I can find the name of it.

 

That may not fly.....

 

My approver disallowed a fence post cap micro because I had used Liquid Nails to attach the micro inside the cap. Mind you, when the cap was in place, you could not see the micro or the Liquid Nails. I needed to remove the Liquid Nails with mineral spirits and attach the thing with a rare earth magnet in order to get approval. I can imagine how many 25mm cans will be stacked up inside the post by this time next year! Your mileage may vary.

 

I've seen several micros around here attached with velcro. One pulls the velcro loop part which is attached to the micro leaving the velcro hook part on the post/bench/fence/whatever. (not approved by the same approver)

 

Bison tubes are stainless and are non-magnetic. Magnets won't work.

 

I'm sure that you can find something nearby on which to hang the bison. One local here loves to hang camoed bisons in trees with black Eagle Claw fishing leaders..... :huh:

Link to comment

I checked Lowes.com and found the following two items that would work just fine. The quart size was $6 and change and the other was less than $2. The good thing is they were both ready to use and in squeeze bottles/tubes with a cap on the end. I'm not pushing Lowes here. You can probably get the same items at any home supply store. Either would stick a tube to concrete

 

They are:

 

Quikrete® Quart Concrete Crack Seal

Item #: 10431 Model: 14443

Fills cracks op to 1/2" wide Ready to use convenience Seals out water and weather Easy to clean up hot water Blends in with natural color of concrete

 

Quikrete® 5.5 oz. Concrete Repair Squeeze Tube

Item #: 104402 Model: 8620-13

Textured formula blends with color of concrete surface

 

While I do appreciate the help, wouldn't using this deface the structure permanently? Or am I just too picky? I read somewhere in the forum that someone couldn't get a cache approved because he used liquid nails on the inside of a fence post cap. :huh:

Link to comment

Or... put a piece of PVC pipe into the ground right near it, and cap it off. Then you are not doing anything to the structure itself and you should stay out of trouble. You could make a stopper inside so cache container doesnt slide all the way down (nail/screw from outside, fill with foam. wood dowel, etc...)

 

There has to be some soil near enough to hammer a short length of PVC into, Leave it stick up a foot or so...that way it isnt considered "buried" ??

 

JMO I just like MacGuyvering stuff

Without going too far off the original topic....

Read the guidelines, Kid. If you need to dig a hole to find it or to hide it that's not allowed.

Link to comment

Take another read of his post. He walks all the way up to the guideline, but his method does not violate it.

It violates the spirit and the intent. I have to say, if that method of hide were to show up in a park I managed, we would go to full permission required. I suspect if I wasn't also a cacher I would probably ban caches outright based on a buried cache and it wouldnt matter to me the land manager if you used a shovel or a hammer.

Link to comment

Take another read of his post. He walks all the way up to the guideline, but his method does not violate it.

It violates the spirit and the intent. I have to say, if that method of hide were to show up in a park I managed, we would go to full permission required. I suspect if I wasn't also a cacher I would probably ban caches outright based on a buried cache and it wouldnt matter to me the land manager if you used a shovel or a hammer.

 

I fully agree and while I do appreciate the help it also does not help answer the original question.

Link to comment

So here is my question, how would you attach a bison tube (or similar) to smooth concrete without defacing property?

 

I've seen items attached to concrete with a type of mastic/adhesive that was grey in color, went on with a small putty knife and dried to a hard substance. But, I can't remember the name of it. The tube could be attached with a small dab of that. No structural damage from that, just cosmetic. I'll try some research to see if I can find the name of it.

 

Just so long as it is only cosmetic damage.

Link to comment

If you glue anything to the concrete, you will need to clean it first. Likely it has bond breaker still on the surface from the forms when it was poured. Even if it doesn't it will likely have some loose minerals that leached to the surface, making it chalky and hard to adhere to. You can clean it with vinegar, which is a weak acid. It won't hurt the bridge at all, but will clean off any contaminates and allow the glue to stick. Even better is muratic acid (like you get at the pool supply). It will etch slightly into the surface, making it slightly rougher and giving the adhesive something to "bite" into. If you use muratic acid, only apply it right on the spot you want the glue and be sure to rinse after it with water.

Edited by Snakelover
Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

Speaking here as a scientist and as an ex-engineer, I would like to heartily state that the above recommendation is woefully under-powered, that is, it does not go far enough. Rather, I would suggest the following steps, in order to create a REALLY high-quality cache hide:

  • using a roto-hammer tool (you can rent them from Home Depot by the hour or by the day), drill one hundred pilot holes of 1/4" diameter to a depth of 8 inches in the concrete. Space the 100 holes in an even grid with each hole three inches apart in both a vertical direction and a horizontal direction from its neighbor.
  • after the one hundred 1/4" diameter pilot holes have been drilled, use a larger bit to enlarge each hole to diameter of one inch and a depth of 8 inches.
  • using a bucket of freshly-mixed Quick-concrete, mount one each of the largest size Bison tube available (about 3/4" diameter) in each hole to a depth of four inches and then seal the hole completely with the concrete.
  • in 99 of the Bison tubes, you will enclose simply a brief note reading "DECOY -- THIS IS NOT THE CACHE! KEEP LOOKING!"
  • in only one of the Bison tubes, you will install the scroll logbook and a small pencil.
  • list the cache as a Difficulty 5 cache, and as Terrain 5, and state explicitly on the cache listing page that this is a 5/5 cache, and that finders will need to bring a gasoline engine-driven air compressor and an air-driven jackhammer with three spare chisel bits in order to find and extract each of the 100 containers in order to find the real cache container, and that they will also need to bring a bag of concrete and a bucket of water for use in mixing the concrete (which will be used to replace the tubes and to fill all the holes after doing so) along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete..
  • In case you are wondering, the cache deserves the Terrain 5 rating because of the special equipment required to be used by each finder, namely, the gasoline engine-driven air compressor, the jackhammer and chisel bits, the bag of concrete and the bucket of water, along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete.

Presto! You now have a world-class 5/5 cache, and you will be able to brag about it during mealtimes at the state pen while serving your 15 year felony conviction for destroying municipal infrastructure! :D:D:D:cool::blink::D

 

:blink:

Vinnie... let me get this straight. You are actually suggesting that the ends of the bison tubes remain exposed? What fun is that? Or did I misunderstand.

No, and sorry for any confusion! What I was trying to say in my instructions was that each bison tube should be inserted fully into the hole, to a depth of a few inches, so that it is completely hidden and obscured by the filler concrete. In other words, the outermost end of the tube should be at least two to three inches into the hole, and the space then backfilled with concrete to obscure any view of the tube.

Edited by Vinny & Sue Team
Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

Speaking here as a scientist and as an ex-engineer, I would like to heartily state that the above recommendation is woefully under-powered, that is, it does not go far enough. Rather, I would suggest the following steps, in order to create a REALLY high-quality cache hide:

  • using a roto-hammer tool (you can rent them from Home Depot by the hour or by the day), drill one hundred pilot holes of 1/4" diameter to a depth of 8 inches in the concrete. Space the 100 holes in an even grid with each hole three inches apart in both a vertical direction and a horizontal direction from its neighbor.
  • after the one hundred 1/4" diameter pilot holes have been drilled, use a larger bit to enlarge each hole to diameter of one inch and a depth of 8 inches.
  • using a bucket of freshly-mixed Quick-concrete, mount one each of the largest size Bison tube available (about 3/4" diameter) in each hole to a depth of four inches and then seal the hole completely with the concrete.
  • in 99 of the Bison tubes, you will enclose simply a brief note reading "DECOY -- THIS IS NOT THE CACHE! KEEP LOOKING!"
  • in only one of the Bison tubes, you will install the scroll logbook and a small pencil.
  • list the cache as a Difficulty 5 cache, and as Terrain 5, and state explicitly on the cache listing page that this is a 5/5 cache, and that finders will need to bring a gasoline engine-driven air compressor and an air-driven jackhammer with three spare chisel bits in order to find and extract each of the 100 containers in order to find the real cache container, and that they will also need to bring a bag of concrete and a bucket of water for use in mixing the concrete (which will be used to replace the tubes and to fill all the holes after doing so) along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete..
  • In case you are wondering, the cache deserves the Terrain 5 rating because of the special equipment required to be used by each finder, namely, the gasoline engine-driven air compressor, the jackhammer and chisel bits, the bag of concrete and the bucket of water, along with a spare bucket for mixing and some tools for applying the wet concrete.

Presto! You now have a world-class 5/5 cache, and you will be able to brag about it during mealtimes at the state pen while serving your 15 year felony conviction for destroying municipal infrastructure! :D:D:D:blink::cool::D

 

:blink:

Great idea! I actually own a hammer-drill, its about 9:30 PM here, so I can swing by the Home-Depot for some concrete before it closes (They close at 10 around here). I should be able to make it to GZ at 10:30 and I can start hammer-drilling away. Its an electric drill so I will just have to bring my generator too. I am sure I can do this stealthy. :D

Hey, this sounds like a great idea, and you are making the whole project sound like lots of fun! So, if you never got around to doing the task last nite, let me know via PM or email, and I will grab my hardhat and reflective safety vest, and drive to the cache hide site to join you, and we can do it together, wearing our hard hats and safety vests. Fun! :D:D

Link to comment
What I was trying to say in my instructions was that each bison tube should be inserted fully into the hole, to a depth of a few inches, in other words, the nearest end of the tube should be at lest two to three inches into the hole, and the hole then backfilled with concrete.

 

:blink::cool::blink::D:D

 

Now my DNFs don't hurt so much.

Link to comment

I was driving around today looking for caches that were recently placed in my area, and I spotted a new little bridge being build. The bridge is made all out of smooth concrete and when you are underneath its more like a storm drain than a bridge. This thing is screaming for a easy to find micro :blink:. However there are no crevices to hide a container in. So here is my question, how would you attach a bison tube (or similar) to smooth concrete without defacing property?

 

Note: Please do not make this post about not liking micros, etc. I am just asking for some advise, thank you!

Just use retaining wall capstone adheasive, it is concrete coloured and will darkin with the stone, plus some varieties can be removed later.

 

With that said though is there not some restrictions due to 9-11 that it might not be wise to hide around an active transportation structor, I thought Cache Agent (A reviewer) had given is restrictions.

 

8|

Link to comment

Take another read of his post. He walks all the way up to the guideline, but his method does not violate it.

It violates the spirit and the intent. I have to say, if that method of hide were to show up in a park I managed, we would go to full permission required. I suspect if I wasn't also a cacher I would probably ban caches outright based on a buried cache and it wouldnt matter to me the land manager if you used a shovel or a hammer.

You might not like it, but reviewers have weighed in on this method and found it to be acceptable.

Edited by sbell111
Link to comment
sounds like this may be a "small" pedestrian bridge, which may not apply.

 

personally, I'd think it may be a good idea to avoid bridges altogether, but that's up to the OP and his/her reviewer.

This person always says it best .Just dont do it So many great places to hide .

Salute once again BAD_CRC

Why?

 

Small bridges like that are not terrorist targets.

Edited by sbell111
Link to comment
sounds like this may be a "small" pedestrian bridge, which may not apply.

 

personally, I'd think it may be a good idea to avoid bridges altogether, but that's up to the OP and his/her reviewer.

This person always says it best .Just dont do it So many great places to hide .

Salute once again BAD_CRC

 

I also have 2 caches involving 3 non-active railroad bridges, got approved without problems. Just because it a "bridge" does not mean its a terrorist target.

 

Once again the "bridge" in question is a very small bridge that allows people to cross a stream that you can jump over to get into a new residential neighborhood. From the stream to the "roof" its about 5 feet. Its basically a road with a drain in it.

Link to comment

Bison tubes are aluminum and fairly easy to drill. I've drilled a small hole through one and attached a rare earth magnet with a fine bolt and nut. (The tube I used had about 1/2" of solid Al at the end.) If there is a steel culvert running over the stream, the tube with a magnet can be attached to it.

 

That said, you might not assume that it is an easy cache. I have attached magnets to a film canister and placed it under an old stone pedestrian bridge in a greenway. (2/2 rating) It's driven a few cachers (temporarily) nuts and at least one suggestion that I up the ratings.

Link to comment

Bison tubes are aluminum and fairly easy to drill. I've drilled a small hole through one and attached a rare earth magnet with a fine bolt and nut. (The tube I used had about 1/2" of solid Al at the end.) If there is a steel culvert running over the stream, the tube with a magnet can be attached to it.

Why would you drill the bison tube and potentially destroy it's water resistance when you could simply attach the magnet to the ring?

Link to comment

What you need is a Roto Hammer and a two part concrete epoxy. Drill 1" into the concrete using a 5/8" drill bit to place Bison tube just deep enough to leave the cap sticking out. Glue in place. All that is needed by finders is to unscrew the cap to retrieve the log, sign, and return log/cap.

You could gat arrested for defacing property. I think the original question included "without defacing property"

Edited by Geo-Joe-N-Josh
Link to comment

So here is my question, how would you attach a bison tube (or similar) to smooth concrete without defacing property?

 

I've seen items attached to concrete with a type of mastic/adhesive that was grey in color, went on with a small putty knife and dried to a hard substance. But, I can't remember the name of it. The tube could be attached with a small dab of that. No structural damage from that, just cosmetic. I'll try some research to see if I can find the name of it.

 

Just so long as it is only cosmetic damage.

 

Ummmm.... the first definition of DEFACE is COSMETIC DAMAGE. How can one presume that doing cosmetic damage is not, in fact, defacement?

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 2
×
×
  • Create New...