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Equipment North East--Hiking Equipment


Packanack
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Last winter we muckied a thread with crampon discussions. I have spent months searching for a crampon style that would fit the Northern New Jersey Winter hiking conditons--and I found a product that is due for release in the next couple of weeks and it looks like exactly what I was looking for. I spotted and add in Backpacker Magazine--and I also found that Campmor does not have them Then I learned that they are due for release shortly. I really did not like stabilicers for hiking.

 

http://thegearjunkie.com/kahtoola-microspikes.

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Not sure that the super-soft rubber would hold up in our area with many rocks. (You've got the same :unsure:

We tried others similier and they'd just get torn to shreds. Seems that anything that stretches to fit are'nt tough enough and gonna crap out on us too early.

If you're gonna "product test" these, let us know how they turn out.

We seem to have luck with our "corkers" that we use for salmon/steelheading. A little heavy, they hold up forever and hex-head screws are easily replaceable.

Since we don't mountain climb , where we'd need to have added front-points, I'm considering a pair of six-point Stubai crampons.

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I used the Kahtoola 10 point crampon type all of last winter and found them to be excellent. I could hike and hardly noticed that they were on. They can be used with anything from running shoes to hiking boots. The aluminum model is lighter, but the steel are significantly better in heavy ice conditions, will hold up much better in the long run and require less sharpening.

 

7de6e06b-cdfb-487f-8772-962544cc5377.jpg

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I have a pair of these which I find to work quite well. Last winter, my cousin (who destroyed a set of Yacktrax in about 10 minutes) and I went into Black Rock Forest, and we had to share my pair. I used the left foot, and he used the right foot. Otherwise, the hiking would not have occured. Believe it or not, this system worked well (not that I would recommend it!).

 

And they are pretty cheap.

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They are cheaper than the Kahtoolas, which will retail at 58 dollars American. Ramsey Outdoor store does not carry the brand.

 

So tell me, did you and your cousing strap your non cramponed leg together ? 3 legged race style.

 

And we have been looking for your reappearance at one of our Sunrise Hikes. We all wondered what we did to offend you. ;)

Edited by Packanack
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:laughing:-->

QUOTE(brian b @ Oct 16 2007, 02:03 PM) 3116462[/snapback]

I have a pair of these which I find to work quite well. Last winter, my cousin (who destroyed a set of Yacktrax in about 10 minutes) and I went into Black Rock Forest, and we had to share my pair. I used the left foot, and he used the right foot. Otherwise, the hiking would not have occured. Believe it or not, this system worked well (not that I would recommend it!).

 

And they are pretty cheap.

 

Exact same ones that Skigirl and I use. They work well in most conditions you will find around here. If you are on serious steeps though you probably want 10 point crampons with toe cleats.

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They are cheaper than the Kahtoolas, which will retail at 58 dollars American. Ramsey Outdoor store does not carry the brand.

 

So tell me, did you and your cousing strap your non cramponed leg together ? 3 legged race style.

 

And we have been looking for your reappearance at one of our Sunrise Hikes. We all wondered what we did to offend you. :laughing:

 

We were trying to traverse 100 yards (and more at times) of ice covered trails; I chose not to use the crampons at first, since it would be truly unfair for me to have an advantage over his equipment deficiency (no joking, please!). But we spent more time on our arses than we did standing.

 

So we just hopped along. It was quite comical.

 

As for the Sunrise Hikes, I thoroughly enjoyed my mornign adventure/hike; I am a morning person, but my wife is not. Which means that I get to allow her to sleep in on the weekends and while I tend to the children. But maybe I will get around to finding my way to another gathering before too long.

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I've suggested it before (since I bought mine there, too) and just checked again... ebay has 24 pairs of various full size crampons listed for sale under the $50 mark and a few of those are "Buy It Now" prices. Get'm now before the ugly weather sets in and they're much more expensive! ;)

 

Once you use a pair of 10 or 12 points, you'll probably be sold for life on the idea. There's nothing quite as cool as jogging up a trail slicked over with ice while people to left and right are laboring through the drifts on either side looking for any kind of traction they can find :huh:

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Thought about buying crampons after learning that Yak traks don't hold up well in wilderness hiking.My one concern is them getting stuck in the ice or frozen dirt and my forward motion ripping my knee apart.Anyone have any problems with this?

I've never noticed anything even close to what you're asking about. The natural grip is enough so that there's no slippage, but unless you really jam them down they don't go into ice, or even frozen ground, all that deep. BTW... the aluminum ones have 3/4" long teeth which are slightly thicker than the 1" teeth on the steel version. The steel will definitely dig into ice better and they also have a more aggressive angle on the front teeth. I've found that the aluminum pair have a slightly more natural feel than the steel, probaby due to the slight difference in design.

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Thought about buying crampons after learning that Yak traks don't hold up well in wilderness hiking.My one concern is them getting stuck in the ice or frozen dirt and my forward motion ripping my knee apart.Anyone have any problems with this?

 

The only problem I've had is if it's a bit warm the snow tends to accumulate between the cleats. Very annoying. Never had a problem with them getting stuck though.

 

One issue with the 6 point crampons on steeps is that you tend to put your weight on your toes when climbing, but the cleats are on your heel. I almost took a serious tumble down an icy, rocky slope because of this.

 

If you are doing a lot of steeps definitely get 10 point crampons, or be veeeery careful.

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Thought about buying crampons after learning that Yak traks don't hold up well in wilderness hiking.My one concern is them getting stuck in the ice or frozen dirt and my forward motion ripping my knee apart.Anyone have any problems with this?

 

The only problem I've had is if it's a bit warm the snow tends to accumulate between the cleats. Very annoying. Never had a problem with them getting stuck though.

 

One issue with the 6 point crampons on steeps is that you tend to put your weight on your toes when climbing, but the cleats are on your heel. I almost took a serious tumble down an icy, rocky slope because of this.

 

If you are doing a lot of steeps definitely get 10 point crampons, or be veeeery careful.

Is that what you used in that Youtube video? I noticed Skigirl progressed up that icy hill without much trouble. You do have to stick to the ice or snow right? I mean you can't grind across the rocks with them on can you?

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In the way of equipment: Those looking for light weight but warm (very warm ) gloves for hiking and other things: Serius Gloves at Berkshire Factory Outlet Stor, off of Riverview Drive in Wayne, a little pricey at 24.00, Columbia at same location. Pearl Izumi winter bicycling gloves or Swix Gloves at Campmor, very comfortable but can be 2X that, I bought seconds for a lesser price. Similar gloves at Kohl's for $10.00.

 

These are thin gloves that make it easy to grip hiking sticks, adjust straps and even use GPS, but the Hi Tech fabric makes them really suitable for many uses.

 

NEW HIKING BOOK FOR LOCAL HIKERS

Featured in the Record today in the Better Living section. Title: West Milford Baker's Dozen: A Hikers Guide to Climbing the Heart of the Highlands 13 Greatest Peaks.

 

Author Don Weise --cost $10.00 plus shipping and handling.

Link for story:

http://northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpc...2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3

 

 

Contact author at donweise@hotmail.com

 

I have e mailed for my copy but my e mail indicated a problem with the email address provided.

 

Sounded fairly interesting, I suspect most of us have done most of these if we have done some BrianSnat caches

Edited by Packanack
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Equipment Questions for Northeast.

 

Ok-Question Do you snowshoe?

 

Snow in forecast, do you snowshoe and at what depth do they become worthwhile ?

 

Do you posthole and at what depth do you stop ?

 

Do you stop hiking wintertime due to snow ?

 

Recommendations for snow hiking ?

 

It has been years since I last snowshoed and was thinking .........

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Yes, I do snowshoe. I only wish I did it more often. Because of the areas I snowshoe in tend to have some underbrush that get caught in my shoes I only go out with a good 8" or so of covering.

 

I like to hike all year around. Real life ends to keep me from doing it.

 

While I do wear gaiters I hate post holing above 4" or so of snow. To me it sucks too much energy out of me.

 

Recommendations? Do it! Start small and see how much you can safely do in a time period. While I have hike 19 miles in one day with a full back, snowshoeing 5 miles with a full back pretty much kills me.

 

Equipment Questions for Northeast.

 

Ok-Question Do you snowshoe?

 

Snow in forecast, do you snowshoe and at what depth do they become worthwhile ?

 

Do you posthole and at what depth do you stop ?

 

Do you stop hiking wintertime due to snow ?

 

Recommendations for snow hiking ?

 

It has been years since I last snowshoed and was thinking .........

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Equipment Questions for Northeast.

 

Ok-Question Do you snowshoe?

Yes, as often as possible. I switched to MSR Lightning Ascents when I moved to my present location... in snow country. It's snowing right now!

 

Snow in forecast, do you snowshoe and at what depth do they become worthwhile ?

Yes. Over 10" before donning the shoes.

 

Do you posthole and at what depth do you stop ?

Without snowshoes often up to crotch level. With snowshoes seldom to knee level.

 

Do you stop hiking wintertime due to snow ?

Not yet.

 

Recommendations for snow hiking ?

Besides a good gripping set of snowshoes, such as the MSR's, get a good set of snow gaiters. Right now I'm using Black Diamond GTX Frontpoint gaiters. I almost always take along the Kahtoola crampons since conditions change so often. Poles with snow baskets are a given.

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Maybe I'm dating myself, but I thought "post holeing" refered to suddenly being caught SINKING in deep, powdered snow. Where you kinda twist-stretch to try to get back on "top".

Haven't snowshoed since the 70's in Germany.

 

Two years ago, CJ and I cached in Wallenpaupack. Left the hard-packed parking lot and hit (dropped into, actually :D powdered snow up to our waists. Shocked at first, had a ball, but got soaked big time !

 

My question... Does it matter whether you have snoeshoes on or not with snow that deep ?

 

I hit the AT a lot in Winter. Seems the large footprint from my Sorel pac boots kinda do the same thing (?).

 

Was looking at MSR Denalis', but it appeared that I'd have to have more "room" on the trail to comfortably move . Also would have to go to a "normal" sized boot for the bindings (lose the comfort of the pacs).

 

Wide trails look like it could be fun, but narrow, single-track - snowshoes okay ?

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I mentioned this book in this thread a little while ago, the book is in and I received this E Mail

 

There are many Geocaches on the West Milford 13 , and I think there are only a few that I haven't done

 

 

Despite the snowstorm, the Baker's Dozen books are due in tomorrow afternoon and will be shipped ASAP. Thanks for your patience. I promised to get back to hikers regarding our next hike: we will have an organized hike (advanced level, fast paced) on Sunday, December 23, 9:30am at Long Pond Ironworks parking lot on Rt. 511. Please note that:

 

* Cardiovascular fitness is REQUIRED

* Donation is $8

* Do as many or as few peaks as you wish with the group, we will try to climb three

* All peaks you climb now count toward both your Winter 17 Challenge and your West Milford 13ers' Baker's Dozen Challenge requirements

* Cardiovascular fitness is required. Our pace is brisk and the terrain will be slick and steep

 

So mark your calendar for Sunday, December 23 and meet us at Long Pond Ironworks. Thanks.

 

Don Weise

Keep not standing, fixed and rooted, Briskly venture, briskly roam. ~Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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Equipment Questions for Northeast.

 

Ok-Question Do you snowshoe?

 

Snow in forecast, do you snowshoe and at what depth do they become worthwhile ?

 

Do you posthole and at what depth do you stop ?

 

Do you stop hiking wintertime due to snow ?

 

Recommendations for snow hiking ?

 

It has been years since I last snowshoed and was thinking .........

 

Absolutely! The depth changes constantly around us so a must have for snowshoe caching is MSR's (EMS?)showshoe pack (or any brand really). It's just like a regular small pack (schoolbook type) but between your shoulder straps and pack is an adjustable depth pouch that holds your snowshoes. It's lined with a super-durable rubber coating to protect itself from the snowshoe-crampons and very comfortable. I usually just throw my swagbag right into the pack part and leave my shoes in the pouch year round. That way I can throw them both in the trunk and just grab the shoes when I need them.

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Last winter we muckied a thread with crampon discussions. I have spent months searching for a crampon style that would fit the Northern New Jersey Winter hiking conditons--and I found a product that is due for release in the next couple of weeks and it looks like exactly what I was looking for. I spotted and add in Backpacker Magazine--and I also found that Campmor does not have them Then I learned that they are due for release shortly. I really did not like stabilicers for hiking.

 

http://thegearjunkie.com/kahtoola-microspikes.

There was a review on these in the most recent NYNJTC trail walker newsletter. (trailwalker-go to page 11) The author (a trail conference staff member) who normally uses crampons, tried these out in the Adirondack high peaks and loved them. I think I will probably order a pair and check them out. I have been using the stabilicers in NJ with no problem, even on ice (but not crazy steep ice), but I certainly wouldn't use them in the 'dacks. Were planning a catskills trip in a few weeks, so I'll probably try them out there since the catskills are a little more forgiving than the 'dacks :unsure: The only thing I'm not sure about is what size to get as I am between two sizes. The stabilicers I have are pretty similar design as they stretch over the boot and they actually seem a little too small. The sizes for the micro spikes say they are based on running and hiking SHOES, but a hiking BOOT is significantly larger, so I'm debating going with the larger size. Has anyone tried these yet and does anyone have sizing advice? Edited by trowel32
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Hi and thanks for your interest in the West Milford Baker's Dozen book which contains 13 official and four unofficial peaks, 17 total. Several are trailless peaks, perfect for geocaching. I recommend Jennings, Flagpole Vista, Boulder Pine Peak...you already have one on Long Hill. Not sure if there's anything on Dunker, South Kanouse, Buckabear or Apshawa Mtns...yet. There should be no problem with the donweise@hotmail.com address, but if that doesn't work, use weishiker@yahoo.com

 

In the way of equipment: Those looking for light weight but warm (very warm ) gloves for hiking and other things: Serius Gloves at Berkshire Factory Outlet Stor, off of Riverview Drive in Wayne, a little pricey at 24.00, Columbia at same location. Pearl Izumi winter bicycling gloves or Swix Gloves at Campmor, very comfortable but can be 2X that, I bought seconds for a lesser price. Similar gloves at Kohl's for $10.00.

 

These are thin gloves that make it easy to grip hiking sticks, adjust straps and even use GPS, but the Hi Tech fabric makes them really suitable for many uses.

 

NEW HIKING BOOK FOR LOCAL HIKERS

Featured in the Record today in the Better Living section. Title: West Milford Baker's Dozen: A Hikers Guide to Climbing the Heart of the Highlands 13 Greatest Peaks.

 

Author Don Weise --cost $10.00 plus shipping and handling.

Link for story:

http://northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpc...2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3

 

 

Contact author at donweise@hotmail.com

 

I have e mailed for my copy but my e mail indicated a problem with the email address provided.

 

Sounded fairly interesting, I suspect most of us have done most of these if we have done some BrianSnat caches

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Note there are 17 peaks if you count the unofficial peaks...those four are ones you want to focus on... :lol:

Don

 

I mentioned this book in this thread a little while ago, the book is in and I received this E Mail

 

There are many Geocaches on the West Milford 13 , and I think there are only a few that I haven't done

 

 

Despite the snowstorm, the Baker's Dozen books are due in tomorrow afternoon and will be shipped ASAP. Thanks for your patience. I promised to get back to hikers regarding our next hike: we will have an organized hike (advanced level, fast paced) on Sunday, December 23, 9:30am at Long Pond Ironworks parking lot on Rt. 511. Please note that:

 

* Cardiovascular fitness is REQUIRED

* Donation is $8

* Do as many or as few peaks as you wish with the group, we will try to climb three

* All peaks you climb now count toward both your Winter 17 Challenge and your West Milford 13ers' Baker's Dozen Challenge requirements

* Cardiovascular fitness is required. Our pace is brisk and the terrain will be slick and steep

 

So mark your calendar for Sunday, December 23 and meet us at Long Pond Ironworks. Thanks.

 

Don Weise

Keep not standing, fixed and rooted, Briskly venture, briskly roam. ~Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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A couple of the people who are regulars on the Sunrise Stepoffs have ordered this book , or have expressed interest in the book. I believe that just about every point in the book has a cache, or a nearby cache.

Recently , I went to Assiniwikam Mountain, I did not find the caches, but I was rewarded with a wonderful hike and great views, so I highly recommend exploring these areas.

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I probably have bagged most of the peaks without knowing it.--You have.

 

Many of the high peaks of West Milford have your caches on them, a couple come to mind,

Centurion, Buck Mtn, Terrace Pond, Beech Mtn. Your Bearfort Caches are among them.

 

Kanouse is the Old Glory, Cache. Jeremy Glick's Overlooks is the Covert 002 area

 

When I bought the book I found that I had done 9 of the 13, have since done 2 more, Apshawa and Assikiniwikam I have a cache on one of the unofficials, which is a rarely visited cache overlooking Bearfort Waters, but for any Hiking Book or equipment groupie it is well worth the price. Each area offers vistas that are worth the walk.

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I probably have bagged most of the peaks without knowing it.--You have.

 

Many of the high peaks of West Milford have your caches on them, a couple come to mind,

Centurion, Buck Mtn, Terrace Pond, Beech Mtn. Your Bearfort Caches are among them.

 

Kanouse is the Old Glory, Cache. Jeremy Glick's Overlooks is the Covert 002 area

 

When I bought the book I found that I had done 9 of the 13, have since done 2 more, Apshawa and Assikiniwikam I have a cache on one of the unofficials, which is a rarely visited cache overlooking Bearfort Waters, but for any Hiking Book or equipment groupie it is well worth the price. Each area offers vistas that are worth the walk.

 

Folks,

 

Have you done Boulder Pine Peak, Jennings Mtn, Flagpole Vista (above Warwick Tpk)? There are 17 in the book. Two additions to consider are Black Rock (above and just south of the intersection of Morsetown Rd and Westbrook Rd.) and West Mountain (a 1,440' peak just south of the Ernest Walter Trail and West Pond).

 

Regarding West Mountain, hike up to Surprise Lake via the State Line and Ernest Walter Trails. Continue on the EW past the outlet for West Pond and climb to where trail makes a 90 degree right turn. Turn left here and bushwhack to the top. For some real excitement, follow the ridge south over two more peaks for views of Upper Greenwood Lake and Flagpole Vista. Finish at a small pulloff along the southeastern end of Upper Greenwood Lake. This is some wild territory. Watch for bears and good luck!

 

Don

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The Book is available by the magazine rack at Campmor. On Sunday last past I went to Osio Overlook, which is the Torne, very enjoyable walk.

Regarding Campmor.

I noticed that they seem to have gotten a whole load of new titles into stock, there must now be 10 titles dealing with GPS topics. New Trail Conference Maps and New National Geographic Topo series for those going with Triton GPS

Edited by Packanack
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Up the Creek, sans paddle

 

Many people (5) who cache have expressed , to me, a desire to expand their horizons and enter a different world. The show featured above is a great one and will expand your outdoor activities greatly. There are many vendors, clubs and the like present. I recommend it highly. Gear Junkies of the world converge.

 

One of the most memorable caching days I have had was spent on Splitrock Reservoir paddling after caches. The most difficult cache in NJ was placed by kayak.

Edited by Packanack
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GC15NAF

 

3 finders first week , no finders in last 6 months. FTF went by boat, 2 others went by foot, but they are rugged manly men.

 

I use an Old Town Loon ( should be obvious) 138, it is a rec kayak, but is 13 feet 8 inches long, so it has a pretty good glide, but it is beamy and has a large cockpit, I am not sure it they still make it or not. I also paddle an Old Town Pathfinder canoe, great for fishing and camping excursions. Take in the show even if you have minor interest.

 

The point post is really to cross reference cachers to other resources that they may find to be of use. I see cachers talking about hiking and biking and paddling and working them all together. This show is just another place to check out tools.

Edited by Packanack
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Cool !

 

Am torn on how to spend my "cash it in before the world ends" gov't. rebate check that's supposed to come in May.

Hilleberg tent or kayak?.... daaaammmmiittt.

 

Well, that would be a great place (probably have to stay over) for the zillion questions I usually pose.

Have been leaning to "hunter" type models for the width/extra room for the extras I'd like to take along. All the experienced heads there, may come up with other options. Maybe a smaller canoe is needed instead.

 

Thanks for the info.

Cache safe.

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GC15NAF

 

3 finders first week , no finders in last 6 months. FTF went by boat, 2 others went by foot, but they are rugged manly men.

 

I use an Old Town Loon ( should be obvious) 138, it is a rec kayak, but is 13 feet 8 inches long, so it has a pretty good glide, but it is beamy and has a large cockpit, I am not sure it they still make it or not. I also paddle an Old Town Pathfinder canoe, great for fishing and camping excursions. Take in the show even if you have minor interest.

 

The point post is really to cross reference cachers to other resources that they may find to be of use. I see cachers talking about hiking and biking and paddling and working them all together. This show is just another place to check out tools.

 

I can't figure out why I did not know of the existence of this cache...definitely on my "to do" list now. :laughing:

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GC15NAF

 

3 finders first week , no finders in last 6 months. FTF went by boat, 2 others went by foot, but they are rugged manly men.

 

I use an Old Town Loon ( should be obvious) 138, it is a rec kayak, but is 13 feet 8 inches long, so it has a pretty good glide, but it is beamy and has a large cockpit, I am not sure it they still make it or not. I also paddle an Old Town Pathfinder canoe, great for fishing and camping excursions. Take in the show even if you have minor interest.

 

The point post is really to cross reference cachers to other resources that they may find to be of use. I see cachers talking about hiking and biking and paddling and working them all together. This show is just another place to check out tools.

 

I can't figure out why I did not know of the existence of this cache...definitely on my "to do" list now. :(

 

I would do this one by Kayak once it warms up a bit. Looks like the difficulty / terrain ratings are based on a walking trek. I am guessing this would be much easier by paddle. Maybe Packanack can hold off on archiving this one a bit longer.

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Ok, I won't archive it --actually I was hoping to get some interest, so I wouldn't have to go after it myself, a guy with a stranded travel bug is holding me responsible and he told me I have to go retrieve it. So that got me to thinking, what would Tom Sawyer do .... :(

 

But I think we need to get the thread back to where it belongs --Equipment, must haves, don't bothers etc.

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I've seen a bunch of cachers out on the trails with Camelbak hydration packs, so I expect some of you guys out there might be able to help me out. I received a Camelbak Rogue for my birthday and I'd appreciate someone with experience to weigh in about them. I don't really hike any farther than ten or twelve miles on a longer day, so I don't need much space for food or gear, and I have enough pocket space in my cargo pants for my miscellaneous stuff. Do these packs hold up well against the wear and tear that caching inflicts, and is this particular one (70oz. reservoir/two medium flattish pockets) big enough to suit my needs?

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I have a Mule for short (under 8mi) trips and a Commander for longer.

CJ and I have a number of cheaper imitations also.

 

Your Rogue was built on the lines of a bike bag (streamlined, room for water, light snack and little else), but if you carry most of your stuff in pockets anyway, you should be fine.

Most packs are the same materials with styling/colors' different, reflecting price.

We really beat the crap out of 'em (rocks, caves, etc.) and they ALL (even the cheapies) hold up well.

The bladders' protected well by that nylon shell.

Never fell on my back on one yet . Maybe I'll do a product test on a cheapy... :blink:

 

Suit your needs...

What's your average intake for a day of hiking? Sipper or a gulper?

Ever see those large Arizona iced tea cans? 70oz. is three of those.

I need the commander or bring a 70oz "unbottle" plus a alum. bottle or two on longer hikes because I'm a real water-pig.

I'll drain my pack before CJ has hers half full/empty - depending on your outlook :)

 

Cache safe.

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Good review! It sounds like I'll be just fine with what I've got. I'm definitely more of a sipper; three of the big-boy iced tea cans would last me a while, so 70oz. of water should be plenty. I'm not looking to beat the pack up much more than the occasional bump, brush, or drop, and I won't need the pockets for much more than maybe a Powerbar, a ziploc bag of trail mix, or some loose swag. Thanks for helping me out!

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I also have the MULE which I use for both geocaching and mountain biking. Discovered I need the extra pockets when out biking. The Rogue will be perfect for what you've described. Oh, and I have fallen backwards on my bike. The bladder protected my back. It was amazing. I was prepared for the pain as I was falling but was more of a soft, dull thud.

Edited by CondorTrax
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Our "unbottles" are similiar to yours, minus all the strapping/bag.

Never tried freezing them, since they all ARE very thin PVC or TPU material.

We never put regular cubes in, since they are roughed edged.

Instead, we place ice "tubes" or "balls" in the bag after putting some water in.

Cylinder and ball cube makers usually can be found in bigger name grocery store's "seasonal" aisle. CJ's even spotted them at that Wal-place once.

 

However, Camelbak themselves says it's okay to fill HALF or less and be sure to lay flat in the freezer.

 

If you decide to try it a few times, please tell me how it turned out.

Cache safe.

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Normal ice cube won't hurt the camelbak bladders. I usually fill mine half with ice straight out of the ice maker on the fridge. I've been using the same 100oz bladder that came with my camelbak hawg that I got prior to going to Iraq in 2001. Its been on 2 "trips" to Iraq and one to Afghanistan. Now its my short hike bag that gets used several times a week, and the original bladder and bag is still holding up great.

 

Make sure to clean the bladder often and get one of those blue hanger things to let it dry when its not being used. Dishsoap is fine for normal cleaning, use the tablets a few times a year to really clean it.

 

Filling the bladder half with water and freezing it does work too, however I find it doesn't melt fast enough to use. Though it does feel great on your back on a hot day..

 

Also ditto what other have said about the kahtoola microspikes, great gear and lightweight too.

Edited by Limhi
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Dayn Ja, Dayn Ja--I used to love watching Steve Irwin--when he used to say that it would get my attention.

 

Well I got an E Mail that got my attention:So I pass it on. I understand that the outleach causes some kind of issue with feminization (intereference with hormones) of young men. But I am not sure of that, but it is worth looking into.

 

 

Nalgene Nuc International has directed vendors to withdraw Nalgene® water bottles made with Bisphenol A from sale. Accordingly, Boy Scouts of America's National Supply Groups is immediately withdrawing all Nalgene® brand water bottles from sale at Scout Shops, online, and through retailers across the country.

 

Safety is our top priority. Any parent or consumer who has purchased Nalgene® bottles at our stores should stop using the product and wait until arrangements are made by Nalgene® to receive an alternate product.

Edited by Packanack
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Spikes for hikes

 

A little thread bump:

 

Kahtoola (sp) Micro Spikes are now being carried in stock at Campmor, Paramus, NJ

 

More substantial than stabilicers, or Yak-Trax, but less cumbersome than crampons, these new products got some traction among winter hikers last year. So if interested you might want to look into them before the snow flies.

Edited by Packanack
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Spikes for hikes

 

A little thread bump:

 

Kahtoola (sp) Micro Spikes are now being carried in stock at Campmor, Paramus, NJ

 

More substantial than stabilicers, or Yak-Trax, but less cumbersome than crampons, these new products got some traction among winter hikers last year. So if interested you might want to look into them before the snow flies.

 

So I got a pair of these and I do like them. We used them quite a bit last winter. They were great for everywhere I hiked in NJ and on some pretty steep icy stuff on Bear Mountain in Harriman (my boyfriend forgot his that day and he had a lot of trouble with the hard packed snow and ice). I also tried them in the Adirondacks (Wright Peak). I did not really like them for that hike (too steep) but it might just be me as my boyfriend seemed to like them. There was a decent amount of bare rock, so I felt more comfortable taking them off and just avoiding the icy patches where possible....but I also nearly slid off a mountain wearing crampons once, so I'm not overly comfortable with those either :o

Edited by trowel32
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Don Weise of West Milford, who has a nice book out on the High Peaks of West Milford, puts you on his mailing list if you buy the book, and he sent out the following, and I pass it on to the Geocaching people who actually might have some interest in the topic. I specifically make no comment on the issues, but I hope to be soon chasing you off the trails with my straightpipe :D Kawasaki ATV, as I try and "jack" deer with my 30-06 on any given Sunday. :D So if you are down with this you can make your views knows. I am Packanack and I disapprove of this message.

 

1. On October 23rd, New Jersey just took a giant step toward allowing hunting on Sundays. The state Senate passed a bill (vote was 32-6) authorizing deer hunting on Sundays during any bow and arrow hunting season in Wildlife Management Areas (WMA’s) and on private lands. This would effectively close off the trails there to hikers during hunting season. This would also affect our Baker’s Dozen/Winter 17er peaks. Now the legislation is headed for the State Assembly. I have nothing against hunters or hunting, but there are six days a week (including Saturday) when people can hunt…please consider taking action to preserve our one “safe” day -- Sunday -- for the rest of us who hike, mountain bike or just want to enjoy the woods:

 

http://www.capwiz.com/nynjtc/issues/alert/...ESS=Take+Action

 

 

2. Off-road vehicle (ORV/ATV) legislation is about to hit the New Jersey State Assembly floor and the Senate Transportation Committee. Riders need a legal place to ride…however, our hiking trails are not the place to do it. New, proposed legislation will provide for registration and identification of ORV’s and enforcement and penalties for illegal riding. It also establishes an “Off-Road Vehicle Recreation Fund” (supported by a $5 fee at the time of registration) to designate and maintain a safe and legal place for people to ride ORV’s right here in New Jersey. Riders and hikers have both been calling for this kind of legislation for years now. I hope you’ll consider supporting it by clicking on the link below and encouraging the Legislature to pass Assembly bill A823 and Senate bill S2055:

 

http://www.nynjtc.org/issues/NJATV.html

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