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Cemetary Caches


superfastcacher
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Count me in as one enjoys them. My very first find was in a local cemetery, which is also used by many locals to walk in. There is a cache in the old cemetery where my grandfather is buried as well. There is a lot of history and some cache owners go to alot of trouble to tell you about it and the interesting people buried there. I see people exercising, walking dogs, kids riding bikes in cemeterys. Disrespect is the only reason I can see why someone would disapprove. I don't find it disrespctful but that is my opinion and to each his own.

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We love cemetery caches--we are 2 away from hitting 300 of them. We visited cemeteries long before we started caching. We enjoy the history and the interesting markers, we have always been respectful and we are teaching our daughter to be respectful as well. Sometimes I think that we may be the only people caring ( or alive ) to visit some of these graves.

 

We do what we enjoy and ignore what we don't. Ignore is a very useful button!

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If they are in cemeteries away from headstones and where mourners are unlikely to be encountered, then I have no problem with them.

 

Cemeteries are used for all kinds of non mourning related activities, including jogging, bird watching, genealogy, dog walking, painting, tombstone rubbing, historic research and photography . I don't see why geocachers shouldn't be included among the respectful users of cemeteries.

 

When I visit a cemetery for a cache (or otherwise), I'll often stop at some graves and think about

the people buried there. The times they lived, what they might have talked like, looked like and what they

experienced in their lives. These departed are often long forgotten and I think anything that brings people there to reflect on their lives can't be bad.

Edited by briansnat
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Your responses will vary from "I love them" to "I loath them". In some US states they are actually illegal, and in some states every other cache is in a cemetary (try finding caches around Cinncinati, Ohio).

 

I personally think caches amongst the graves, or even ON them, are tacky. Unless the cache is placed at the grave of a hard-core geocacher and this fact is mentioned in the description.

 

Otherwise, stick to placing them around the perimeter, or inside common areas. But that's just my opinion.

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Your responses will vary from "I love them" to "I loath them".

 

I'm guessing that it depends on whether they are numbers hounds who view this as a game, or if they are

the kind of cachers who use the sport as a means to explore the world around them.

 

I think the former group is more likely to have issues with cemetery caches and the latter is more likely to

be OK with them

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I especially enjoy going to old cemeteries around Montana. Many times there isn't even a town anymore but the cemetery is there as testament to the people who once lived there. Walking amongst the headstones and reading the names gives a hint to at least the nationality of the locals. Dates and ages on the headstones give clues to when the community was occupied, can tell of particularly bad years and also the mortality of the young. Sometimes I find myself trying to guess what the lives were like in the little mining towns dotted throughout the mountains. Or I will be picturing the life in one of the many farming communities that are quickly disappearing from the countryside as the farms become larger and equipment more efficient. Also, by following along the routes of the fur trade or the military, you can come across well known events such as The Battle of the Little Big Horn.

I use the Garmin topographic mapping software on my GPSr.

Sometimes I criticize it for not being up to date on roads and streets but mostly I like the fact that it does show a lot of old mining trails, old farm roads, old highways. Sometimes all you can see is the raised strip of land covered in grass to prove that once there used to be a road there.

Also the maps show forgotten towns, school houses, churches, and cemeteries. The little communities thrived throughout the state but now there maybe just a husk of a one-room school house or a little rundown church.

I don't think it is disrespectful at all to place a geocache in a cemetery. Maybe it’s to bring someone to a historic spot or to bring someone to a place of special memory for the original hider. Maybe it’s to show something unique or maybe just to bring someone to an out-of-the-way, forgotten place. As for those who cache in cemeteries, try not to be disrespectful and take in the moment.

Peace be with you.

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Your responses will vary from "I love them" to "I loath them".

I'm guessing that it depends on whether they are numbers hounds who view this as a game, or if they are

the kind of cachers who use the sport as a means to explore the world around them.

 

I think the former group is more likely to have issues with cemetery caches and the latter is more likely to

be OK with them

This might be the first time that I disagree with a Briansnat post. I think that there will be the full range of replies from both camps. No matter how you prefer to geocache, your opinion of the usage of cemeteries can vary.

 

And there are many cachers who have a foot in both of those playing style camps depending on their mood of the day, which is how I view myself. Yesterday was a perfect example, as I took a road trip with a plotted 70+ waypoint route that excluded multis and puzzles, and difficult terrain. It was mostly a numbers run with lots of urban micros targeted. Yet at one cache I was brought to the site of a former apartment complex that has been flooded and destroyed by a hurricane several years ago. It's been turned into a tree collection and education park. So I took a 20 minute break from caching to stroll the trails, and learn about the trees and their history. There is even an apple tree from a seedling of the last known official Johnny Appleseed planted tree in Ohio.

 

But I do agree with his first reply to the thread. As long as the cache is placed with respect to the residents, there isn't any problem with placing nor seeking a cache in a cemetery. I even saw a family enjoying a picnic at one cache I visited during MWGB. And that cache listing took me to the gravesite of a three war veteran. That was certainly someone worthy of paying respects too.

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If they are in cemeteries away from headstones and where mourners are unlikely to be encountered, then I have no problem with them.

 

Cemeteries are used for all kinds of non mourning related activities, including jogging, bird watching, genealogy, dog walking, painting, tombstone rubbing, historic research and photography . I don't see why geocachers shouldn't be included among the respectful users of cemeteries.

 

When I visit a cemetery for a cache (or otherwise), I'll often stop at some graves and think about

the people buried there. The times they lived, what they might have talked like, looked like and what they

experienced in their lives. These departed are often long forgotten and I think anything that brings people there to reflect on their lives can't be bad.

 

 

I too agree. Very well put, briansnat. I have visted a couple of cemetery caches. All were well done, non-invasive and memorable. I remember one cache in particular, a puzzle that ended in a pet cemetery, that we spent quite a bit of time browsing the tombstones and reflecting on the thoughts expressed on them--a very emotional experience.

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Without looking in cemeteries for cache placements this story may have been lost, except for the immediate family. Please visit this cache online and read about how the wrong soldier may have been killed (murdered).

INDIANA SPIRIT QUEST #563 "The General's Guard"

I love cemeteriy caches and so do the rest of our team. Peace and quite usually. I prefer them way out in the country mostly.

Thanks, Team Lost in the Woods

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While caching with some friends yesterday, (they of course put the waypoint into my GPS) I found one titled New Albany National and asked if this was the New Albany national Cemetery (Which is where my parents are) I've been there several times and didn't even know there was a cache there! So after the cache, I took my friends to see my parents.

 

I'm in the "It’s OK if done with respect" camp.

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If they are in cemeteries away from headstones and where mourners are unlikely to be encountered, then I have no problem with them.

 

Cemeteries are used for all kinds of non mourning related activities, including jogging, bird watching, genealogy, dog walking, painting, tombstone rubbing, historic research and photography . I don't see why geocachers shouldn't be included among the respectful users of cemeteries.

 

When I visit a cemetery for a cache (or otherwise), I'll often stop at some graves and think about

the people buried there. The times they lived, what they might have talked like, looked like and what they

experienced in their lives. These departed are often long forgotten and I think anything that brings people there to reflect on their lives can't be bad.

In my personal opinion, I agree 100%.

 

However, there are obviously people who do not think that anything not primarily related to remembering the people memorialized in a cemetery is disrespectful. To paraphrase a rule of thumb for harassment:

 

If it might be perceived as disrespectful, it is disrespectful.

 

I think I've FINALLY found a cemetary to place a night cache!!! That will be FUN!
I suspect the idea being put forth here is what many who have a problem with cemetery caches are worried about. A cemetery is a place to remember loved ones who have died, not a place to go to scare people.
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I would like to know peoples opinions on wheter cemetary caches are O.K. I personally don't think they're a good idea, but could I get others thoughts? I just think it is really disrespectful to be walking over peoples graves to get to a cache.

First, I think you meant "cemetery", the places where dead bodies are buried, rather than "cemetary". I vastly dislike caches located in cemeteries, just as I dislike caches hidden in or near playgrounds.

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Suppose, just suppose that the cemetery owners and the families of those interred feel that the activity of geocaching, in their cemetery, is in and of itself, disrespectful? Suppose that they feel the same way wrt joggers, bicyclers, picnickers and the like.

 

Unfortunately geocachers, joggers and picnickers have yet to be designated the deciders of all that is respectful and good in such locations.

 

Now in my particular case, I am a member of a select group of individuals, approximately 3,000 strong, who ARE the deciders on one cemetery. I can assure you that the instant that geocachers, joggers, bicyclers, picnickers and the like become an issue there...........it will stop.

 

And yes, I have found caches in cemeteries and will continue to do so. Get use to it.

 

And no, I can't define every instance of what disrespect encompasses. And no, I will not try.

One things for certain, I'll know it when I see it and that will be sufficient.

Edited by Team Cotati
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First off I am from S.C. and I won't bore you with the particulars of our state.

 

That being said I enjoy cemetery caches. I love the ones in small cemeterys that have been forgotten. I always show respect and never step upon graves. I will stop and read the headstones and see who is buried there. It is all part of our history. I see nothing wrong with these caches if they are done respectfully (hidden and found).

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I would like to know peoples opinions on wheter cemetary caches are O.K. I personally don't think they're a good idea, but could I get others thoughts? I just think it is really disrespectful to be walking over peoples graves to get to a cache.

First, I think you meant "cemetery", the places where dead bodies are buried, rather than "cemetary". I vastly dislike caches located in cemeteries, just as I dislike caches hidden in or near playgrounds.

I changed the spelling Thanks

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Cemetery caches are more than 'OK' with me, they are one of my favorite places to go, geocaching or not!

 

I became fond of cemeteries back when my grandmother would take us on Sunday trips with her to freshen the flowers on our relatives graves. We children would help her weed the plots and carry away the waste materials to the dump pile. Then we'd play off on the open green lawn while she chatted with her cemetery friends (No, she wasn't psychic, I mean the other women there doing the same thing that she only knew from those visits). At some point in the day we'd all stop and have a nice picnic lunch, sometimes sharing with the other families doing the same thing. I came to see cemeteries as the place to celebrate the lives and loves the deceased had left behind.

 

I rediscovered cemeteries when I began doing my family history. Walking through the rows of the old cemetery, I learned about the children in the family that died between censuses, and the second wives whose names I would otherwise never have known. All the forgotten people in my own family. I also learned about the local heroes, memorialized forever. Naturally I took my children along with me when I visited these places, and they too had learned to appreciate our family and local history through the epitaphs written on stone.

 

There are associations of people who go to cemeteries all over the world, just because they like cemeteries. They tour them and then they post notes about them online. There are people who go to seek out particular types of stone, or momuments, or garden plants. One of the national cemeteries near my home gives regular guided tours. You can arrange for a horse-drawn carriage ride at some times of the year.

 

There are people who go to cemeteries specifically to locate burials and provide the info online for others. Many genealogists spend a few extra minutes writing down the burials near their loved ones, and then post them online in case that will help someone else. Many of them use GPS technology to pinpoint graves.

 

And of course, people interested in the paranormal visit cemeteries to try to learn more about a particular kind of haunting (with permission, of course!).

 

Some botany buffs seek out cemeteries to look for rare flowers or plants that have been conserved because the land was not plowed under and built over.

 

I did a botany study in cemeteries myself in college a few years ago. The professor was impressed; it was one of the most unique class projects he had seen in his Botany class. I wanted to see how cemeteries had affected the local flora. I learn a lot--one thing I learned was that our ancestors visited the cemeteries, too. They 'planted' their dead among the hard nut trees, near vining berry plants, and added pretty flowers to bloom in every season. You can just bet that your great grandmother climbed the hill in the late afternoon, neatened her mother's grave and those of her children who died young while her other children gathered whatever fruits and nuts were ripe. Then they sat to enjoy the cool breeze at the top of the hill, while appreciating the view of the homestead and watching the men and boys finish up the days work. If the seaon was right, they all went in the home to dinner that included a nice berry pie.

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I don't believe that a cache ON or even NEAR a tombstone would be good, in fact I think that cemetery caches really should be just outside the cemetery, possibly part of a multi where information from the tombstones can be used to find the final. That being said, though, there is a LOT of history in most any cemetery you can find, and any cache that comes with a history lesson gets an A+ in my book. If they are set up properly and do not disrespect the departed, I think there's nothing at all wrong with them.

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Yesterday, a group of about 50 geocachers gave back to the community by helping clean, repair and reset tombstones in a neglected cemetery. It was a CITO event and dozens of stones were laboriously scrubbed clean, glued back together, and reset on their bases that were re-leveled. It was all supervised by Professional Cemetery Restorers.

 

RESPECT? You bet! Check out the photos on the Cache Page:

 

PREBSTER CEMETERY RESTORATION CITO EVENT

 

eb95e5db-26bc-4ce5-8698-a71813c2a5cf.jpg

 

Team ShyDog, a member of GEO-ISQ cleaning a stone under professional guidance at CITO Event.

Edited by SixDogTeam
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I really love visiting cemeteries. I go for photography, wandering through them, and geocaching. I'd have an issue with caches that are on/very close to headstones, but most of the Spirit Quest (Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan) caches I've come across are well done, away from the actual markers, and very respectful.

The history of these places is just fantastic. I tend to create stories about the people in my head as I go, who knew who in the cemetery, how they lived, how they died, who they were. I am a big history fan, so that fits my character, too.

One cemetery I found this week was really neat. There was the typical rolling hilly grass area with many markers, but up behind that area, in the woods and higher hills, there were plots of ten or fewer stones scattered about. You'd find one such area, then walk along the trail a bit, and find another around the bend. This wasn't such a good thing for me, as I was on a timetable. I ran out of time before I ran out of caches on my list for the day. :) But it was a nice stroll. I even did a bit of CITO, and pulled some clinging vines off a couple quite old stones that were getting overgrown.

Yesterday, a group of about 50 geocachers gave back to the community by helping clean, repair and reset tombstones in a neglected cemetery. It was a CITO event and dozens of stones were laboriously scrubbed clean, glued back together, and reset on their bases that were re-leveled. It was all supervised by Professional Cemetery Restorers.

 

RESPECT? You bet! Check out the photos on the Cache Page:

 

PREBSTER CEMETERY RESTORATION CITO EVENT

 

<<clipin' pic, as you've already seen it once!>>

 

Team ShyDog, a member of GEO-ISQ cleaning a stone under professional guidance at CITO Event.

Cool! Wish I'd known and had the day off, I'd have loved helping out in something like that!

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However, there are obviously people who do not think that anything not primarily related to remembering the people memorialized in a cemetery is disrespectful. To paraphrase a rule of thumb for harassment:

 

If it might be perceived as disrespectful, it is disrespectful.

 

Yes, but that can obviously be taken too far.

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However, there are obviously people who do not think that anything not primarily related to remembering the people memorialized in a cemetery is disrespectful. To paraphrase a rule of thumb for harassment:

 

If it might be perceived as disrespectful, it is disrespectful.

Yes, but that can obviously be taken too far.
It can be taken too far either way. As we are talking about how to play a game, while the opposing interests are concerned about the sanctity of a potentially sacred space, I think giving "them" a little more leeway when it comes to "taking it too far" isn't a bad idea.
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However, there are obviously people who do not think that anything not primarily related to remembering the people memorialized in a cemetery is disrespectful. To paraphrase a rule of thumb for harassment:

 

If it might be perceived as disrespectful, it is disrespectful.

Yes, but that can obviously be taken too far.
It can be taken too far either way. As we are talking about how to play a game, while the opposing interests are concerned about the sanctity of a potentially sacred space, I think giving "them" a little more leeway when it comes to "taking it too far" isn't a bad idea.

I can see what you're trying to say, I don't like extremism either way.

 

I personally think that the caches should be away from the graves themselves, placed so that regular people in the cemetery won't be bothered by the cache/cachers. I don't agree that caches shouldn't be in cemeteries at all.

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Firstly, I'm quite surprised that the moderators have permittted a duplicate thread like this to last so long.

It's been running in "The Hunt/The Unusual" since August: Cemetery Caches, who likes them?

 

Your responses will vary from "I love them" to "I loath them".

 

I'm guessing that it depends on whether they are numbers hounds who view this as a game, or if they are

the kind of cachers who use the sport as a means to explore the world around them.

 

I think the former group is more likely to have issues with cemetery caches and the latter is more likely to

be OK with them

 

I will graciously, but strongly, disagree with Brian on this one. The cemetery caches that I've seen are cache and dashes. That should appeal to the numbers hounds. Liking or abhoring cemetery caches has nothing to do with exploring the world around you. It has more to do with religious/moral upbringing, and the respect that one has for the dead. I've spent quite a bit of time exploring the world about me. (And geocaching has aided this attempt.) But, nope, many may enjoy it, but playing games in cemeteries is, to me disespectful, and morbid. When I wish to pay respet to the dead, it will not be by playing games in cemeteries.

It's a matter of personal feeling. No amount of argument is going to change anyone's mind. Why do people feel the need to keep bringing this up in duplicate threads?

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To me cemetery caches are very respectful. I take the time not just to cache but, to look at the headstones. You'll be amazed at the craftsmanship and what is written on them. There is an unbelievable amount of history that you can learn from caching in a cemetery. Everyone keeps referring back to the Indiana Spirit Quest series. Want to know more you can check out the first one Indiana Spirit Quest #1. As SixDogTeam said earlier we did a wonder thing this weekend here in Indiana by paying back the privilege of caching in cemetery's by restoring one. I for one enjoy the caches and learning from them. I will continue to cache in cemetery and each time I do so I will reset fallen flags, upright overturned flowers. Anything I can do to make the place a place to respect and admire. Caching there is not disrespectful in manner.

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I think I've FINALLY found a cemetary to place a night cache!!! That will be FUN!

Looking forward to this one!

 

And put me down as loving cemetery caches. Our group adopted a cemetery virtual, too. I've always liked wandering around cemeteries and looking at the headstones, the names and dates, thinking about history, etc. Like any other activity in a cemetery... Don't interfere with the primary activities of the cemetery and pass up the cache for later on if you'll be in close enough view of mourners to cause a distraction to them.

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But, nope, many may enjoy it, but playing games in cemeteries is, to me disespectful, and morbid.

See. You missed his point. For a lot of people geocaching is not playing games any more than many of the other hobby examples given.

 

If geocaching is a game to you, then it's understandable that it would be disrespectful in cemeteries. However, not everyone shares your definition of geocaching. I don't see geocaching as a game. Sure, you can make a game out of it, but it is not inherently a game.

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....When I visit a cemetery for a cache (or otherwise), I'll often stop at some graves and think about

the people buried there. The times they lived, what they might have talked like, looked like and what they

experienced in their lives. These departed are often long forgotten and I think anything that brings people there to reflect on their lives can't be bad.

 

I do that. Even if it's a mere cache that had me pause for the moment. While others can grab and go, I can't. Not there. Something always grabs me and I pause in this world and just take it in.

Edited by Renegade Knight
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I have to admit that the first time I took Mrs. CCC to a cemetary for a cache she was mortified. Since then some of our fondest geocaching memories are of the history that we have learned while at cemetaries caching. If you want to learn about people and history, these are the places. Our favorites are pioneer cemetaries and those with the types of memorials that we should never forget because of what the represent. I agree that placement is the key and I don't support caches that are placed in a cemetary in an innappropriate way. But for those done respectfully, count us in, we will go to as many as we can. I can tell you that there will be a cache placed at my grave when I go but I hope it won't be placed for a long time.

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I would never have seen this interesting headstone if there had not been a cache in the corner of an old cemetery on the western slope of Colorado.

 

116_WOWMemorial.jpg

 

I think cemetery caches, especially when they bring a cacher to an old, historic cemetery, are fine. I would never hesitate to search for one.

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I would like to know peoples opinions on wheter cemetary caches are O.K. I personally don't think they're a good idea, but could I get others thoughts? I just think it is really disrespectful to be walking over peoples graves to get to a cache.

First, I think you meant "cemetery", the places where dead bodies are buried, rather than "cemetary". I vastly dislike caches located in cemeteries, just as I dislike caches hidden in or near playgrounds.

I thought you were against cemetery caches.And now your saying yes i'll search for them.Sorry wrong person

Edited by Bushlight
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Suppose, just suppose that the cemetery owners and the families of those interred feel that the activity of geocaching, in their cemetery, is in and of itself, disrespectful? Suppose that they feel the same way wrt joggers, bicyclers, picnickers and the like.

 

Unfortunately geocachers, joggers and picnickers have yet to be designated the deciders of all that is respectful and good in such locations.

 

Now in my particular case, I am a member of a select group of individuals, approximately 3,000 strong, who ARE the deciders on one cemetery. I can assure you that the instant that geocachers, joggers, bicyclers, picnickers and the like become an issue there...........it will stop.

 

And yes, I have found caches in cemeteries and will continue to do so. Get use to it.

 

And no, I can't define every instance of what disrespect encompasses. And no, I will not try.

One things for certain, I'll know it when I see it and that will be sufficient.

Ok now i got the person.I thought you were against cemetery caches.

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I have no problem with them as long as they are placed a respectful distance from the markers and are not actually on the grave.

 

I have learned a lot of history and interesting stories while visiting caches in/near cemetaries. I have even taken the time to clean off some of the "potter's field" type of markers for people I have never heard of. Part of life is how we remember those that came before us and a good way to do that is visit a cemetary.

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Firstly, I'm quite surprised that the moderators have permittted a duplicate thread like this to last so long.

It's been running in "The Hunt/The Unusual" since August: Cemetery Caches, who likes them?

 

Your responses will vary from "I love them" to "I loath them".

 

I'm guessing that it depends on whether they are numbers hounds who view this as a game, or if they are

the kind of cachers who use the sport as a means to explore the world around them.

 

I think the former group is more likely to have issues with cemetery caches and the latter is more likely to

be OK with them

 

I will graciously, but strongly, disagree with Brian on this one. The cemetery caches that I've seen are cache and dashes. That should appeal to the numbers hounds. Liking or abhoring cemetery caches has nothing to do with exploring the world around you. It has more to do with religious/moral upbringing, and the respect that one has for the dead. I've spent quite a bit of time exploring the world about me. (And geocaching has aided this attempt.) But, nope, many may enjoy it, but playing games in cemeteries is, to me disespectful, and morbid. When I wish to pay respet to the dead, it will not be by playing games in cemeteries.

It's a matter of personal feeling. No amount of argument is going to change anyone's mind. Why do people feel the need to keep bringing this up in duplicate threads?

 

Why can't you do both? No one's forcing you to cache and dash. It IS possible to grab a cache in a cemetery AND pay respect to the dead.

 

I respectfully disagree with your statement about religious/moral upbringing. I have the utmost respect for the dead; I consider myself very "religious" (definition of that term could open a whole new can of worms) and moral; and I'm also a big fan of geocaching. I don't think participating in cemetery caches makes me any less moral than someone who doesn't. Playing paintball in a cemetery... now that would be disrespectful, IMHO.

 

And I completely agree with your last statement about personal feeling. Bickering is not going to change anyone's mind. (though it is interesting to see others' opinions)

Edited by NCUltrasoundtech
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For those who believe that walking in cemeteries is disrespectful, well I guess `disrespectful' is a very relative term, but when my time comes, I'd be happy knowing that the property above my final resting place is being enjoyed by people. What, you want your own little plot for all of eternity for only yourself to enjoy? Of course, that's just me.

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