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Winter Caching


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I went out the other day after a fresh snow fall geocaching and as I finished my first cach I thought, " If anyone followed my tracks, especially muggles they would lead directly to a cache and and easy steal. I did one more and choise to stop because of this.

 

My question is How do others feel about caching in the snow? and also to those who have a cache hidden, How do you feel about your cache being found in the snow?

 

I am new to this and just wanna make sure I do my part in keeping muggles away and keeping caches hidden. Just would like to hear from some of the other geocachers out there and their opinions on this.

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I went out the other day after a fresh snow fall geocaching and as I finished my first cach I thought, " If anyone followed my tracks, especially muggles they would lead directly to a cache and and easy steal. I did one more and choise to stop because of this.

 

My question is How do others feel about caching in the snow? and also to those who have a cache hidden, How do you feel about your cache being found in the snow?

 

I am new to this and just wanna make sure I do my part in keeping muggles away and keeping caches hidden. Just would like to hear from some of the other geocachers out there and their opinions on this.

We just got enough snow to leave track so I have moved to doing virtuals for awhile. I don't want to leave tracks in the snow to a cache and really don't want to follow tracks to a cache either so virtuals outdoors and solving puzzles indoors will be it for me for awhile.

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Winter's the time to go get all those tough caches! We follow the trails, too. :drama:

Seriously, I try to plan my runs around the weather. If it's going to snow in the next day or two, or the wind will be picking up, it hides the footprints pretty fast.

 

Of course, the other option is to go hit all those urban micros many people hate. We typically get one or two series just for the winter, to keep us from going completely whacko.

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If anybody tries to follow my tracks - good luck to them. I tend to do a lot of walking around in circles when caching.

When winter caching in snow I'll sometimes make tracks all over the place to confuse people.

I enjoy caching in the snow. I try to lay down enough tracks to confuse anyone may cross my trail, sometimes myself.

That is the trick in the snow, make lots of extra tracks. Some caches are actually easier in winter, such as those magnetic caches under bridges. If the water is frozen, you can just walk out on it to spot the cache.

Edited by Geoboss
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We love caching in the snow. Most cachers go into hibernation in the winter, and so do muggles. So there won't be many muggles out anyway to see your tracks meandering to the cache.

 

One of the things we love most about Snow Caching is all the little animal pawprints in the snow. You may be hiking through a stand of woods that is dead-quiet and seems deserted, yet at your feet in the snow is the evidence of hundreds of squirrels, field mice, deer, porcupines, etc. One of the greatest pleasures of geocaching :huh: !

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we had a new cache pop up less than 5 miles from home so off we went! after 90 minutes of searching at GZ with no find we gave up hope and left. We definitely left enough footprints in the area but we did a pretty extensive search in a 100' radius so good luck following our tracks on this one! :)

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After business trip to Vegas I continued on vacation and went Geocaching where there was plenty of snow but mainly cold. I went to the Grand Canyon (found really tough virtual caches with good questions), Monument Valley, Bryce Canyon (required good hike into Delicate Arch) and Bryce Canyon (was minus 9 degrees at sunrise). I didn't worry about my footprints, no one else was crazy enough to want to enjoy what I was experiencing. All it takes is common sense. Go out and enjoy regardless of the weather.

 

stroute :)

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I think it's important to leave tracks that 'decoy' people away from the cache.

 

once you find it, don't double back exactly on your trail so the tracks stop right at the cache, keep going past the cache in a straight line, and perhaps stop at some other trees or whatever as well so the one with the cache isn't out of the ordinary.

 

I actually find leaving 'fake' tracks almost as much fun as finding the cache in the winter, sometimes I'll leave a message or a smiley face in the snow with tracks in case the next cacher is following my trail.

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We are new to the sport as well and this is our first winter to cache. At first we thought we would hibernate until spring, but am glad we are out in the middle of winter looking for caches(well except for today with -27 celcius and a windchill that is off the scale).{that is really cold for my American friends out there!!!}

I think that leaving tracks behind is all part of the game and I like the idea of making false paths and tracks. Without the overhead tree cover the GPSr works real great as well.

Happy caching!!! :)

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Caching in the snow is fun. However, foot prints have never helped me. If the footprints lead right to the cache it has always been easy to begin with and the tracks were no help. If its a tough hide there are tracks everywhere from everyone searching and they dont help since they lead no where specifically.

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I'm not big on it. I usually don't go, but some friends and I made plans to go on Saturday. Up until then, it was completely clear, and then it snowed overnight, leaving 3-4" of fresh white stuff around the place. We went hunting, and found 5-6 caches, and DNF'd a few... but I think I'll stick to snowless caching. I do have to admit that a bunch of people hunting around one of those urban micros where you look suspicious, I didn't feel as suspicious looking with the group, since people driving by probably just thought we were moving around to keep warm!

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Footprints aside. . . . I love caching in the winter and the snow for several reasons. It is quieter with all the muggles huddled indoors, no bees or spiders to deal with and I hate both, no poisonous plants to contend with, and the woods are open so you can see wild life easier and can pause -sometimes for a remarkably long time - and enjoy the caching experience more fully. To each his own I guess.

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I went out the other day after a fresh snow fall geocaching and as I finished my first cach I thought, " If anyone followed my tracks, especially muggles they would lead directly to a cache and and easy steal. I did one more and choise to stop because of this.

 

My question is How do others feel about caching in the snow? and also to those who have a cache hidden, How do you feel about your cache being found in the snow?

 

I am new to this and just wanna make sure I do my part in keeping muggles away and keeping caches hidden. Just would like to hear from some of the other geocachers out there and their opinions on this.

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