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Summiting Mt. Rainier


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Watching the Discovery channel show Everest: Beyond the Limit got me thinking about Mt. Rainier and how great it would be to stand up on top. I've decided to make summiting Mt. Rainier my New Years resolution and I want to go about it the right way. I've been doing some research but I wanted to ask in general for some ideas...

 

What kind of equipment will I need to have? Down to what type of clothing should I wear (jacket, snowpants, boots, gloves, head gear, layers, ice axe, crampons, etc.). What type of general supplies are must haves (food, first aid, how much water, communication equipment, etc.).

 

What will be the best summer month to do this? I was thinking late June/July. When is the safest time? When will I have the best chance of actually making the summit and not being stopped by weather?

 

What skills will I need to have to do this safely and successfully? Are there classes in the Seattle area that would be good for training and learning mountaineering skills?

 

Where should I look for a guided trip? I'd like to make a full weekend of it and go with a guided group - so where should I find info on these and how soon should I look into booking?

 

And finally...who's interested in going with me? :grin: There's an earthcache to be claimed on top - Rainier Summit Earthcache

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Funny, this is actually on my "new year's resolution", as well. Or as close as I'm getting to one. I started a list of all the things that I'd like to do if I get well enough.

 

My husband's a big outdoors person, and one of the biggest things he's wanted to do is to climb Mt. Rainier (he'd like to climb other things, but that's the closest and most realistic one). I've always said over my dead body. But now I say, if I can physically do it, I'm there! :grin:

 

We've had friend's who've done it, although they're not geocachers (at least not anymore). Mt. Rainier is one of our favorite places in Washington, and we've tried to make it a goal to visit every year. I hope that you have a great time!!! :)

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Good for you - great goal!!

 

There are several local guide services that specialize in Rainier summits. They are experts in everything you mention, and provide the necessary training, as well. I would recommend going with one of them for their expertise and safety. Sorry I don't know names off-hand, but I have friends and colleagues who've used them, and had great things to say (whether they summitted or not). Ask at REI or do an online search and I bet they'll pop up.

 

I have some interest in trying for the Rainier summit, so let me know what happens! (I watched both seasons of Everest: Beyond the Limit too. Glad Moens and Tim both made it this year. :grin:)

Edited by hydnsek
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This is what you are looking for: http://www.rmiguides.com/index.html

 

I summited with Rainier Mountaineering Inc guides some years back. I believe they are still the only guides allowed on the mountain. It is run by one of the Whittker's (I probably misspelled that), Lou I think, whom I have met. Many of the guides including the ones I was with have summited Everest. My experience took place one late June, the weather was very iffy. Going with the guides gives you the best chance of success but it comes at a convience cost, that being you do not have a chance to stop at your convience and adjust your needs. For me it was a combination of cooking and freezing, often at the same time. Mostly freezing. I thought for sure my feet were froze solid as well as my nose. With the guides you are always roped together as you should be, but be aware that potty breaks are public and in mixed company. My water bottle was solid ice, my snacks seemed no better than frozen sawdust up there. At the time I was running marathons but I still barely made it to the top. Believe me it was grueling work, but it was also a lifetime goal and well worth it. The visual experience of that enviornment was fabulous, and I am not talking of the view, but the mountain itself. An awesome thing. As far as the view goes, we were in between two cloud layers and did not see a whole lot other than an airliner passing below us.

 

I'll see if i can dig up my old info on it. At the time the cost was $550, make it or not, probably more now. After the climb I wrote it up for one of my books I give to family. I suggest you do the same as soon as you get home. The very next day when it is still fresh in mind.

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Just a quick outline of our climb:

June 27, 1993 we hiked up to Camp Muir with it snowing part of the way and spent the night(?) in the RMI climbing shack, stacked like coordwood 2 or 3 to a platform. Roused and underway at 12:30, roped with headlamps and crossing the first glacier in the dark and in the snow. Nice golden red sunrise as we were crossing disappointment cleaver, before the sun dissappeared. Temps in the mid twenties or colder and wind 15 to 20 MPH to the top. Top reached at 8:30am. About 20 mins on the top, still cold and windy so we had to stay roped. Down to Camp Muir I think around Noon or so, with a short stay to grab out stuff and down to the parking lot by about 3:30 or 4pm.

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Quite the Lofty New Years resolution you have, and I commend you on that. I would love to someday get my hiking skills up to that level. Keep us posted on your progress, and Good Luck.

 

Note: Isn't Everest: Beyond The Limit a great show? Too Bad it looks like season two may be the last. :o Looks like Russell might be calling it quits. The pressure is just too much for him, understandably so.

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Unless I move to the US again and get in MUCH better shape (which isn't likely, lol) this would remain just a dream for me.

 

I did want to thank you for posting the link to the cache, I really enjoyed looking at the photos there from those who have done the cache!

 

Naomi :o

 

PS... I absolutely LOVE the view of Ranier from Tacoma and Seattle... it always reminds me of some kind of oil painting or something that the artist puts safely away when the weather isn't worthy of viewing it!

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My son Tom who is now 59 and lives in Alaska was a guide for Lou on Mt. Rainier when he was in his late teens. I was active in the Olympic College Mountaineering program but not a real climber. My son Tom and his friend John Luz wanted to join a team to climb Denali. Being a poor school teacher I told Tom that we could not jeopardize the family and would not sign the waver. John is still up on the mountain as he and another climber fell into a crevasse. Our granddaughter is now a guide on Denali. Two years ago they got blown off the mountain within 1000 feet of the summit and lost most of their gear. This year she said the weather was good and it was an easy climb. As the old timer mountineers use to tell us "The mountains don't CARE". On the other hand the guides use to brag that two good guides in good weather could take a cow to the summit of Mt. Rainier. Just get youself in the best possible shape you can and enjoy the experience.

Edited by W7WT
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Thank you everyone for your well wishes! Thank you Eraseek for the personal account of your journey - I like to hear those stories so I can know what to really expect.

 

Good recommendation on Mt. Adams, Klossner. A friend of mine are going to be looking into some good training hikes before tackling Rainier. I'm thinking I definitely want to do a Camp Muir day sometime before if anyone is interested!

 

Any recommendations on gear? I'm going to try to take advantage of some late winter sales for jackets, snowpants and boots. Does anyone know if under armour would be a good idea for this kind of trek?

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Any recommendations on gear?
Winter boots, crampons that fit, snow gators, an ice axe and training in how to use it. You want to spend a few hours practicing self-arrest with the ice axe so it will be instinctive when you suddenly find yourself transformed into a human luge.

 

A jacket with "pit zips" so you can open up ventilation holes under the sleeves. (But wear an old jacket for ice axe practice. I ripped a big hole in my brand-new $$$ REI jacket the first day I wore it.)

 

Serious gloves. I have four pairs with increasing amounts of insulation.

 

Make sure all of your clothing is made of plastic and/or wool, no cotton. When it gets wet, cotton holds the moisture against your skin.

 

Wrap-around dark glasses so you can see on the snow fields.

 

If you're going to glissade in a sitting position, you'll want thick snow pants, but these can be too hot during the ascent. I know people who bring custom hard-rubber mats to serve as roll-up personal sleds.

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Definately do a trip or two up Muir first. (If I am able I would like to go along but a new knee is somewhere in my future). I have done Mt Adams a couple of times and it is also a great one to do. Much less technical than Rainier but still plenty of alititude. I did Adams alone with no problems. You can't do that on Rainier.

If you do Adams, drive down and hike up to about 8000', just below Lunch Counter, and camp there. Up and going at 5am (use crampons and Ice axe). Top at about noon or 1pm as I recall, and down to the car the same day. Worked well for me.

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A couple of thoughts (from my experience): Training hikes: Little Si to start with, Mt Si later on. Carry a full pack (the one you will use if possible) so your body is used to it - train with more weight than you'll carry: the actually climb will feel easier then & you'll be working with a little less oxygen then you are used to. Add ankle weights to simulate the extra weight of Mtn boots & crampons (it's surprising how much more work it is to lift the feet with a couple of extra pounds on it). Work up to being able to do back to back hard hike days - that's what you'll be doing on the mountain.

 

If you can schedule a three day trip (Paradise to Muir, Muir to Ingram Flats, Flats to summit and out to cars) you find it easier (the middle day is very easy, but allows you to acclimitize). If you can spend the night before at Paradise, that will help also (are they reopened yet?).

 

Clothes: Pile pants and jacket. Long johns, tops and bottoms. Rain coat & pants (also acts as wind clothes) - pit zips very handy, full side zip pants allow you to put on/take off with crampons on, also helps with venting. Boots with wiggle room for the toes (tight ones will restrict blood flow, causing cold feet). Balaclava for head/neck - there are thin ones that fit under helmets. Thin liner gloves so you can "do things" without bare skin, warm mitts & overgloves (some have pile mitts built in or removeable) to keep you warm and dry. Good sunglasses - designed for max UV protection (your over the counter ones won't cut it) and dark.

 

Most specialized mountain climbing gear can be rented (or supplied by guides): ice axe, helmet, harness and such. But knowledge to use them must be gained. Most guide services have teaching/practice days.

 

Food: Bring things you like. On the mountain isn't the time to experiment. Bring twice what you would eat down here - you'll being doing more work, and keeping warm (which burns lots of energy). If you have room and weight, a thermos is a wonderful thing to bring. You fill it the night before and in the "morning" (very early, Midnight to 2am is normal get up) you can have a hot drink before you crawl out of the nice warm sleeping bag and another while getting the clothes warmed up (with your body!). Coffee and tea aren't the best as they are diuretics (making you pee more) - for every three cups you drink you get two. Hot cocoa and cider are good.

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Oh awesome, thanks! I will definitely try to attend that if I can. Just looking at the cost of the guided trips, my friend and I are considering just forming our own group. We have some people who have mountaineering experience lined up to go with us. We're also trying to find at least one person who has summited before to come along as well. Anyone interested or know anyone who would be? ;)

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Oh awesome, thanks! I will definitely try to attend that if I can. Just looking at the cost of the guided trips, my friend and I are considering just forming our own group. We have some people who have mountaineering experience lined up to go with us. We're also trying to find at least one person who has summited before to come along as well. Anyone interested or know anyone who would be? ;)

You might try contacting Cruiser Guy. He has some friends that that have summited (the ones that we camped with last summer for the Camp Muir climb)

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Hmmm... OK, Rainier is a fun hike, unless you go via Camp Hazard or unauthorized Willis Wall.

 

Now, first do you want to rush up or nice easy venture and have fun?

RMI can rush you then drop you if you are not prepared. That's money out the door.

 

Do you want to get in shape? Remember you do not run up a mountain, it is one rest step at a time.

 

Now, here's a suggestion from someone who has spend 40 years hiking/climbing all over the place.

 

My favorite work out is Mt Si, fine a comfortable pack [internal frame].

Save yourself 4-8 plastic 1 gallon milk containers including lids. Start with 1-2, just to gain your strength. As you feel comfortable with that weight add 1 more.

 

Do Mt Si once a week but during the week go for a walk every day with the same weight as what you are going to do Mt Si. No less than 2 hours.

 

Now this may sound crazy but you can do it. Keep this up until you can do all the containers up Mt Si to the Haystack and back to Parking lot in 2 hours 30 minutes. Yes, you read that correctly.

 

WAIT DON'T PANIC!! You empty the containers at the top!

 

Yes, you can just push yourself. No Pain, No Gain! Just keep telling yourself you can do it.

 

Do Not Cheat, do your work out everyday even if it is pouring outside or the weather is beautiful.

 

Good luck on your adventure, you will enjoy it if you are in shape and ready. Find a class such as Mountaineers course to understand safety and the in & out of self arrest.

Go out now and learn to be in the cold. Turn that car heater off so you acclimate yourself to the cold, once your step outside it will not feel cold to you.

 

:D MtnMutt

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This is what you are looking for: http://www.rmiguides.com/index.html

 

I summited with Rainier Mountaineering Inc guides some years back. I believe they are still the only guides allowed on the mountain. It is run by one of the Whittker's (I probably misspelled that), Lou I think, whom I have met.

We met Lou at "The Search". Rainier Mountaineering Inc was having guide auditions that day.

 

Lou Whittaker arrives and autographs kitelady's book!

322242_1100.jpg

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Oh awesome, thanks! I will definitely try to attend that if I can. Just looking at the cost of the guided trips, my friend and I are considering just forming our own group. We have some people who have mountaineering experience lined up to go with us. We're also trying to find at least one person who has summited before to come along as well. Anyone interested or know anyone who would be? :D

Sorry, but when I summited I filled out the register with "It took me 41 years to reach the goal of summiting this mountain - remind me never to do it again!"

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When I met Lou on one of my trips up to Muir he was sitting on a rock at Muir hugging two mountain babes (an arm around each). We gave a passing nod to each other as I walk on by and up toward beehive. I climbed up aways to watch a guy on skies launch himself off the mountain toward the glacier below.

 

I am glad I did it (and made it) so I'd never have to try again. Awesome experience, tough as hell. If I had the youth and fitness perhaps I'd try again (with experienced friends)(not guides) but I don't.

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The beginning training seems to be going well for the big climb. I've been doing some easier hikes close to Seattle and have started carrying extra weight in my pack. I appreciate all the suggestions given so far, they are very helpful! I still have a lot of gear to acquire and am still open to suggestions.

 

In conjunction with the CITO on June 7th, I'm most likely planning to camp at Rainier that weekend and do a trip up to Camp Muir for training on the 8th. Feel free to come along! :laughing:

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I'm fortunate enough to have a job that offers me the opportunity to undertake many adventures that most people never get the chance to try. Although it is far from my number one responsibility, I'm required to maintain a certain capability in both rock climbing and alpine mountaineering. As such, my coworkers and I completed a 4-day training event in Mount Rainier National Park that culminated with a summit. While a person with a solid background in safe mountaineering practices can reasonably set a goal of ascent -> summit -> decent from Paradise and back within a 24 hour period, spreading the climb over a several day period is far safer and is less physically taxing.

 

If you make the climb with Rainier Mountaineering Incorporated, I believe that they do most of their summits in three legs: Paradise (~5,200 feet) to Camp Muir (~10,000 feet), Camp Muir to the summit (14,411 feet) and back using the Disappointment Cleaver route, and then Muir back to Paradise. I don't know if they do the second two legs in one day or two.

 

A couple of things to keep in mind should you summit independent of a guide company... First, if you don't go with a guide outfit, ensure that you have several people in your group who are intimately familiar with sound alpine mountaineering tasks. There are a lot of things that can easily kill you up there if you don't know what you're doing. Second, ensure that whichever group you end up with (a guide or knowledgeable friends), they spend time teaching you the basics of glacier travel, rope teams, self arrest, crevasse rescue, avalanche procedures, etc. Finally, you are better off moving beyond Muir and making camp at Ingram Flats (~11,200 feet). You're more likely to beat the rush of the guided groups and not get caught in traffic jams if people ahead of you are climbing slowly.

 

The two months with the largest number of successful summit attempts are July and August. If you go during that period, however, you must be aware of the dangers that go along with it. Higher temperatures during the day lead to snow and ice melting. For this reason, your best bet is to begin your summit attempt at around 11 PM or midnight. Yes, you're doing most of the ascent from camp in the dark with headlamps, but it is still safer than the alternative. If you summit too late in the morning, there is a much higher possibility of having the ice bridge you may have crossed on the way up without even realizing it being melted out or much less stable on your way down.

 

When my group summited in August 06, we left from Ingram Flats and were the first to the top that day. The drawback is that the RMI guides who were probably bringing a fresh log book to the summit that day were well behind us so there was no book up top (the case was empty).

 

Aside from having some knowledgeable people in your group, you MUST have decent gear. At 7:30 AM on 25 AUG 06 it was brutally cold and windy up top. I would estimate that it was about 15 degrees fahrenheit and the winds were arong 50 mph. That kind of cold and wind combined with the disorientation of Acute Mountain Syndrome leads to the kind of bad decision making that gets people killed.

 

The Dissapointment Cleaver route is not technical at all. You can literally walk to the top and back if you know the route and practice appropriate safety.

 

Hope that helps some.

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All that info does help, keep it coming!

 

My group has decided not to go with a guided service, but half of the group has summited Rainier before and has extensive mountaineering experience so I feel like I'll be in good hands. :P We're looking at late June for our trek - I want to go this early so that if the weather is bad and we can't reach the summit I'll still have time to attempt again later this summer.

 

I've been having a blast checking out gear, but still need to get things like an ice axe, tent, down jacket, etc.

 

Any tips on ways to help deal with the altitude? I was fine at Camp Muir last year, but since 10,000' is the highest I've been I'm not sure what to expect beyond that.

 

Much more training to be done!!

 

:laughing:

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All that info does help, keep it coming!

 

My group has decided not to go with a guided service, but half of the group has summited Rainier before and has extensive mountaineering experience so I feel like I'll be in good hands. :P We're looking at late June for our trek - I want to go this early so that if the weather is bad and we can't reach the summit I'll still have time to attempt again later this summer.

 

I've been having a blast checking out gear, but still need to get things like an ice axe, tent, down jacket, etc.

 

Any tips on ways to help deal with the altitude? I was fine at Camp Muir last year, but since 10,000' is the highest I've been I'm not sure what to expect beyond that.

 

Much more training to be done!!

 

:laughing:

AMS - Acute Mountain Sickness - is very, very common on Mt Rainier. And some people are more affected by it than others. But when you go from sea level to 14,000+ feet in couple of days you have little or no time to aclimitize. You can do some to help minimize it, but it does mean adjusting your plans some. If you spend the night before at Paradise (assuming the DC route), one night at Camp Muir (which is just over the 'normal' limit for AMS, i.e.. 8,000), the second night at Ingram Flats (about 2000 feet higher, a very easy day) and summit the third day, this gives you a little time to adapt.

 

Drink plenty of fluids - coffee and tea are diuretics (sp?) and will only give you 2 cups for every 3 you drink - you don't really realize how much you can loose while climbing (cold, sweating, altitude all contribute). I really like the hydration systems available now (CamalBak is my choice) as they make drinking on the go so much easier. Avoid alcohol.

 

Be well rested before you start - many people have trouble sleeping up there (and going to bed at 8pm to get up at midnight doesn't help).

 

Headache and flu like feelings are the main signs of AMS. Stopping, resting, drinking and taking something for the headache (asprin, IB, Tylonal - avoid narcotics) may help; but if the symptoms continue or get worse the only 'cure' is decending to lower elevation.

 

There is one drug - Diamox (a brand name) or acetazolamide - that is used to help stave off AMS (I use it myself). It requires a prescription, but shouldn't take more that a visit to the doc to get. It helps by changing the blood chemistry to allow you to 'blow off' CO2 (panting/heavy breathing) without affect and helping reduce the sleeping problems associated with altitude.

Edited by The Jester
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Sorry for the late answer. Haven't been on this forum in a bit...

 

Anyway, to answer some of your questions..

 

1. Gear - My guys and I went up with 95-100 pound rucksacks because our purpose there was to conduct as much alpine mountaineering sustainment training. You can go MUCH lighter than that, but there are still items you simply can't go without. The following gear is an absolute requirement.

 

a. Minimal stuff would be sufficient clothing to layer as appropriate based on changing temperatures. Waterproof and breathable outerwear is also a must because the weather can deteriorate rapidly and you imply can't afford to get wet. With the winds and temps on the mountain, being wet can lead to hypothermia before you even realize it.

 

b. A climbing helmet.

 

c. An ice axe.

 

d. A climbing harness with plenty of carabiners.

 

e. Crampons.

 

f. A compass, map, and GPS. Technically not everyone needs these but I wouldn't want to be the guy who gets separated in bad weather but his buddy has the navigational gear.

 

g. Approach boots (from Paradise to the Muir Snowfield or Camp Muir itself) and alpine boots that will accept crampons for any glacier travel.

 

h. It would be a good idea for everyone to have at least an FRS radio (motorola or other).

 

i. An avalanche beacon. Your experienced buddies can fill you in on its use.

 

j. A warm sleeping bag and a sleeping mat.

 

k. Sufficient glasses or goggles to protect your eyes from snow blindness.

 

l. Stuff that you should have at least one of for every three people in the party: camp stove with extra fuel, a pot for boiling water (there are certainly no water fountains so all your water comes from melted snow), a water purification device (we use Katadynes to filter the melted snow water), sufficient rope to ensure that all team members are tied off to one another, a tent, and a folding snow shovel. Sleeping bags and tents can be left at Ingram Flats during the summit attempt but you really should take at least one tent and one sleeping bag for the team during the summit.

 

2. Jester covered AMS pretty well. About half of my guys suffered from it to one degree or another. Symptoms are as described. The diamox can help, but there are consequences (you need to start it two days before climbing, you must drink a lot more water since it dehydrates you, and it makes you more sensitive to the sun; that's the last thing you need when the sun is beating down during the day and reflecting back at you off all the snow and ice). There really isn't a definitive treatment for altitude-related illnesses beyond descending to a lower altitude. Some may tell you that HAPE (High Altitude Pulmonary Edema) or HACE (High Altitude Cerebral Edema) are a threat but there has never been a documented case of either below 15,000 feet. If you know where your going, moving quickly, and summit during a 24-hour period you can probably get up and down before AMS can hit but most people can't do it that quickly.

 

The bottom line is that if you get decent gear, have knowledgeable people with you, and are in fair shape you can summit pretty easily. That said, don't ever underestimate a mountain like that...

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2. Jester covered AMS pretty well. About half of my guys suffered from it to one degree or another. Symptoms are as described. The diamox can help, but there are consequences (you need to start it two days before climbing, you must drink a lot more water since it dehydrates you, and it makes you more sensitive to the sun; that's the last thing you need when the sun is beating down during the day and reflecting back at you off all the snow and ice). There really isn't a definitive treatment for altitude-related illnesses beyond descending to a lower altitude. Some may tell you that HAPE (High Altitude Pulmonary Edema) or HACE (High Altitude Cerebral Edema) are a threat but there has never been a documented case of either below 15,000 feet. If you know where your going, moving quickly, and summit during a 24-hour period you can probably get up and down before AMS can hit but most people can't do it that quickly.

A quick comment on the bolded line above, the newest info says start day of climb and for two days (at altitude - i.e.. if you're on a two day climb, stop taking after you've decended) after, at 1/2 the 'old' dosage.

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Geocachings very own Annie Love had one of her pictures in todays Seattle P-I Getaways. It's on the last page, myseattlepix, reader adventures. Is this a new feature? I've never noticed it before.

Annie... Annie... You know, you'd THINK that name would ring a bell. ;)

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Geocachings very own Annie Love had one of her pictures in todays Seattle P-I Getaways. It's on the last page, myseattlepix, reader adventures. Is this a new feature? I've never noticed it before.

Since the photo in Getaways is black and white and so small, here's the color photo she posted to the cache page. Nice photo, Annie!

 

78602fb3-87a8-49b3-bd1b-14239c7073cb.jpg

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No kidding!! That's great, Annie!

 

Good thing I just stuck Bananna Slugs and High Places on my watchlist - I got a friend (no names here, but it starts with a J and ends with a Boy) that made it to Camp Muir this weekend too! I wonder if you maybe even passed eachother on the trail??

 

So cool. I can't wait to see the pics.

 

And fat CONGRATS, too!

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Yes, I did it!!! It was well worth all the training and preparation. And hey, I have all kinds of cool gear now too. :mad: Everyone's support - friends, family, coworkers, fellow geocachers, strangers, etc. was incredible and definitely helped keep me going throughout the way!

 

I decided to go with a guide service pretty much last minute. I booked my spot with them just a couple weeks ago and I took off for their training last Tuesday. We had a full day training class on Wednesday which was helpful. Thursday we hiked up to Camp Muir on a beautiful day! I pointed out the Banana Slugs and High Places cache to other climbers in the group - I'm pretty sure I've convinced several of them to take up geocaching! We had cozy accommodations in the RMI hut at Camp Muir for about 6 hours and then took off Friday morning at 12:30am for the top. We couldn't have asked for better weather or conditions on the trail. Everyone's tips along the way both training wise and during the hike were really helpful. I felt as thought I was adequately prepared for the journey and I got to snag that Earth cache on top! :ph34r:

 

Of course I have pictures on the cache page and my blog!

 

I highly recommend heading up there if you can. ;)

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