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Magellan Triton-What were you thinking?


redtailforester
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I have been a dedicated Magellan user for years. Essentially, I've used a Magellan product for my business and geocaching since I knew GPS existed. You couldn't pry my eXplorist out of my hands...that is until I got word about the new Triton series to be released. It wasn't more than a couple days until I had a Triton 500 ordered (unfortunately through DELL...another story).

 

Needless to say, I just receieved my Triton yesterday. I am very familiar with Magellan's software and operating systems and all I can say about the new "state of the art" Triton is . . . I'm going GARMIN. What was Magellan thinking when they released an unproven and very poor system like this to the public. I don't mind putting a little time in until I figure out a new system for my receivers but this is ridiculous.

 

On a positive note: AMAZING ACCURACY / QUICK SATs

 

On a negative note: You can't do anything with it!!! Magellan has made this supposedly user friendly interface system into something an astronaut couldn't figure out. Ground distance in miles when looking for geocaches and elevation above 4000 ft. The goto menus are just flat-out annoying and data transfer is horrible. What happened to doing a quickie GOTO on the background map on the eXplorist? Downloading maps from NG TOPO!...yeah right. That only takes an update, a couple more software transfers and a couple asprin.

 

Been using Magellans for years and this just isn't worth the time and patiences. It is a sad day for Magellan.

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I have been a dedicated Magellan user for years. Essentially, I've used a Magellan product for my business and geocaching since I knew GPS existed. You couldn't pry my eXplorist out of my hands...that is until I got word about the new Triton series to be released. It wasn't more than a couple days until I had a Triton 500 ordered (unfortunately through DELL...another story).

 

Needless to say, I just receieved my Triton yesterday. I am very familiar with Magellan's software and operating systems and all I can say about the new "state of the art" Triton is . . . I'm going GARMIN. What was Magellan thinking when they released an unproven and very poor system like this to the public. I don't mind putting a little time in until I figure out a new system for my receivers but this is ridiculous.

 

On a positive note: AMAZING ACCURACY / QUICK SATs

 

On a negative note: You can't do anything with it!!! Magellan has made this supposedly user friendly interface system into something an astronaut couldn't figure out. Ground distance in miles when looking for geocaches and elevation above 4000 ft. The goto menus are just flat-out annoying and data transfer is horrible. What happened to doing a quickie GOTO on the background map on the eXplorist? Downloading maps from NG TOPO!...yeah right. That only takes an update, a couple more software transfers and a couple asprin. Been using Magellans for years and this just isn't worth the time and patiences. It is a sad day for Magellan.

 

I have to agree. As a Magellan user myself, I was ready to pick up a Triton, and the only thing that made me hesitate was that I wasn't sure if it had a paperless caching option. I am now thankful I did not jump on this. The release and lack of support I have seen is apalling. I am now looking towards the Garmin Colorado. I'll wait and see how it goes, but it sounds promising and Garmin's customer support has a better reputation. I will have to bid Magellan farwell :anicute:

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I have been a dedicated Magellan user for years. Essentially, I've used a Magellan product for my business and geocaching since I knew GPS existed. You couldn't pry my eXplorist out of my hands...that is until I got word about the new Triton series to be released. It wasn't more than a couple days until I had a Triton 500 ordered (unfortunately through DELL...another story).

 

Needless to say, I just receieved my Triton yesterday. I am very familiar with Magellan's software and operating systems and all I can say about the new "state of the art" Triton is . . . I'm going GARMIN. What was Magellan thinking when they released an unproven and very poor system like this to the public. I don't mind putting a little time in until I figure out a new system for my receivers but this is ridiculous.

 

On a positive note: AMAZING ACCURACY / QUICK SATs

 

On a negative note: You can't do anything with it!!! Magellan has made this supposedly user friendly interface system into something an astronaut couldn't figure out. Ground distance in miles when looking for geocaches and elevation above 4000 ft. The goto menus are just flat-out annoying and data transfer is horrible. What happened to doing a quickie GOTO on the background map on the eXplorist? Downloading maps from NG TOPO!...yeah right. That only takes an update, a couple more software transfers and a couple asprin.

 

Been using Magellans for years and this just isn't worth the time and patiences. It is a sad day for Magellan.

That third turn is getting closer!

 

Norm

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Personally I love the Triton 400. Mine had issues and went back to the store, but I will purchase it again. My Walmart ran out of them. In the meantime, I will continue to use my explorist 500.

 

There are a lot of bugs to be worked out yet, but I remember the explorist line had similar issues. I also remember friends who had other types of new units also experiencing issues. I think it is the nature of a new product. There is also the learning curve that goes hand in hand with using a new product. I spent a day playing around with my Triton, manually inputting coordinates. The unit was FAST, and deadly accurate. It had very little, if any, boomerang. It was hard to tell for sure since I automatically slow down at 30m to let the unit catch up, but it led me right to the caches dead on...almost as if I were using a *gasp* Garmin. My friend also bought one, and we used it yesterday caching in Niagara. It was fantastic. There were 4 of us all with different units. Hers came closest to the cache with the best accuracy at each one.

 

The only thing that annoys me about the new Triton is that the features that I like best about the explorist are missing on the Triton, but the Triton has additional features that I would love to see on the explorist.

 

I would like to see bigger fonts used on the screens....My old eyes have trouble with small fonts. The explorist fonts were perfect in size. Also on the GOTO screen, it is missing the little dialogue boxes at the bottom of the screen to let you know how far the cache is. You have to actually select the cache to get all the information about it, and then escape if it isn't the one you want. There is also no way to mark a cache as found, unlike the explorist.

 

The buttons are a little slow to respond sometimes, so it was hard to know if I had not pressed it properly or it was still responding, and then I got impatient and pressed again and confused the thing.

 

You can add comments to waypoints, but not geocaches. Hints in geocache mode show the whole hint, and are not truncated.

 

The screen resolution is amazing, but it is hard to adjust screen brightness. Unlike the explorist where you can click through 3 levels of brightness, the Triton has basically 2 settings...off and on to the level you preselect in your settings. People have complained about the dim screen...you can just barely see it when it is set to off. I think that is a good feature...you know what I mean if you have ever used an explorist in the dark.

 

There are no projections. I know I hardly ever use this, but it seems to me that this should be a standard feature.

 

I HATE the way you have to manually enter coordinates. It takes much longer. You have to use a < button to scroll through to where you want to change the number, then go to the numbers and change all of them, even ones that are staying the same. If not, then you have to switch between a 123 and an ABC screen. Seems to me that on a manually entering coordinate screen, you should have all the options available for entering coordinates, NSEW, numbers and any signs used (degrees, feet etc) And really why even signs? If you have selected the navigation units, the gps should understand and not need that info.

 

There are minor bugs that will probably be fixed in uncoming firmware updates. Some people have complained about odometer settings...mine didn't have that issue. But if you change batteries, some of the settings have to be reset...so that is a pain. Hopefully they will add some tweaks in future firmware updates like they did for the explorist line (I remember getting a firmware update just before Christmas one year that added projections!)

 

I didn't jump right in buying the explorist and was glad that I hadn't. This time I did jump right in, and was frustrated when my unit acted up. (It locked up after downloading waypoints, and I couldn't get it unlocked. Nobody knows of a three button reset, so I just took it back...someday some person is going to get a great refurbished machine for half the price!) But I will definitely get one again. I think in about a month, a lot of the bugs will have been dealt with. If you can put up with it for that long, keep the machine. Otherwise, return it and buy a crappy Garmin.

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Sad to say, but I have to agree with you. I had so much hope for the Triton line, but Magellan stumbled coming out of the blocks.

 

stumbled, fell into a hole, impaled themselves on a knife, broke their leg, all while maintaining a weird silence.

 

And after watching their failure to do any type of firmware update for my eXplorist 600 for over 2 years, I am not holding out great hope for the Triton users.

 

here's hoping the Colorado 400t is the holy grail - at least for me.

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Sure...garmin. The Colorado's base model is over $500 USD. The base model Triton is just over $100. I paid $199 for the equivalent of an explorist 500 which I paid over $300 for and the Triton is much better. And Garmin maps suck. The Triton will be using NG TOPO...an improvement over anything either Magellan or Garmin puts out.

 

They make their money not on the hardware as much as the software. So a new Garmin would cost a small fortune to get started in. My Triton uses my old Mapsend products too. Total investment with taxes (13% in Ontario) is just around $225. Don't think you can beat that for a good product.

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Personally I love the Triton 400. Mine had issues and went back to the store, but I will purchase it again. My Walmart ran out of them. In the meantime, I will continue to use my explorist 500.

 

There are a lot of bugs to be worked out yet, but I remember the explorist line had similar issues. I also remember friends who had other types of new units also experiencing issues. I think it is the nature of a new product. There is also the learning curve that goes hand in hand with using a new product. I spent a day playing around with my Triton, manually inputting coordinates. The unit was FAST, and deadly accurate. It had very little, if any, boomerang. It was hard to tell for sure since I automatically slow down at 30m to let the unit catch up, but it led me right to the caches dead on...almost as if I were using a *gasp* Garmin. My friend also bought one, and we used it yesterday caching in Niagara. It was fantastic. There were 4 of us all with different units. Hers came closest to the cache with the best accuracy at each one.

 

The only thing that annoys me about the new Triton is that the features that I like best about the explorist are missing on the Triton, but the Triton has additional features that I would love to see on the explorist.

 

I would like to see bigger fonts used on the screens....My old eyes have trouble with small fonts. The explorist fonts were perfect in size. Also on the GOTO screen, it is missing the little dialogue boxes at the bottom of the screen to let you know how far the cache is. You have to actually select the cache to get all the information about it, and then escape if it isn't the one you want. There is also no way to mark a cache as found, unlike the explorist.

 

The buttons are a little slow to respond sometimes, so it was hard to know if I had not pressed it properly or it was still responding, and then I got impatient and pressed again and confused the thing.

 

You can add comments to waypoints, but not geocaches. Hints in geocache mode show the whole hint, and are not truncated.

 

The screen resolution is amazing, but it is hard to adjust screen brightness. Unlike the explorist where you can click through 3 levels of brightness, the Triton has basically 2 settings...off and on to the level you preselect in your settings. People have complained about the dim screen...you can just barely see it when it is set to off. I think that is a good feature...you know what I mean if you have ever used an explorist in the dark.

 

There are no projections. I know I hardly ever use this, but it seems to me that this should be a standard feature.

 

I HATE the way you have to manually enter coordinates. It takes much longer. You have to use a < button to scroll through to where you want to change the number, then go to the numbers and change all of them, even ones that are staying the same. If not, then you have to switch between a 123 and an ABC screen. Seems to me that on a manually entering coordinate screen, you should have all the options available for entering coordinates, NSEW, numbers and any signs used (degrees, feet etc) And really why even signs? If you have selected the navigation units, the gps should understand and not need that info.

 

There are minor bugs that will probably be fixed in uncoming firmware updates. Some people have complained about odometer settings...mine didn't have that issue. But if you change batteries, some of the settings have to be reset...so that is a pain. Hopefully they will add some tweaks in future firmware updates like they did for the explorist line (I remember getting a firmware update just before Christmas one year that added projections!)

 

I didn't jump right in buying the explorist and was glad that I hadn't. This time I did jump right in, and was frustrated when my unit acted up. (It locked up after downloading waypoints, and I couldn't get it unlocked. Nobody knows of a three button reset, so I just took it back...someday some person is going to get a great refurbished machine for half the price!) But I will definitely get one again. I think in about a month, a lot of the bugs will have been dealt with. If you can put up with it for that long, keep the machine. Otherwise, return it and buy a crappy Garmin.

These kinds of posts always make me wonder. First sentence says i love it but then it's all down hill from there! Hhmmmmmmm, i know of some swamp land down this way that i just know you would love. :anicute:

 

Seriously, why would you love a product that is slow, is hard to use, is missing key features, and then locks up to where it is unuseable?

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The Triton will be using NG TOPO...an improvement over anything either Magellan or Garmin puts out.

 

Note the "will be using NG TOPO" in this reply. I tried loading a NG map onto the Triton 500. This involved an update for the TOPO software just to recognize the Triton. Started loading and then the Triton completely froze up (I waited for over an hour). Maybe the Triton will someday be an amazing receiver but I have places to go and things to do in the meantime. Granted it is nice to have a GPSr for geocaching, hiking and enjoyment but my primary focus for a new receiver is for my business. The Triton let me down on all accounts.

 

As noted before, I have always had a Magellan in the woods with me until now. I have always preferred the interface that Magellan has offered with its receivers. If Magellan would have just worked out some of the minor bugs, I probably would have waited.

 

Perfect example: Doing a GOTO on the background map of an eXplorist vs. Triton. On the eXplorist, you use the little joystick and highlight your POI and BOOM! You are down the trail and running! The Triton...I lost count of how many screens and menus it took. Yes it does have the same pretty icons but who cares if you can't use them!? I thought one of the biggest selling points of the Triton was that you don't have to be a scientist to use it. Maybe for those that can afford the touchscreen 2000's that is the case...

 

I just bought a Garmin GPSMap 60CX for less than the Triton 500 (Garmin even has a $50 rebate to boot).

Edited by redtailforester
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And in my humble opinion, I have seen Magellans customer service/tech support implode. It is a shame to say because they were once very good with this. I know this isn't directly related to the hardware or software, but if you can't get help when you need it, what good is the product. The folks on this board have been a godsend a couple of times, but I should be able to rely on the company first.

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Once again I agree. This whole problem started for me back in November when I saw DELL advertising the Triton for less than anyone else at the time. Unfortunately, at the time I was unaware of Magellan's actual release date. I have spent more time speaking with outsourced customer service reps. from DELL and Magellan over these last couple months then I would ever like to in a lifetime. I have my own issues with DELL because of this but that's a story for a different day...

 

This has really hit me hard. Didn't ever expect to have anything other than a Magellan in my hand and NEVER thought I would have a Garmin in my pack. It is a shame.

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Once again I agree. This whole problem started for me back in November when I saw DELL advertising the Triton for less than anyone else at the time. Unfortunately, at the time I was unaware of Magellan's actual release date. I have spent more time speaking with outsourced customer service reps. from DELL and Magellan over these last couple months then I would ever like to in a lifetime. I have my own issues with DELL because of this but that's a story for a different day...

 

This has really hit me hard. Didn't ever expect to have anything other than a Magellan in my hand and NEVER thought I would have a Garmin in my pack. It is a shame.

 

I saw the Triton advertised at Dell for around $450 one day, and the next it was gone! I am curious as to anyone's experiences with Garmin customer/tech support, but that is for another thread in this forum.

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Here's a quickie on Dell. They advertised in November '07 that they would have Triton 500's available for delivery by the end of November for $237. Naturally, I was excited about the thought of having a Triton by year's end and got hooked in. The first delay brought us to the first week of December (knocked $20 off after an hour long complaint session). Second delay in my order shot me to the second week, then third and finally an estimated shipping date of Jan 31, 2008. Got sick of that and found a small story in Florida that had two 500's in stock. Cancelled my Dell order. Got to speak to most of the inhabitants of Bangladesh. Charming people...

 

At that point, I wasn't sure whom I was more upset with Dell vs. Magellan. Magellan obviously gave Dell permission to advertise for the Triton and promised them so many units before such a date. Never dealing with Dell again and most likely the same with Magellan...

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To answer the question, Magellan, what were you thinking? I believe this is what they were thinking:

1. Waypoints with photos and sound files attached. This is the next step in advances in GPSr use: Multi-media.

 

2. A computer interface that uses one program, VantagePoint for all interface with the GPSr, making it simple to use for the average person. A GPS interface that uses more pretty icons rather than written menus. A GPSr that has the processing power and screen resolution to do it all.

 

3. Use better maps for outdoor purposes.

 

As a long time Magellan user, owner of eXplorist, I returned the Triton 400 because:

1. As a more advanced user, like many here, I appreciate the file/folder/drive system of the eXplorist. I do not like the Track management of the Triton; I could not pull up a saved track in the unit; it does not fit my needs.

2. That the unit froze after loading waypoints, I felt that the unit is has too many bugs and is not reliable yet. I have complete confidence in my eXplorist in the field as far as reliability, reception, accuracy, great tracklogs.. The Triton failed before getting into the field.

3. The Triton interface/menu/icon is really made for a touch screen. I found it awkward and not intuitive. It is missing some things such as showing distance/direction when scrolling through waypoints. The 1500/200 are probably better in use.

4. VantagePoint does not have the filtering and features of a program such as GSAK for geocaches.

5. After using the internal Li-Ion battery, I really like it. Just place the eXplorist in its mount, on or off, and it auto charges and stops just like your cell phone.

 

The question is whether Magellan has a line that will be successful in this new iphone, multi-media world. What interface/data/file-management/maps do outdoor users, nerds, or geocachers need or want

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Redtailforester hit it right on the head. I did exactly the same thing...anxiously anticipated a Mag replacement for my MeriGold, sat through countless delays, only to find...a not-ready-for-prime-time offering that only delivered more frustration than I am willing to tolerate. After watching a less-than-successful eXplorist debacle with a friend, I only cautiously optomistic. Thankfully, I waited and did not actually close a transaction for a Triton - I had on at least two different occasions gotten as far as the checkout, once having even entered my card info, only to have a little voice in my head say "Are you sure?". For once in my life, I listened...and I do not regret it. Last week, I completed a transaction for a 60Csx for a net cost of $277...far better than I could do for a 1500 (the Triton I was targeting). My only real interest in additional maps would be for those capable of autorouting...so my venerable old Mapsend DRs were useless (likely, were anyway since they are -as far as I can tell - locked for use with a single SN). So, they're an additional cost regardless of which direction I went..and I find it hard to believe that, whenever Maggie gets around to releasing an auto-rpoute capable map for Tritons, it will fall under $100. So its a wash as far as maps go. I'm not sold that I want/need the addn'l features of a Colorado...but those having a coronary about the price tag on the 400t need to realize that it is right in the same ballpark of the 1500 or 2000.

 

But most appalling of it all is the incredible, deafening silence from Magellan. Of course, as one poster in another place opined, what would they say other than "Yep, we screwed up. But still trust us, now, you hear!"

 

No. Not anymore. Go prove yourself again before I'll spend any more money with you. That's the funny thing about trust...its so hard to build, yet so easy to destroy. You done screwed up bigtime, Maggie. Lots of us won't be back for a long time, if at all.

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I was going to buy a Triton 400, I have been using Magellan for many years. While I like the idea of a National Geographic map on a GPS screen, from what I am reading, at this time I have no plan to buy any Tritons.

Just that the Tritons do not support multi file storage in the SD card alone is a deal killer for me.

I read in the Yahoo Triton forums that Magellan is moving their tech support to the USA (Oklahoma) in May, at the rate Magellan is going they will only need on person to their Tech Support staff.

I may just buy another Explorist 500 for a back up.

 

As far as the Garmin Colorado 400T, no way will I spend $550.00 on a GPS for geocaching. The new "Wherigo game" does not sound like something that I would be interested in, besides I can always use my Pocket PC linked to one of my magellans if I want to try it out.

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I waited and waited for the Magellin Triton 2000 to come and make it my first GPS experience. Before it ever had a chance to come out I was able to use a Garmin 60CSx for several weeks. I fell in love with it and I am now a proud owner of the Garmin 60CSx. I am also new to Geocaching and love it also. I am sure happy I got the Garmin and not the Magellin or the Delorme PN20. I have read very little postive on both of those units and nothing but awesome reviews on the Garmin. I must say if anyone ask me, go Garmin. It is a proven and dedicated product.

 

Just wanted to share my thoughts.

 

Steve B)

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Sad to say, but I have to agree with you. I had so much hope for the Triton line, but Magellan stumbled coming out of the blocks.

 

stumbled, fell into a hole, impaled themselves on a knife, broke their leg, all while maintaining a weird silence.

 

And after watching their failure to do any type of firmware update for my eXplorist 600 for over 2 years, I am not holding out great hope for the Triton users.

 

here's hoping the Colorado 400t is the holy grail - at least for me.

 

That seals the deal for me. Originally, the Triton 400's price point was the main selling point for me. I wanted a Sirf chip, expandable memory, and color for around $200. My wife just pointed out to me that the ~$75 difference between what she paid for the Triton 400 and a comparable Garmin is not worth the aggravation. I guess that I'm in denial about Magellan coming through with timely firmware updates.

 

I posted a query, "Where can I find firmware updates?", to the Magellan website, and received a boilerplate e-mail response two days later, stating that there is currently no firmware update for the 400 and they are unable to promise when a future firmware update will be released.

 

I'll be returning the Triton to REI tomorrow for a Garmin Legend HCx.

 

Garmin Legend HCx

REI list price - $249

High Sensitivity? - Yes

Expandable Memory? - Yes

Color? - Yes

Battery life - 25 hours (AA x2)

Beta testing - in house

Tech support - Yes

Introduced to the market - June 2007

 

Magellan Triton 400

REI list price - $199

High Sensitivity? - Yes

Expandable Memory? - Yes

Color? - Yes

Battery life - 10 hours (AA x2)

Beta testing - in *my* house

Tech support - maybe

Introduced to the market - Last week

Edited by CacheNCarryMA
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You know, there is a way to avoid all the teeth-cutting problems with the new Tritons, avoid the oft-stated customer service problems from Magellan, avoid the odometer-type problems with the HCx units, avoid the slow screen redraws with the PN-20, avoid the smallish installed base of the Lowrance and Bushnell units:

 

simply spend a little more money and buy a 60Cx or 76Cx. Skip the S versions since the compass and barometer add complexity without adding more functionality than what 3D gps provides anyway for most of us.

 

I have the 60Cx. It works. It simply works. For 2 years now my 60Cx has given me zero grief. Just search this forum. You don't see any complaints about the 60Cx or 76Cx. None.

 

You don't need to do any more research. Skip the frustration, buy a 60Cx or 76Cx, and be done with it. You'll be glad you did.

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You know, there is a way to avoid all the teeth-cutting problems with the new Tritons, avoid the oft-stated customer service problems from Magellan, avoid the odometer-type problems with the HCx units, avoid the slow screen redraws with the PN-20, avoid the smallish installed base of the Lowrance and Bushnell units:

 

simply spend a little more money and buy a 60Cx or 76Cx. Skip the S versions since the compass and barometer add complexity without adding more functionality than what 3D gps provides anyway for most of us.

 

I have the 60Cx. It works. It simply works. For 2 years now my 60Cx has given me zero grief. Just search this forum. You don't see any complaints about the 60Cx or 76Cx. None.

 

You don't need to do any more research. Skip the frustration, buy a 60Cx or 76Cx, and be done with it. You'll be glad you did.

 

I would agree with you, but you know if you need typographical information Garmin is absolutely awful.

I have the eTrex Vista and the Topo software and it is absolutely awful never take it with me hiking/ backpacking.

PN-20 replace my eXplorist 600 and it had firmware issues when it first came out as well.

I purchased the Onix 400 twice and returned it twice.

I purchased the Triton 2000 last of December and so far so good. Like the PN-20 it has the usual first-run bugs but for backpacking having both MapSend Topos and USGA QUADS (NG) on the same card is a godsend. Being much faster and a larger screen it will probably replace My PN-20. If only the 2000 would do satellite images then it would be the clear winner.

My Forerunner 201 and 305 were plagued with firmware bugs for the first year of their release. The 201 was a total failure unless you had clear skies (no trees etc) it was worthless even after all the patching. 305 is really great once I got past version 2.4.x

Now if Garmin had a decent Topo maps or did QUADS I would be first in line.

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Due to the Tritons not yet being available in Australia I bought one from the US. It arrived five days ago and has taken that amount of time to figure out all of it's features.

I have read a lot of posts about the unit being unreliable or hard to figure out. Most of this seems to be due to the instruction manual being too simplistic and incomplete and most expecting it to operate like all their past Magellans.

After the big learning curve with lots of fiddling and head scratching I have found the unit to be a good one and I must add that everything works. The unit will freeze on occasions, usually due to operator error and pushing it to do something that you shouldn't, but, hey, what computer doesn't on occasions?

Most of the features are a plus and once you get the hang of the format, easy to use.

The Vantage software is just brilliant and seems to contain anything that is needed.

Just remember that the OS is nothing like what you are probably used to and it will take some time to get it all together...... I wanted to chuck it to the sh..house on numerous occasions but now the Explorist 500 is second fiddle.

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Due to the Tritons not yet being available in Australia I bought one from the US. It arrived five days ago and has taken that amount of time to figure out all of it's features.

I have read a lot of posts about the unit being unreliable or hard to figure out. Most of this seems to be due to the instruction manual being too simplistic and incomplete and most expecting it to operate like all their past Magellans.

After the big learning curve with lots of fiddling and head scratching I have found the unit to be a good one and I must add that everything works. The unit will freeze on occasions, usually due to operator error and pushing it to do something that you shouldn't, but, hey, what computer doesn't on occasions?

Most of the features are a plus and once you get the hang of the format, easy to use.

The Vantage software is just brilliant and seems to contain anything that is needed.

Just remember that the OS is nothing like what you are probably used to and it will take some time to get it all together...... I wanted to chuck it to the sh..house on numerous occasions but now the Explorist 500 is second fiddle.

 

You're a more patient man than I. Which model is it? How many geocaches/waypoint have you loaded? Is there any noticeable lag time when switching nav screens?

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Well, here is my two cents after a couple weeks of testing the unit for geocaching and hiking here in Northern Cal.

 

While the promise of the feature set on this product had me ready to switch from my Garmin 60CSx, the implementation is horrible. Do not buy this unit until Magellan re-releases it correctly.

 

Areas of problem so far:

* Random crashes. Reminds me of WIN 98. It crashes often. Sorry, that is NOT acceptable on a computer nor on a $500 handheld!

* SLOW!!! It is especially slow when you switch to the map screen, the main one you use.

* No street maps

* "Nearest cache/waypoint" feature does not work. For some reason, it consistently points me to waypoints/caches at a park about 5 miles away as the closest even if I move around to different locations within the range. Can see waypoints nearby (across the street in one test), but it ignores them.

* Interface with PC is slow. Loaded my Garmin side by side with the Magellan. Garmin took about 10-15 seconds to load 900+ waypoints. Same load on the Magellan took ~2 minutes.

* Magellan on-line help is HORRIBLE! There support page does not even list the Tritons yet in many of the drop down lists. FAQ's are more marketing material then help.

 

I got a reply back on my post to their support email. It took them three days to respond.

 

* Issue: Triton is not listed on their support drop downs. Response: It is a new unit and they have not updated the web page. "Wait for some time until this unit gets updated" (Last I checked, that would be a one day job for a competent programmer.)

 

* Issue: "nearest" function not working on geocaches. Response: please call tech support regarding this issue. (Call to tech support number refers you back to the web page.)

 

* Message from tech support was obviously from someone who stuggles with writing English. Grammar errors and typos.

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You're a more patient man than I. Which model is it? How many geocaches/waypoint have you loaded? Is there any noticeable lag time when switching nav screens?

 

Not so much patient but persistent I guess. Triton 2000

I havent loaded that many maybe a dozen so far and probably never have loaded that many in the past and usually keep them down to only what I need in any one day so that I don't have to search or scroll around too much.

The lag doesn't seem to be consistant, sometimes it's fast, sometimes its slow but my Explorist 500 did the same on occasions.

 

Someone mentioned that its not acceptable for any computer to have problems..... thats what my wife says and she runs a MAC or has been for the last few years and pushes it real hard and she has never had ONE problem apart from the dog chewing the power cord.

Cant wait until MAC bring out a GPSr

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I anxiously awaited receiving my Triton 500. It arrived. I took it out of the box, sparked it up. Loaded the software, etc....... My computer wouldn't recognize the device. The GPSr froze up. Batteries out. Spark it up again. Moving from function to function or page to page was frustrating because it would hesitate for several seconds before it would respond.

 

Called customer service about the device recognition problem. After 30 minutes of me unplugging every device that used USB slot, and re-booting my computer several times, the nice, but difficult to understand customer service tech put me on hold............................. When he came back on, he conceded that this is a known problem; that the company is working on a solution; and that someone would contact me within 36 to 48 hours with a fix.

 

Unit went back in the box and returned to Cabela's. At the same time I ordered and received 24 hours later, a Garmin eTrex Vista HCx. It performed flawlessly out of the box. I used it yesterday on a Geocache mission with my grandson. We went 5 for 5.

 

Sorry Magellan. You need to have your product ready for market before you start sending it out. I have always been a Magellan Man. I'm now a Garmin Man.

 

Best wishes !

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