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Energy Bars


Jedi Cacher
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Years ago there really were not a whole lot of choices for energy bars out there. I used to chow down on power bars but made the switch a few years ago. I really love Clif Bars and they have allot of flavors to choose from. My personal favorite is the Chocolate Chip Peanut Crunch and the Chocolate Almond Fudge for second choice. They even make a kid friendly Zbar that my son and his cub scout pack loves. They also make Electrolyte drinks that can be served hot or cold, but have not tried them out yet. Might have to try the cider electrolyte or hot chocolate recovery beverage when out on the slopes this winter. :(

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Assuming this is a "light" hike, less than eight hours, energy bars may be okay as a quick fix.

 

Problem with these is climate...

Summer, they become a molten bag of goo, unless alongside a cool water bladder in a hydro pack (water doesn't stay "cool" for long .)

Winter, they'll break your teeth like a year old MaryJane.

 

One we've found seems to last a bit longer in both climes is ACCESS, made by Metaleuca. We like the double fudge best.

 

I'm still a bit happier with a cheese wedge and pepperoni.

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Years ago there really were not a whole lot of choices for energy bars out there. I used to chow down on power bars but made the switch a few years ago. I really love Clif Bars and they have allot of flavors to choose from. My personal favorite is the Chocolate Chip Peanut Crunch and the Chocolate Almond Fudge for second choice. They even make a kid friendly Zbar that my son and his cub scout pack loves. They also make Electrolyte drinks that can be served hot or cold, but have not tried them out yet. Might have to try the cider electrolyte or hot chocolate recovery beverage when out on the slopes this winter. :huh:

 

I tend to gravitate toward Luna bars if I want something that can be found almost anywhere - I tend to stay away from chocolate (most of the time!!) and like the Iced Oatmeal Raisin and Peanut Butter Cookie flavors. They are diary free (trace amts may be present), which is a must for me.

 

When I'm more on the ball and have planned ahead, I REALLY like larabar's 'cashew cookie', 'key lime pie' and 'cherry pie'. They're raw and vegan. They hold up VERY well and I'd have to venture a guess that eating them might take most people some getting used to.

 

Neither of these are meal-skip-worthy... but a quick punch if my blood sugar is heading down into 'that' range and it might be a little while before I can get to a spot to eat something more substantial.

 

 

michelle

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I tried energy bars of several types and find they require too much water to digest easily. I tend to go after the Clif Shot Blocks. They come six blocks to a package, and you take 2 per hour with a couple swallows of water to help the digestion process. They chew like gummie bears and come in several flavors although I recommend against the margarita flavor.

Edited by TotemLake
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I agree with the Lara bar recommendation. They are just fruit and nuts, so they seem handle most temperatures pretty well and are pretty easily digestible for me. They are definitely a snack, but seem to perk me up pretty well when I need it. Luna bars are second choice. Third choice, probably just some mixed nuts. I thought I read somewhere once that a peanut butter and jelly sandwich was pretty much as good as most energy bars - no guarantee of the accuracy of that, though

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I agree with the Lara bar recommendation. They are just fruit and nuts, so they seem handle most temperatures pretty well and are pretty easily digestible for me. They are definitely a snack, but seem to perk me up pretty well when I need it. Luna bars are second choice. Third choice, probably just some mixed nuts. I thought I read somewhere once that a peanut butter and jelly sandwich was pretty much as good as most energy bars - no guarantee of the accuracy of that, though

 

And then you set the PB&J up against something hard in your pack and it gets this mushy spot... right where it sat up against something hard in your pack. Ew. Mushy PB&J! With the shape of a... what was that, anyway? ... right in the middle!

 

 

:huh:

 

I don't take energy bars with me when I hike - I agree with a previous poster in that it's just as easy to pack something more nutritious and longer lasting - but I TRY to take one with me every day so when my stomach starts to grumble between 10 and 12 I have something to keep me noise-free for the rest of the time I'm a captive audience.

 

 

michelle

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Started out using Power Bars, but they get mushy in hot weather and solid in cold weather, and they taste funny. Switched to cliff bars and am a big fan of the cool mint chocolate. Just sweet enough without being over powering. They are nice pick me up when I need it.

Edited by magellan315
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And then you set the PB&J up against something hard in your pack and it gets this mushy spot... right where it sat up against something hard in your pack. Ew. Mushy PB&J! With the shape of a... what was that, anyway? ... right in the middle!

 

michelle

 

Hey, those lock-n-locks can be used for more than just cache containers :blink:

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My wife is a big fan of Lara bars.

 

I've tried the Clif bars and like the peanut toffee buzz and the peanut butter ones. Snickers Marathon in Chewy Peanut Butter was OK. Power Bars are OK in some flavors but I'm afraid I'm going to lose a filling eating one of those.

 

I have a couple in my pack for emergencies, but generally don't eat them because they don't fill me up. I'd have to eat about 4 of the things for lunch.

 

My typical backpacking lunch is a spicy, dried sausage (chorizo, pepperoni, hot sopprasata, etc...) and cheddar on Triscuts, or canned tuna on Triscuts. If it's just a day hike I bring a sandwich, and maybe some soup or chili in a Thermos if it's cold out.

 

I make my own gorp for a quick, pick me up snack on the trail. Usually raisins, peanuts, sesame sticks, dried banana chips, M&Ms and cashews.

Edited by briansnat
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And then you set the PB&J up against something hard in your pack and it gets this mushy spot... right where it sat up against something hard in your pack. Ew. Mushy PB&J! With the shape of a... what was that, anyway? ... right in the middle!

 

michelle

 

Hey, those lock-n-locks can be used for more than just cache containers :D

 

:laughing: Well, one of uses the tupperware container method of sandwich carrying and the other kind of likes the randomly smashed PBJ sandwich effect. There's no accounting for taste, I guess. My personal favorite trail lunch is a salami and havarti sandwich on whole grain bread. Mmmm. Yes, I am the tupperware carrier.

 

The Lara bars are our convenience trail food. We can buy them in bulk at the Costco here, so we usually have some on hand to throw in the pack on the way out the door.

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Not sure if there is a benefit to carrying the bars since they require so much water for digestion. For day hikes I prefer to carry a banana, apples, and if it is going to be really strenuous, and I will need a lot of extra sugar, perhaps a small pack of raisins or other dried fruit.

 

A little milk chocolate is also always in my pack for long hikes (wrapped in a paper towel and a plastic ziplock bag).

Edited by hwyhobo
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That's actually one of the benefits IMO - they make you keep drinking to stay hydrated.

Doesn't compute. Bars force you to drink to replenish what should have been there in the first place. That is not a plus outcome, that is a zero outcome. Unless you mean you wouldn't drink otherwise? <_<

Edited by hwyhobo
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Clif bars are may favorites.

 

I'm curious SWV, what are your favorites the other 11 months? :P

 

I normally go the roni-roll trailmix route too. Haven't found an energy bar I really like but this thread has at least given me some choices to try.

 

Usually energy bars for the warm weather months. Even if they melt a bit, they still stay in their package well enough for me to squeeze them out. I generally drink enough water to help them go down well. They're also good whether I'm doing some hiking, backpacking, or on my bike.

 

I tend to do the roni-roll/trail mix from fall through spring.

 

:P

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That's actually one of the benefits IMO - they make you keep drinking to stay hydrated.

Doesn't compute. Bars force you to drink to replenish what should have been there in the first place. That is not a plus outcome, that is a zero outcome. Unless you mean you wouldn't drink otherwise? :laughing:

 

That would be me. I am horrible about remembering to drink, so the shots get me drink probably to the point I should have been all along.

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That's actually one of the benefits IMO - they make you keep drinking to stay hydrated.

Doesn't compute. Bars force you to drink to replenish what should have been there in the first place. That is not a plus outcome, that is a zero outcome. Unless you mean you wouldn't drink otherwise? :)

 

Sorry for the late reply. You are correct - they force you to drink. For me it's not an issue, I drink plenty (just did a 13 mile 5,000-foot climb hike a few days ago and took a full 4-liters of water with me. But a lot of people don't remember to drink enough and energy bars, trail mix, etc. tend to make people thirsty, resulting in them drinking. That was my point.

 

I like the idea of adding little peperoni rolls into trail mix - sounds good!

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ya just can't beat the old original Power Bar, for being able to wad the whole thing up and stickin' it down the pie hole in one piece.

gotta chew onit like a Gurnsey chewin' her cud, takes a minit or two ta get it real good and soft then ya can get a swig of water, get it kinda liquified 'n' swallow it!

it takes me longer to type it than ta do it.

these thing weren't made for the gourmet types, just for that quick energy burst to make it to that favorite camp. right?

Edited by dagger dog
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I feel like such a old crank -- couple of granola bars, an apple or two, and a couple liters of water (hot cocoa or coffe in a thermos in winter), maybe a PB and J, and I am good to go for a good solid day hike.

 

Frankly, the power bars are more sugar than my body can handle (they seem like oversized Bit O' Honeys that don't taste as good) and the cheese and salami/pepperoni is way more fat and salt than I need. In either case, they don't agree with my stomach too well, and leave me thirsty.

 

Except in winter/hypothermia weather, calorie deficit isn't often a real issue. Keeping hydrated is usually a bigger deal. Besides, here in Wisconsin, I don't see too many folks on the trails who look like they have missed meals (myself included!)

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