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Muggles


slateface
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Hello all, I know I'm new to the world of geocaching, but one thing bugs me...using Harry Potter terms for a game that is completely unrelated to sorcery and witchcraft. So I propose a new term to describe people uninitiated with the game. Since we are more like spies, I propose calling them citizens or civilians. Alternatively the is an old term for someone that doesn't know what's going on: they used to be called "Fish". In my logs and geocaches, I will be using one of these terms to describe what were called *shudder* "muggles".

I believe this game is unique enough to deserve its own lexicon.

Edited by slateface
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Hello all, I know I'm new to the world of geocaching, but one thing bugs me...using Harry Potter terms for a game that is completely unrelated to sorcery and witchcraft. So I propose a new term to describe people uninitiated with the game. Since we are more like spies, I propose calling them citizens or civilians. Alternatively the is an old term for someone that doesn't know what's going on: they used to be called "Fish". In my logs and geocaches, I will be using one of these terms to describe what were called *shudder* "muggles".

I believe this game is unique enough to deserve its own lexicon.

 

Muggle was the right term at the right time and it is part of the lexicon.

When the term was taken and used in the Harry Potter series it already had a slang meaning that had nothing to do with how it was used in the book.

 

When you fly in the face of convention you risk being not understood. You can call them fish, that's your perogative. However I'll have no clue what the heck you are talking about.

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Hello all, I know I'm new to the world of geocaching, but one thing bugs me...using Harry Potter terms for a game that is completely unrelated to sorcery and witchcraft. So I propose a new term to describe people uninitiated with the game. Since we are more like spies, I propose calling them citizens or civilians. Alternatively the is an old term for someone that doesn't know what's going on: they used to be called "Fish". In my logs and geocaches, I will be using one of these terms to describe what were called *shudder* "muggles".

I believe this game is unique enough to deserve its own lexicon.

Way worse things in the World to get in a fuss over. If you don't like the term, just don't use it. Expecting everybody else who has used the word muggle to change simply because you personally don't like it is not very likely to happen is it? :grin:

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Alternatively the is an old term for someone that doesn't know what's going on: they used to be called "Fish".

 

"Fish" is usually an inexperienced player (chess, cards, whatever) or the new guy. Geocaching has pretty much stolen the word "muggle" and made it our own. Looking back though forum posts and cache logs, it's been around since year one.

I like to think of geocachers as the Illuminati, but I haven't thought of a good antonym. Ignoranti is fitting, but seems a bit harsh. Muggles. Muggles works.

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In my logs I regularly refer to a non-geocacher who is exercising his pet near ground zero as a "muggle with a doggle." Do not deny me that poetic phrase.

 

GeoDogs are so much cooler than Doggles. A GeoDog gets all excited when there's an ammo box to sniff out. But one time, we came across a Doggle who really should have been a GeoDog. We were 50 feet off the trail, just beginning our search for a cache, when a Doggle bolted from his owner, ran into the woods, and went right to the cache. Link to Loggle.

 

The only things I don't like are the term "mugglers" (if you're going to steal a word, steal it accurately) and saying that a cache or geocoin was "muggled" when it's obvious that a geocacher, not a muggle, was responsible for its disappearance.

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Muggle - Comes from English slang. A "mug" is somebody who is easily fooled.

 

Cult - Adherents of an exclusive system of religious beliefs and practices

 

For the Record:

The author nor her "followers" belong to any cult organized by the author. I enjoyed reading the books - that does not make me a member or believer of any of the events portrayed. I have this ability to read about made-up things and understand that they are made-up and not real. I don't think I'm the only one...

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Yes, let's get rid of "muggle" and begin using a much easier term. One that rolls off the tongue. A term like "snibblegrats" or "hoobywarttles" or "zynquardian jeeblestanks".

 

Surely any of these would make a lot more sense in the context of geocaching.

 

If you don't like "muggle" then use something else. No one says you can't call them something else.

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I don't like the term geocaches, so I call them all auaoaia's.

 

The problem with lexicons is that once a term is in general use, it's hard to sway momentum away from it....you don't have to use the term, but others may not have a clue what you're talking about if you don't.

 

And my kids LOVED the term muggles when we started auaoaiaing. It was something easy for both of them to understand and giggle about as we were out searching....I think the term fits quite well for our hobby.

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The only things I don't like are the term "mugglers" (if you're going to steal a word, steal it accurately) and saying that a cache or geocoin was "muggled" when it's obvious that a geocacher, not a muggle, was responsible for its disappearance.

That always bothers me too. There's no "R" in the word muggle.
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Hmm... I think I'll call them Flarkelzorts....

 

No really - I don't understand the resistance to the word Muggle... So what if it comes from a fantasy book?

 

Besides, it fits so well, I cannot think of anything better... Fish certainly doesnt convey the same meaning.

 

But, I will call them muggles who can muggle caches... you can call them fish, who... swim(?) caches? Or whatever else you like.

 

Nobody says you HAVE to call them muggles in much the same way nobody says you HAVE to call a chair a chair... I can call a chair a Migorkle if I want to since language is just a social construct. But if I want people to understand what I am talking about, I have to play by the rules of whatever society I am in at the time - AKA, speak their language. So I call a chair a chair... :(

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The only things I don't like are the term "mugglers" (if you're going to steal a word, steal it accurately) and saying that a cache or geocoin was "muggled" when it's obvious that a geocacher, not a muggle, was responsible for its disappearance.

 

I'm not sure, but I think the muggled term applies more to a cache that has been vandalized, trashed, thown about the area, etc... Another cacher (hopefully!) would never do that, but some muggle kids certainly would.

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Hmm... I think I'll call them Flarkelzorts....

 

No really - I don't understand the resistance to the word Muggle... So what if it comes from a fantasy book?

 

Besides, it fits so well, I cannot think of anything better...

 

 

What do you MEAN you cant think of anything better?!?!?!? You just DID.

 

"Flarkelzorts"!!!

 

This term, along with some other nifty ideas posted here over the last day may have provided me with a new vocabulary from you - the self-declaimed "unworthy" folks who have actually thrown out some gems in this very post.

 

I will be using "civilians" . . . and on occasion, most certainly, flarkelzort.

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The only things I don't like are the term "mugglers" (if you're going to steal a word, steal it accurately) and saying that a cache or geocoin was "muggled" when it's obvious that a geocacher, not a muggle, was responsible for its disappearance.

 

From what I read on another thread, the "r" is added in Sweden to mean more than one (if my memory's right, it's Sweden). Maybe that is what you are seeing it used for?

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Nor do I believe in unicorns.

Awww man, you mean they aren't real?? :laughing:

 

I think the term muggle is very appropriate. One of the cool things about geocaching is the general population has absolutely no idea what your up to, nor do they have any idea of all the cool places there are to hide things right under their noses! If you've ever read the Harry Potter books (which I don't object if you haven't), it's kind of the same way that the Muggles don't sense or see the magical folk/magic in the story that surround them. Again, it is just a story, like geocaching is just a game. Oh wait, it's not just a game... :mad:

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One could make the same complaint about Christmas trees. I could say that they're pagan and don't belong in a Christian holiday. The fact is that like the word "muggle" they were adapted from something I don't happen to agree with, but I very much enjoy their use and would not part with them. It is the latter use that wins out over the former. If you really don't like Harry Potter, then advocate the use of the word muggle until it becomes primarily a geocaching word, and its witchcraft connotation dies from lack of use.

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In my logs I regularly refer to a non-geocacher who is exercising his pet near ground zero as a "muggle with a doggle." Do not deny me that poetic phrase.

To juggle the muggle is always a struggle.

To goggle your mug’ll just cause 'em to boggle!

 

You’ll haggle and wriggle to 'splain why you smuggle;

'twill rankle their wrinkle and giggle their doggle.

 

A fickle small dog'll bedraggle your ankle;

(Go Google "bedraggle," 'twill cause you to giggle!)

 

A muggle who’s quick'll see right through your haggle,

Your huckle and buckle won’t be worth a nickel.

 

Don't brickle or pickle or cause a boondoggle;

Just juggle the smuggle – hornswoggle that muggle!

Edited by KBI
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In my logs I regularly refer to a non-geocacher who is exercising his pet near ground zero as a "muggle with a doggle." Do not deny me that poetic phrase.

To juggle the muggle is always a struggle.

To goggle your mug’ll just cause 'em to boggle!

 

You’ll haggle and wriggle to 'splain why you smuggle;

'twill rankle their wrinkle and giggle their doggle.

 

A fickle small dog'll bedraggle your ankle;

(Go Google "bedraggle," 'twill cause you to giggle!)

 

A muggle who’s quick'll see right through your haggle,

Your huckle and buckle won’t be worth a nickel.

 

Don't brickle or pickle or cause a boondoggle;

Just juggle the smuggle – hornswoggle that muggle!

 

:laughing::mad::mad: That's great!!! :D:D:D

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My word for muggles: "Anyone".

 

At a cache site, I'll ask my son, "Loco, do you see 'anyone'?" He knows exactly what I mean. I don't go out of my way to say, "Loco, be on the lookout for muggles." I'm sorry, but IMHO, the word "muggle" is a little cheesy. However cheesy, it stuck. Good luck trying to change everyone's mind if you do find the coolest word for the "anyones".

Edited by meralgia
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I have to drop my 2 cents in on this one (sound of 2 pennies falling into an empty jar)

 

The term wasn't meant to incur the wrath of people who, sorry to say, are pretty well muggles in themselves.

 

The term used here, fits the term used in the Harry Potter books, because of one key, common definition..

 

They Don't believe!

 

my own personal definition:

 

Those who would prevent, restrict, with-hold, blockade.

Deliberately stop, scold, damage, sabotage, destroy.

 

Just because someone's belief goes against another's, shouldn't allow the disbeliever the right to do any

of the above mentioned (my definition) to the believer. but, it's also in their right of free will.

 

Lookup Hierophant. On my MySpace page, I put the result of a quiz, "Which Tarot Card are You?".

Just because I don't believe strongly in tarot, doesn't mean it has no meaning to anyone else.

But, the result, fit me to a "T". a teacher of the ways between the life now, and the life after, a "Crazy Saint", or "Holy Fool". A traditionalist, and a helper.

 

a good lesson is learned from one webpage I found, http://www.gaiantarot.com/majors/hierophant.html

 

look at the last few paragraphs. while trying to learn one thing, you end up learning another.

 

We're using GPS's to find hidden treasure. while learning how to use the GPS, we learn tracking, orientation, navigation.

 

While out in the field, we learn (totally by doing) forensics. (seeing things out of the ordinary, hidden clues, odd items where they shouldn't be, but are.) we gain knowledge by what others did to find the same item.

 

Yipes! the hierophant in me coming out.. :anitongue:

 

Stephen (gelfling6)

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Personally, I do find "muggle" a bit embarrassing. Especially when talking to a muggle about geocaching.

 

I kinda like the term "enemy", myself. Anybody with me on that one?

 

Ummm, talking to a muggle is embarassing because we use that term, and you think they'd like "enemy" better???

Edited by geowizerd
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Personally, I do find "muggle" a bit embarrassing. Especially when talking to a muggle about geocaching.

 

I kinda like the term "enemy", myself. Anybody with me on that one?

 

Ummm, talking to a muggle is embarassing because we use that term, and you think they'd like "enemy" better???

 

You should see their reactions when I call them Flarkelzorts... :anitongue:

 

Seriously though, when using the term muggles while talking to muggles, it works because they instantly know the meaning behind it.

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Personally, I do find "muggle" a bit embarrassing. Especially when talking to a muggle about geocaching.

 

I kinda like the term "enemy", myself. Anybody with me on that one?

 

Ummm, talking to a muggle is embarassing because we use that term, and you think they'd like "enemy" better???

They are only muggles when they are near a cache and then only when we know they are there.

 

When I work with themy they are co workers when I have a beer with them they are friends. I don't hire a muggle to babysit my kids, I hire a babysitter. The babysitter may or may not be a cacher. If the person has a staple in their stomache they are a centerfold.

 

Some people make muggle more complex than it is.

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This term is a mistake. It really doesn't help. Surely we want to (to some extent) promote the fun to be had geocaching... but using an ultrageek/ meganerd term like this makes it hard to sell!

 

Yes I know I'm new to the boards, but please don't be offended by my opinion :)

Edited by ORAMA
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